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39

How do I deal with the situation? How do I discipline her? I think a lot of people are equating "discipline" to "punishment", when that isn't necessarily the case. Unfortunately your question doesn't tell us much about your values or parenting style, so I can only provide a few comments and possible directions you might go in. Summary She doesn't ...


13

The key to getting a reluctant practiser to practise anything (a musical instrument, reading, physical exercise, whatever) is to change from: Time for you to go practise X! to OK, time for us to do your X! I don't mean stand over him with a timer and glare to ensure he doesn't stop at 9 minutes 30 seconds. I mean you show your enthusiasm for the ...


9

I would get him to play more on days when he is does not have sport or late finishes, and get him just to do a couple of scales or something on days when he has more on. As he starts playing for longer he'll also start enjoying it more as he'll start becoming more creative.


7

Insisting, forcing him to do something will most likely not work in the long term. Yes, he may improve, but it'd be much much better if he wanted to improve. You should talk to your son, ask him whether he wants to learn to play well or not. If he doesn't - I think you shouldn't force him. I admit that he will eventually learn, but it'll cost him much and ...


5

Without exception, every adult I know who took piano as a kid but no longer plays, including some who were quite talented, had it turned into a chore by their parents. It is absolutely essential to find a way to keep it fun. So I would make your busiest days fun days, where you still expect him to play, but let him play whatever he wants. It might ...


5

At the early stages holding a childs interest is far more important than practicing. the child must want to learn and forcing practice would make it a chore rather than a good time and you could stifle the childs own natural gifts. When i was taking lessons I did not want to show up for lessons if i had not practised for fear the teacher would look down on ...


5

You could ask him what he wants. Ask him if he wants to pratice a bit for getting good progress, or if he is too tired.


5

Getting a crush on a boy at ten years old is really normal and reasonable and nothing to worry about. I had my first crush (on my big sister's boyfriend, I might add!), when I was only six years old! At that age, it is kind-of hero-worship and it is really good for kids to "practise" emotional attachments and social interactions. I think it is unlikely that ...


4

I hope you did not give her the impression that her diary was private because if you did, then you will do real damage to her trust in you if you let her know that you read her diary. This is the most important thing to take away from this situation in my opinion. Trust is easily lost and regained with great difficulty. She might even start thinking its okay ...


4

Well think back to when you had your first love. I hardly think discipline is the correct form of action, it sends the signal that love is a bad thing and I'm pretty sure that's not what you want to do. I understand that you as a parent want to protect your child however too much protection isn't really helping as it shelters your child from what the ...


3

I'm going to add a little contrast to the other answers. I think you should insist, but carefully. Focus on having your son set goals, encouraging your son / being there for him, setting a routine, and possibly finding a better teacher. I have been playing the piano for more than 10 years, and I never would have made it this far if my parents did not ...


2

When I was a boy of about 11, I decided I wanted to learn to play the piano. My parents didn't really care one way or the other, but they were pleased that I took an interest in something other than video games. They found a piano teacher who was also a relatively young elementary school teacher. I looked up to her like she was some kind of goddess, and ...


2

I think that, to answer a question of whether you should insist, depends on how important it is for you that he improves in that particular skill. I believe that insisting on something that he's not interested in doing is counterproductive and stunts learning, although it may be necessary in some circumstances, like school or domestic chores for instance. ...


2

Since you are obviously concerned about your daughter the first thing you need to do before deciding any actions to take is find out a little more about the boy. This might be tricky because if she feels you violated her privacy in any way you will be very unlikely to get any cooperation, same for if she feels you are pressing her too hard. Talk to her ...


1

Ten minutes of practice each day seems like a reasonable thing to ask of him at this age. It may be a little much for him to handle if he's also doing sports on certain days though, so I can understand your hesitance. On days where he's had to go to sports practice, you could try asking him first if he's willing to do is practice. If he's not, then ...


1

She is only 10 years old. There is nothing "only" about being 10. It wasn't when we were that age, and it certainly isn't today when kids get into "that age" sooner than they ever did. Besides, "10" is just a number anyway -- my own girl, at 10, is basically at the same stage physically that her mother was at the age of 14, and that is not ...


1

Best way is to tell the truth, but in a way that she can listen to a story, where someone else learns to love or falls in love.


1

Has your child ever had to deal with failure before? This could be a new experience for her that she hasn't been prepared for in her life. Failure is a part of life - and something that is very difficult to learn how to deal with. As a parent it can be too easy to try to shelter a child as they grow from failure. The result later on can be a child who ...



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