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0

I used to worry similarly about "alligator" vs "crocodile." The truth is --it's nothing to stress about, one way or the other. This isn't your child's only chance to learn the distinction, and he or she won't hold it against you if you get it wrong.


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What a great question! I have found that many young children have difficulty distinguishing one type of animal from another. My son learned the word "dog" very early on (both spoken and signed). He used the word dog to describe cats and wolves and foxes. I have witnessed many young children make similar mistakes: Cows/horses, snakes/lizards, cats/dogs. My ...


3

There are some good answers, but I was puzzled over one part of your question. You write: I don't know the difference between rat and mouse, and fox, wolf, and jackal in real life. Means that I know they are different but I can't make out who's who on seeing them. Do you mean that you not know the difference between those animals, and would not be ...


1

At 22 months, I wouldn't worry terribly about accurately identifying the animals in a drawn picture book. Drawn pictures won't ever be all that accurate, and honestly reading to her is more important than accuracy. Keeping her involved whether it's a rat or a mouse is what's important. What I would do is get a photo book of animals which features the ...


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If I'm understanding your question correctly (and please correct me if I'm wrong), the artwork in the book doesn't sufficiently differentiate the characters enough that you (as an adult) can tell them apart. I think your concern about confusion is valid. Is there a particular reason you really want to keep using that book? I would be a bit concerned that ...


3

Over time kids get better at distinguishing animals... for a while, my toddler called most four legged mammals (cat, dog, cow, horse) all "cat" because we had one at home, and the other animals were close enough. It's basically a matter of whether they've been shown the difference, either in-person or in pictures. Provide as much range of information as ...


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You could try a memory game with tiles flipped over. Each player flips one tile, then a second to try and find a match. If you make a match, you keep the tiles. This can help with pattern recognition and memory. Start with a small number of tiles, say 4 (two pairs) just to get things going. Once she starts to catch on, you can increase the number of tiles to ...


3

If she enjoys reading and recognizes that there are good times and less good times to do this, then invite her to help you build that aforementioned Arduino alarm. Another option might be to put a lock on her light switch; http://www.amazon.com/Master-Lock-Universal-Switch-Lockout/dp/B001925P6W/ref=pd_cp_hi_3 The worst thing I can imagine happening here; ...



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