Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

45

Since you're not thrilled about the depiction of violence in the book, but are reluctant to have your child singled out as different, maybe you could read it with him and discuss the violence and brutality. Use this as a teaching situation, where you can listen to his interpretation of the violent themes in the book and add in your own two cents.


27

You might consider that children are affected by violence differently than adults, especially violence in books. Their imagination isn't as horrible as ours. A lot of what makes the book impactful to adults will go right over a child's head, due to their inexperience and lack of maturity. If you've ever reread a book as an adult that you first read as a ...


14

(Warning: Spoilers) Whereas the Hunger Games is a violent book, it is probably one of the few that shows the consequences of that violence. The death of Rue, the moral dilemma of kill-or-be-killed and the sacrifice of Katniss taking her sister's place all offer something for a child to learn. Even the death of foxface (I forget the character's name) was a ...


13

I remember reading Lord of the Rings when I was 11. It opened my eyes to a whole world of wonderful literature that was genuinely interesting. Books with war and violence evoke strong emotions. While I agree that not every child is necessarily ready for dealing with those emotions at that age, I would say that it's up to parents and teachers to support ...


10

It depends on the kid actually. Many kids will "play" even as toddlers and in elementary school and just experiment with the different sensations that happen in that area of the body. However, most kids hit puberty and start masturbating with an actual result sometime during the Middle-School years or between 11 and 15. Of course there are exceptions that ...


10

Obviously, the first decision is to determine if the individual child is ready or not for the book in any one form of reading it - alone, with a teacher and class, and/or with a parent. That really is a personal and individual decision as the answer for any given child will depend upon that child's particular sensitivities, reading abilities and moral ...


9

Sounds to me, like you and your daughter had a very healthy and honest conversation - and trust me when I say, those are the kind that work. I worked with adolescents for ten years as a health and science teacher as well as was advisor to a class of about 20 eighth grade kids each year. Considering the fact that I had around 100 kids each year I taught, ...


8

Speaking as a former teen-aged geek, here's a few things that have worked for (and on me - thanks Mom and Dad! :) ) Organized sports are kinda hit-and-miss for a geek (esp. if it's not their interest). Teen years are rough to start with. And some people don't get "runner's high", so they lose the reinforcement that keeps some of those solo sports going. ...


6

This varies dramatically from kid to kid. Some discover it as toddlers and never forget, others not until well into their teens. Because the libido spikes around puberty, this is the most common time to start regular masturbation (usually as a tween), especially for boys. A lot of young women don't start masturbating regularly until a bit later due to a ...


6

Teenagers? I've masturbated for as long as I can remember, probably since age 3 even though I didn't know what it was - it just felt good. As the years passed I learned what it was and just kept on going. Always in private, but at some point my awkward mom asked me to not stain the bedding. I complied and there hasn't been a word since.


5

As a former nerdy kid, I'd say that group sports, with their tendency to be full of cliques and popularity contests, were very hard for me. I've always been more at ease with biking, hiking and cross-country skiing - activities that did not depend so much on skill, that were pretty much individual in nature, and that weren't overly competitive. Many geeks I ...


5

There is an element of this that is a natural part of growing up. Kids mature at different ages and when they start maturing socially and a different rate from friends it can create strain. What one girl considers fun, the other will no longer think is fun because it is something "younger kids" do. The more mature one, may be more interested in boys and ...


5

It is funny that you've posted this because my seven year old daughter freaks when her dad takes of his shirt or she sees men shirtless even though we have always had a very open policy about nudity in our house. I don't know that this answer will work for you and we are only just beginning to think about these types of questions at our house, but we've ...


4

I disagree with removing hockey. Why? I remember being in the exact same situation and how it affected me as a person. When I was that age, I had one thing: music. It was my passion. At 13 I was writing Manilow-like music (it was 1978) on our horrible piano and I was playing trumpet and french horn at school. Meantime, my grades in Civics, Math, etc, ...


4

Violence is unfortunately a factor of life. It does no good to hide your child from life. I am a member of both Amnesty International and the Campaign against the arms trade (CAAT). My daughter (now 13) has been on a number of demonstrations with me and has done since she was 8. A much better approach is to accept the reality of life but read the book with ...


