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27

If she's asking you which bits need work and why, that's a sign she's open to criticism, and that she trusts you to provide it. The thing about criticizing creative work is you want to be as specific as possible. "This part needs rewriting" is a completely useless criticism. If she knew how to rewrite it better, chances are she would have already done it. ...


19

I think perhaps you should re-assess what your expectations should be for an 8 year old both in writing quality and in capacity for taking criticism. I know few, if any 8 year olds who can take criticism in the way some adults can, and fewer still who have any self-criticism at all. There can be a significant difference in quality between what kids produce ...


4

Maybe you should ask her teacher how she takes criticism in the classroom, if you can find a teacher that gives the student feedback these days. Personally I like to ask questions: "Do you think it would sound better if you did ........ " or "What if we put that sentence over here, read that do you like how that sounds? " Also try to get her asking ...


2

I agree with all the answers above, and I just wanted to amplify the point that this issue has almost nothing with your daughter, or poetry, or writing or even children in general. All people of all ages when they are in the early stages of attempting to master some new task are looking - nay, craving - positive reinforcement, and they don't really care if ...


2

Some of my kids went through phases like this, some didn't. I saw the same with friends and their kids. In fact, I do remember one such phase when I was a child. It came, made my parents struggle a bit helplessly, and it went. I have no idea where it came from and what it was. I think this mostly isn't about the fears they experience, but something beneath ...


2

You should absolutely probe deeper into why she feels unsafe at home, as that's very disconcerting. Regarding her relationship with her teacher and academics - I had a first grade teacher who was honestly the most negative and critical person I've ever met. For example, she would call her first grade students 'failures' for not coloring in their drawings ...


2

Talk a lot to her. I know you already do that, but she needs to put her feelings into words. This way she will begin to self-diagnosis for the roots of those confidence issues. Everyone, specially girls, need to be able to talk their worries out of their chests. Get everyone in the house involved. If she has siblings, constant teasing won't do much good. ...


2

My son was in a very similar situation two years ago. In addition to my follow up answer, I would like to add that the main thing we discovered is there was almost nothing we could do at home about his behavior at school. We offered everything from spectacular rewards down to harsh punishments for a year, to little avail. He stopped taking his frustration ...


2

I motivated my daughter to practice clarinet by playing with her. We got some duets and played together. Even now (20 years later) when she comes home we'll go in the cellar and do those duets again, loving every minute. I suppose this is a bit tricky with a piano, but... there are tunes for four hands, right? And maybe he could accompany you (or his mates) ...


1

Ask your pediatrition. Those words are often used by teachers to tell you they suspect ADD. Teachers are not medical professionals so are not supposed to suggest your child might have a particular medical problem. So a teacher is not supposed to say, "I think your child may have ADD."



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