New answers tagged

1

The trick my mother used was to draw a cute bumble bee on the palm of my left hand. Whenever I was confused, she would ask "Where is the bumble bee? Give him a 'hand hug'." A "hand hug" was closing my fingers over the bee and sticking my thumb up (makes a lower-case b shape). She said "if you can't hug a bee, then it must be a d (right hand)". It only ...


1

You will have to persevere yourself to teach perseverance: 1) Slowly introduce an activity which is fun but which they are not good at. 2) Repeat the activity frequently, increasing the complexity, and making it more and more fun. 3) Express how much better they are getting at it, just from having practiced before. 4) Be patient and persevere until ...


1

Two strategies for teaching grit and perseverance 1. Demonstrate it - this happens naturally, but I make it a point to explain in age appropriate terms how I am working towards my goals. 2. Look for and encourage grit in your child. When they put in extra effort, even if it does not lead to success let your child know you are proud.


1

I have some experience with literacy, and not much experience with writing. This advice is picked up from listening in on literacy teachers strategy sessions. Here are my suggestions: Not to worry. He's writing already -- he's ahead of other 4-year-olds -- when he gets into kindergarten and first grade, this will probably all work itself out. It's not ...


0

Mirror issues are extremely common - and if you think way back to prehistoric times, it was crucial for our ancestors to recognize the pawprint of a predator or prey, not whether it was a left or right paw. (That would be for the better hunters - aka readers today.) That's how our brains are still wired for a large part. The fact that your child still has ...


6

I agree with Drew, that the odds are very good that he's complaining about your order not because it's hard but out of a sense of following the 'rules'. My four year old might well have had a similar complaint when he was at this stage of learning. Answering the question as asked, though, the main thing is simply to reward effort, not success. Rewarding ...


1

My wife took the approach of letting our 5 year old learn at his own pace. She would ask him if he wants to write some letters. He said no for months. She honored that. He drew pictures and developed internal skills by doing things he wanted. Now he asks questions like "how do i write shush". His mom explains. "How do I write letter H". I can see that this ...



Top 50 recent answers are included