3

As your goal is physical activity and he seems averse to sport, perhaps you should consider non-sport things that you could do together. Doing things as a family activity takes away the competitive element and also the need to excel or get better at something. Go camping or fishing. Go hiking. Go to nerdy conventions and scour the exhibit hall (miles of ...


3

I started "pullin it" just to see what it would feel like at 11. At about 12 and a half, I started doing it until ejaculation, and doing it a lot. Don't talk to him about it. I'm 13 and thank god my parents haven't found out/talked to me about it. Just let him google stuff when he has a problem. It's worked for me. Source I'm 13 years old


3

In the UK we let kids of all ages go trick or treating - when young a parent will accompany them but only to the end of driveways etc, and as they get older they will head out in groups with their peers. Typically they need to sing, tell a joke, or otherwise entertain the householder in order to get a treat of some kind, but there is certainly no culture of ...


3

My kids aren't old enough for this situation yet, but I like how my parents handled it. Part of the problem is the child needs the skills to stand up to an authority figure, in this case a peer with a forceful personality. You also have the dilemma that you want them to make good choices, but you also want them to feel free to tell you about difficult ...


3

Assume your daughter needs 8 hours of sleep (it might be 9 or 10, but whatever.) Can she get that from 2am to 10am (or 3am to noon), and if so, is that ok? First, she probably can't. The sun will come up (especially in the summer) and raise the light levels in her room, which will cause her to sleep less deeply. Other people in the house, who didn't stay up ...


3

I was raised in a solely Spanish speaking home in the U.S. and have friends that come from English and Spanish speaking homes watching their sibling that only responded in English to their parents Spanish commands really hindered their ability and comfort speaking the language as they got older. I highly suggest insisting your child respond to you in Danish ...


2

Ask the child to excuse your for a minute. Then, dress up quickly and attend to the child's needs, if any. If he/she brings up the topic, then you might have to discuss about sex. If he did not see much, you could probably pass it off as cuddling. If he saw too much, then you will have to explain everything to him, obviously in a way that he can understand. ...


2

I winced before clicking and was extremely relieved to learn that the problem is sartorial, not sexual. You need to let your son know that it's none of his darn business what clothes his sister wears. Call him on his hypocrisy and emphasize that he doesn't get to control his sister. Different households have different standards of modesty. If your son was ...


2

Even if he's a beginner, you should be able to find him a way to ramp up his skills and learn the sport. Maybe check with your local gym to see if there's a coach that can get him started on the basics before the upcoming season. Also, this isn't a DIRECT answer to your question, but giving his proclivities it popped in my head: what if you game-ify his ...


2

I think age ten is perfect. Before the middle school drama sets in. I travelled to Arizona (from New England) alone to meet my grandfather there when I was 11, and it was wonderful. I mean, I had a flight attendant chaperone, but I felt so grown up without my little brother and parents. And then, it was super to have the one on one time with my grandpa. ...


2

I wouldn't worry about it until it comes up. Lots of people, especially people who don't drink or who don't drink much, feel they have to 'normalize' alcohol to their children. But many, many people don't drink. Although some aspects of adult society make us think we have to justify the decision not to drink. in fact there is no justification needed for not ...


1

The answer largely depends on your daughter. How do you think she'd react? Full honesty is fine, and the approach my spouse and I took. At times my kids held it over my head a bit, but they knew us better for it and it worked out well for us. I think it might have helped them get a good idea of how the world worked and not to make bad assumptions. The ...


1

What an awesome question! People always talk about "The Talk" but talking to kids about sexually related topics is something that happens over and over again throughout a child's upbringing if a child is being brought up in a frank atmosphere. There is the, "where do babies come from" as well as the, "why can't I come into your room when-ever I want" and ...


1

Many fully-grown adults require a certain amount of noise to sleep (hence the sleep function on your TV and on many alarm clocks that include a radio function as well). I did find one study (and admittedly only read the abstract) that showed that background music can result in delayed sleep and sleep with less depth. However, the study was more focused on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible