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0

I disagree with slapping an erroneous label on a child that is doing nothing more than exhibiting a strong will. Medicating a child into submission is lazy parenting and should be outlawed. A good old fashioned spanking and consistent communication works wonders. And frankly, I think many teachers are lazy as well. They expect 5 year olds to behave like ...


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It may just be that his body is just not making enough of the sleep hormone melatonin. That could be the simple explanation. Take him to your doctor.


5

The thing to do is not teach him to be wary of people, but of behaviors. Most of the bad things that happen to children are perpetrated by people they know. Children and adults both benefit from interactions with each other. It's a shame that this rich source of learning is so often stifled. What we teach our children to watch out for is adults who: ...


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It is a tricky balance at 5, or 30 for that matter. When he is about that age I would start by saying that he should not approach people that he has not been introduced to by you and should immediately come get you if someone he has never seen before starts talking to him. You don't have to get too detailed, just explain that you want to make sure you know ...


1

I think this is one of those situations where the saying, "Girls mature faster than boys" really comes into play. Your son has zero interest in girls beyond that of friendship right now, which is exactly what I would expect out of a seven-year-old boy. On the other hand, the little girl has obviously hit the stage where she's starting to become more ...


2

I think that your son and the girl are incapable of understanding love as we understand it - and we adults are just as incapable of understanding of what is going on in their heads and hearts. I would not tell the parents immediately. They may overreact. See how the situation evolves. Also, they may already know (though the lipstick kisses on the letter ...


1

Your idea of a parent building a small world of "magical" but credible and educational characters to introduce their primary school child to richer cultural environments is valid. And, as you openly acknowledge, the parent’s gamemaster role has the potential for ethical dilemmas which should be wisely considered and planned for before embarking in the game. ...


0

A's behaviour presents obvious ethical dilemmas (starting with children's right to privacy, their right not to be deceived/misguided). If you genuinely believe that children have a right not to be deceived/misguided (as per the update/edit) then to follow the proposed course of action is in exact opposition to that viewpoint. The activity outlined ...


0

You mash up a bunch of different things in your question. HEALTH. http://housecalls.djmed.net/wellness/jogging.htm Because of the increasing danger to the growing child participating in adult type marathon events, the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued an official statement against it. Several years ago the academy stated that there was ...


3

In a recent study, I saw a report of, children were able to catch lies of omission. I found the study interesting, because it basically showed that if a parent or other authority figure lies to a child, the child will trust them less. It's main focus was that it was not just direct lies, but lies of omission - but I think that it tell us how children reacts ...


4

What makes A think they could succesfully pass off as an astrophysicist, a musician, an artist, a philosopher, a mathematician, and a neuroscientist? The only things the child could get out of this are gross misconceptions about what all those people do.


4

I see two major problems with this: Parents shouldn't be interacting with their own children on a peer level. Tricking your child into being "just friends" could lead to some very awkward situations. Like what if your child says something to you while being tricked where you feel you need to intervene as a parent? You'd probably break the ruse then, ...


1

I wonder, if (1) A does not have any friends of his/her age, that he/she needs to fake friendships with his/her child... or (2) B does not have any friends, and B tries to "help" with imaginary friends... To answer your question: yes, I think it is worse, than pretending to be Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy. The other question about becoming ethical ...


9

I think the question needs to be asked... what is the purpose of these letters? I honestly have a hard time imagining a situation where this could be justified for such trivial purposes as you mentioned. There is a psychotherapy technique that involves a similar method, but that's a different question entirely... and such things should probably involve ...



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