Hot answers tagged

34

How about trampolining? It's very similar to gymnastics so he can probably use many of the skills he's picked up there. It involves lots of bouncing up and falling back down again as well as moves which involve falling on the front or back. Also a good variation on swimming that might appeal more to his love of falling down is diving. He can do this from ...


30

My unpopular opinion is it's not your call to make. Your child is definitely old enough to know if he wants to see his father or not. If he's not in any actual danger, I think a parent has every right to see their child. If you're concerned about a negative impact, then supervised visits may be best. I can say that I personally had a father that was in and ...


28

Experiencing failure at something (or even success but not being the best) and finding that it's OK, and even something can help him find ways to improve and be better in the future, would help. Rock climbing, with appropriate safety measures, can teach a lot here (as can some other sports). Reframing not even trying as failure might help too. If he ...


28

I've got a hard time explaining the motives of the terrorists. I don't know whether this is the best article on the subject (it's near the top of this Google search) but for example What Motivates Terrorists? starts with, One of the most frequently asked questions about terrorism is also the most intractable. Why? Why do they do it? Why do people ...


27

I would recommend without hesitation Judo. Not only would he fall often, he would learn to fall properly.


25

I'm going to skip over the entire religious part of the question and answer what you should do about the much simpler part: If a teacher physically assaulted your son over a verbal debate, you should take legal steps. This person is unfit to be a teacher. You should talk to a lawyer.


23

The answer will depend on a lot on all parties involved and your expectations: The child: Is your child able to remember to take the coat? And bring it back home? I have two children that were both raised to be independent and responsible - Yet, my 9 yo still struggles to remember basic things (there is a reason he owns 4 pairs of gloves...) and we had ...


21

Yeah, normal. Some things that work in our family: Appreciate that they're tired straight after school and might need some quiet time and space. Ask them specific questions about things that you already know a bit about, e.g. "What did Ms Smith think of your cat drawing?" (instead of "What did your teacher tell you today?") "Did you play with Johnny ...


17

Energy is the power to do things. I'm sure your 5 yo is full of it. When he is full of energy he can run and play for hours on end and have a good time. When he runs out, he can't do that any more and needs to sleep and eat to build up more so he can play again. There are many kinds of energy, like electrical and heat. Electrical energy lets the ...


15

Diving is all about falling with style. If he finds the activities you listed boring, I suspect that he will enjoy the adrenaline rush from the height.


14

Your kid doesn't understand the difference between this and any other toy because he's sane. It is a toy and almost completely incapable of hurting anyone. He probably has a dozen things in his backpack more dangerous than this toy. It is the adults in the situation that are screwed up, not the kid. He's not supposed to bring toys to school, so his ...


14

Is this a problem? My personal feeling is that, yes it is. The issue here is one potentially of child abuse -- not your children, but of M. I would question whether M has been subjected to inappropriate requests, or even subject to CSE. It could actually be nothing, but if M is being abused at home or elsewhere it could save M years of hurt if things were ...


14

We all sometimes think that a kid will be more happy with things like gaming consoles and free time and no curfew and junk food. But I have a nagging suspicion that this is a classic example of what is far more important to a kid for their emotional well-being. It seems like expressing love comes readily to you. Even expressing to your step-son that his ...


14

A mistake a lot of parents make is saying "Stop that. I said stop that. Stop that at once. If you don't stop that we're going home now. Stop it. I said stop that ...." on and on infinitum without actually doing anything. As far as the child is concerned its just meaningless background noise. Does this sound familiar? If so, then you are right in ...


14

This is the line I've taken, for better or worse... Like in school we trust teachers to be telling the truth about things in lessons. The people who attacked France, were told lies by their teachers but they really, really believe them - they think that we're bad people and they're good. So they want us to live their way. The way they were taught tells ...


13

Without more information about your legal status, we won't be able to give a fitting answer. However, I will try based on the given information. "We need not destroy the past. It is gone." - John Cage If there is no indication the father has had a bad influence on him or might expose him to the wrong people, I can't find any cause for your son not ...


