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46

Since you're not thrilled about the depiction of violence in the book, but are reluctant to have your child singled out as different, maybe you could read it with him and discuss the violence and brutality. Use this as a teaching situation, where you can listen to his interpretation of the violent themes in the book and add in your own two cents.


37

I would keep doing it as long as the child is interested in it, and might even press the issue a while later. Jim Trelease is an advocate of reading aloud thoughout (at least) the elementary years, and his research is compelling. He has published collections of stories and book recommendations that are age appropriate as children grow up. This story of a ...


27

You might consider that children are affected by violence differently than adults, especially violence in books. Their imagination isn't as horrible as ours. A lot of what makes the book impactful to adults will go right over a child's head, due to their inexperience and lack of maturity. If you've ever reread a book as an adult that you first read as a ...


24

I'd say keep reading the bedtime stories for as long as your child is willing to let you! It is not only a great opportunity for parent-child bonding, but it also fosters an appreciation of reading. Eventually you'll reach a point where they feel they're "too old" for that, and I suspect you'll wind up missing that ritual. If the stories themselves are ...


20

Did you consider writing something on your own? For example, take a look at Tolkien. Take his story and make a chapter of your own, with your own words. Make it a bit easier. Leave out titles that are hard to grasp, and try to create sentences that are as easy as possible. You don't have to be a writer to do this; you can use what's in the book, just ...


16

There are several potential advantages: Literacy: Being functionally literate is practically a requirement for modern life, and the greater your comfort with the written word, the easier it is to acquire knowledge. Reading to your child encourages them to think of books as "normal" things, and starts this process early. Entertainment: One of the key things ...


15

Your little guy will be back for more stories, don't worry, he's just exercising his independence a bit. My son is 3 and adores books, although less so now than a year ago, and he likes to flip through books on his own and act like he's reading them. I encourage that wholeheartedly, even though he can't read he is interpreting the story himself, making his ...


14

Another explanation could be psychological. Hear me out, it sounds far fetched but makes sense. Yawning is contagious because a group's social ties are strengthened using such mechanisms. This can be seen across many species of pack animals, and humans belong in that category. So when you want your kids to sleep, you are putting yourself in a suitable ...


14

As a teacher, librarian and parent, I can tell you that there is no end to the benefits of reading to your children. I would encourage that you continue reading aloud with your children even into high school. Beyond the valuable bonding time it provides you with your child it allows for a number of educational benefits. First, even when a child can read, ...


14

Whilst it helps to start early, it's never too late to start a habit :) I also have a very active toddler and the following helps: establish a routine: for example I read to my kids for about 10 minutes just before bedtime, every single day. They know it and expect it (big drama if we try to skip it) get him to pick the book he wants: at read-time, i ask ...


14

(Warning: Spoilers) Whereas the Hunger Games is a violent book, it is probably one of the few that shows the consequences of that violence. The death of Rue, the moral dilemma of kill-or-be-killed and the sacrifice of Katniss taking her sister's place all offer something for a child to learn. Even the death of foxface (I forget the character's name) was a ...


13

I remember reading Lord of the Rings when I was 11. It opened my eyes to a whole world of wonderful literature that was genuinely interesting. Books with war and violence evoke strong emotions. While I agree that not every child is necessarily ready for dealing with those emotions at that age, I would say that it's up to parents and teachers to support ...


12

We had the exact same problem and not only was she not playing enough (in our minds) but we were going crazy reading all the time. We finally put a three book limit per sitting. She brought us books and we would read three and then say it is play time. Later in the day we were willing and ready to read three more. This worked for us and she learned to ...


11

What about comic books and graphic novels? Many pictures, little text (usually) and a lot of true masterpieces. Some classic books are available as graphic novels. And of course there are many excellent original comic books.


11

The easiest answer is to start early. If you start reading regularly to your child while they're an infant, and continue the practice as they get older, it should be a seamless transition. If you start later, it becomes a bit more difficult, particularly if regular television viewing becomes part of the routine, as a child used to fast-paced, brightly ...