13

I'm a parent governor in a UK primary school, with a daughter just started reception and another daughter higher up the school, who was reading before she started reception (so I've been in a similar situation). I've been a school governor for about 4 years so I have a pretty good idea how British primary schools work. We're in England; from your profile ...


12

It may have a poor cultural connection where ever you are, but no one has yet suggested: skateboarding. Not scootering or some other watered down variation, but the unforgiving plank with wheels. It's creative, very difficult and takes an exceptionally phenomenal amount of physical fitness[1] as well as technicality, balance and precision. Moreover all it ...


12

Things that worked for us: Give the child a little time to relax after school, get a snack, etc. They may be more willing to talk after some down time. Ask specific questions. For example, instead of "What did you do today?", which has a long list of items to recite, try something like "What was the best thing that happened today?" Still requires more ...


11

It's possible that she is just being dramatic and doesn't actually intend to hurt herself. If so, great, but there's likely still some truth to what she said: she feels like she isn't getting attention, and/or she feels like she isn't valued and loved. The fact that she's been increasingly sensitive to criticism indicates this if nothing else. However, it's ...


11

You are not expected to love your new graddaughter the same as your first one. But you are expected to love her for what she is: a beautiful loving child (your own words). That means she is an individual that has a right to be seen as such. She is not an incumberance or a distraction that comes between your first grandchild and you, but an addition. ...


10

You have my sympathy. Having one child with encopresis is awful. I can't really imagine accurately what it's like to have two children with this problem. Parents of children with idiopathic constipation often blame themselves and their toilet training problems (which were often present). First a quick reassurance: a rectal examination finding stool in the ...


10

--- Disclaimer: Some might feel this answer to be hard to digest. --- Have you ever thought about what is happening in your kid's brains while they are watching TV? I mean, from a neuroscientistic perspective? Basically a fireworks of impressions without any chance to influence what is happening. A child in front of TV will absorb a flood of pictures, ...


10

It's fairly simple why he does it: kids don't like getting into trouble, and his avoidance method works because it delays his consequence and there is no additional consequence for running away. Kids will adjust their behavior to fit the permissiveness of the adult in charge. Do you remember in school there would be some classes where the students would ...


10

say "let's find out together". Then collect some different magnets, some magnetic and non magnetic items, something the magnetism can be transferred to (screw driver or pin). Some type of compass building items would be nice too. Metal shaving would be nice for showing the magnetic field. Then do experiments, when possible have your child guess the outcome ...


10

If he's afraid of not being the best at everything, I'd teach him about specialization. Point out how silly it would be if we had doctors building roads and bridges, or firemen teaching classes at school, or chefs playing baseball on TV! (Wait for him to laugh at the mental image.) People have things that they're good at, and things that they're not good ...


10

My daughter went through this, and it took a few years until she was old enough to articulate what made her sad about the old photos and stories. While we were all reminiscing and fawning over her cutest, most-precious photos and the priceless moments of days gone by, what she was hearing was that she was no longer so "baby cute" and how we missed having ...


9

Have you considered Capoeira? It's a cross between dance and martial arts that involves quite a bit of playful acrobatics and falling. Here are a couple samples from YouTube, which give a flavor of the sport: Adult Performance and Children's Competition. Your son is blessed to have a dad who looks for an activity in which he can express who he is!


9

Poor little guy. Try searching for information on "childhood fears" and "night terrors", those are the usual terms used. Here's one set of basic recommendations: General Guidelines for Any Age When your child is afraid -- whether at age 5 or 15 -- remember to approach the fears with respect. Chansky suggests following these basic guidelines: ...


9

Richard Feynman tells this story in "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman": It was the kind of thing my father would have talked about: "What makes it go? Everything goes because the sun is shining." And then we would have fun discussing it: "No, the toy goes because the spring is wound up," I would say. "How did the spring get wound up?" he would ...



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