10

Check out some of the things Terry Pratchett has done. Even when he writes for children and young adults and the language is simpler, the ideas communicated is still the same advanced Terry Pratchett ideas. I've read many of his young adult book sand enjoy them just as much as his "normal" books. If your reference to "Mittens the Kitten" is this: ...


10

Obviously, the first decision is to determine if the individual child is ready or not for the book in any one form of reading it - alone, with a teacher and class, and/or with a parent. That really is a personal and individual decision as the answer for any given child will depend upon that child's particular sensitivities, reading abilities and moral ...


9

The best way to teach a child to read is to read to them alot, which I'm guessing you already do. With my kids, I would work on a different word every night when I'm reading them their bedtime story. I'd pick a word that I thought would come up a lot in the book then spell it out and sound it out with them. Then, every time we got to that word in the ...


8

I'd say that yawning is a good thing. This is sleepytime, you're in a bedroom, and you're sleepy (parents of small children are always sleepy). Forcing yourself to stay awake and alert is exactly the opposite thing from what you want your kids to pick up on and emulate. Also, it's entirely possible that your behaviour's based on theirs. They're sleepy, and ...


8

No matter how well your child reads in elementary school, there's always going to be plenty of material that's appropriate, but beyond what he or she could read and really understand on his or her own. Reading together is a chance to expose your child to lots of great literature, and that in turn makes it much more likely that they'll read more on their own ...


8

Reading is like any other activity. It only becomes harmful when it is done to the exclusion of other important activities or replaces real life interactions. This might happen when he is older and can read by himself, and chooses to do so instead of his homework, physical activity, or meeting friends. Or if it is impacting his health, like by constantly ...


8

Let him learn that when he damages a book, he's left with a damaged book. Taking it away from him shows him that you don't want them damaged; whereas leaving it with him shows him why he shouldn't want that. If he gets upset, show him how to fix the book (another valuable lesson), but the easiest way, possibly the only way to really teach someone to care ...


8

I think that comprehension doesn't come until reading is more effortless for the child. Early on, they're expending all their effort just reading letters and figuring out the words. As a point of reference, I noticed that my oldest daughter seemed to have very poor comprehension through Kindergarten and first grade. It seemed that in second grade the ...


7

One excellent supplement to books is to use closed captioning when the television is used. This puts the words being spoken on the screen in tandem with what the child is watching. While it is not as riveting or entertaining as the reading material can be; it helps address the other side which is to help raise the reading ability.


7

Oh yes I have this problem too :-) Not only when reading to my son, also when singing at events :-( One thing I can think of is that one cause of yawning is simply lack of oxygen. Don't slouch; sit with a straight back so that you can breathe fully. Take a deep breath occasionally, this can also double as a small artistic/suspense pause in the story.


7

Don't worry too much. He is demonstrating how much he likes to read by wanting to do it himself. You can help him by giving him some basic tools to start working it out on his own. This will make his time "reading" more productive as he learns to recognize the important parts of text. Show him where the words are on the page. Point to the words as you ...


7

In addition to the literacy, entertainment, bonding, and language, I would add: values. Whether you read stories that actively tell stories of your religion and culture, or just ones that have the same "backstory", the books you read help to centre your child in your values. To use a North American example, if you read a story where one of the actions in ...


7

My immediate impression is that it's a power struggle. He wants your attention. He wants you to play with him. He sees your reading material as the thing that is keeping you from interacting with him. Unless your new material is suitable for children (and you don't mind it being torn etc.) then don't give him your things. Instead, put them away and play ...


6

I think the value being gained is the quiet one-on-one time. Whether you're reading him books, or he's reading to you, or you're just chatting probably doesn't matter. When my 3-year old son is particularly difficult to get down sometimes I'll just snuggle in bed with him and tell him what I know about random things. Why people have pets. What do firemen ...


6

Have you just wandering around your local library? I've found quite a few books in ours with some pictures mixed with more complex text. Greek mythology works well - the stories are reasonably complex. We also used our library to get our daughter out of her comfort zone (in terms of themes). If she was stuck on Hardy Boys for too long, we'd try ...



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