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58

This one may be a challenge - UK laws on knife carrying are not age-related (although there is an age limit on purchasing knives) but they are related to size of knife and to some extent what you are doing with it and where you are carrying it. Personally I think a Swiss Army Knife is appropriate for outdoorsy kids from an early age - whenever they can ...


45

I am a scout leader from Germany. We allow children to carry pocket knives as young as 8, but only under these conditions: Children with "behavior problems" are exempt (at the discretion of their leader). If they want to have one, they are first taught the rules of using knives (it's a tool and not a weapon, never cut towards your own body, never cut ...


13

CISV - the name used to be "Children's International Summer Villages" - is a partnership organisation of UNESCO. UNESCO is a United nations organisation that promotes peace. It is very unlikely that a partner organisation of UNESCO would be a sect or a cult. Wikipedia has some information about CISV. The Wikipedia page does not list any criticism, and ...


11

Expanding from my comment: I believe it is very unlikely that she is going to change unless she later determines that she is bisexual rather than a lesbian. It is incredibly hard for someone to "come out" and tell others that they are LGBT. I have only ever told two people that I am bisexual. I have a nephew and a couple close friends who are gay men. At ...


10

Eleven is an OK age for handling a nice compact Swiss Army knife. That said, he (or she) would need to be taught and shown how to use and handle it, in just the same was as you might show him(her) how to hammer a nail (Hammers are very dangerous - just check how many gruesome TV murders use one ;-). It's important that you are happy to provide the help and ...


8

The ultimate goal of any punishment or discipline method ought to be discouraging a repeat of that behavior in future. It sounds like he's more focused on the part where he's done wrong and deserves punishment — not making the next leap of logic to the part where he's learning from mistakes. My daughter frequently sneaks junk food into her room late at ...


8

"Scratch" will allow you to create a simple videogame and get some experience with basic programming concepts. After that there are some good resources for starting Python here.


7

I have been a part of CISV for over 15 years and involved with many programmes, unfortunately not interchange but I do know several people who have participated in interchange and found it very enjoyable and rewarding. The skills I have learnt from CISV have been invaluable and I have enjoyed the rewarding activities I have been lucky enough to participate ...


7

You should talk to your Sea Cadet leader. Scouting and cadet organisations are used to dealing with both the laws and the practical safety aspects of children with knives. If I recall correctly from when my son was in Scouts, its basically illegal for him to carry it unless he is going to an event where the organisers have declared that knives are intended ...


7

Both are valid options, but reading your post carefully I'd suggest finishing the school year at the old school. A list of pro's (in somewhat random order): Finishing at his old school should give him some sense of closure - this phase ends for all the current kids next summer. So I can understand that he doesn't want to leave prematurely but (perhaps ...


7

I noticed some of the same changes in my son when he discovered the world of on-line community. Rudeness and inappropriate language is standard issue, and his on-line communication style morphs to match whoever he is interacting with. This is quite normal, I think. Kids want to fit in. They want to identify with their peers and be accepted by them, and, ...


6

As with any relationship issue, I would recommend not trying to change her, but to work on changing you. Work on becoming the kind of person a teen would want to open up to. First, you need to create opportunities. That means do activities together where talking is okay, but silences aren't awkward. That eliminates movies because you can't talk. ...


6

The following link from .gov.uk clearly describes the UK legislation. https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives In essence carrying a knife with a folding blade of length less than 3 inches is legal. Threatening someone with a knife of any size is, of course, illegal. Even though a small knife is legal, if your lad is stopped by the Police or by a teacher ...


6

We've gifted pocket knives to our kids as young as 7 years old. It's about the time they start scouting and other outdoor youth programs, where they would have a good environment and reason to use one. Proper training occurs over time - a one time teaching session isn't enough. Once you give them one it's best to create activities and opportunities to use ...


6

I am from Anchorage, Alaska, so I will not attempt to comment on UK law or social norms. However, I grew up with knives and think I can comment on that aspect from another perspective. Alaska is an idiosyncratic locale, and we are generally raised in a more experiential (i.e., learn not to cut yourself by accidentally cutting yourself) way. I was given my ...


6

I don't have a lot of experience with pre-teen girls, other than having been one once upon a time, but since I was asked to elaborate on my comment. I agree with your assessment that making it 'forbidden' will make it more attractive. If I were you, I would figure out what is non-negotiable to you as a parent. Homework, chores, hygiene and so forth. If ...


5

Children with ADHD often have co-morbid (all that means is that they happen at the same time) conditions, such as OCD; up to 25% of kids with ADHD may have OCD as well. It's very commendable that you're in touch with your child about this and you are understanding and open with him. Your experience would be the same with an adult with OCD as with a child. ...


5

Hm. Sorry, I don't know a name for this behaviour, but rest assured, your son is probably very much focussed on your conversation. Those seemingly distracted movements actually may help him to focus. This is a similar mechanism as doodling (random drawing) while talking on the telephone or other people absentmindedly tapping their foot. Basically an outlet ...


4

I would have no idea how to approach this with a 12-year-old, but we recently had a similar situation with a 6-year-old niece who stayed with us for an extended period of time while her mother and father battled out some custody and other issues. It is an extremely difficult situation to approach, and all I can offer is moral support and an explanation of ...


4

I'm 17 years old, and it was about 4 years ago when I developed this problem. I laugh for just about everything. I laugh when I'm happy, when I think of something funny, when I'm nervous, embarrassed, and when I'm getting yelled at! I hate that I laugh when my parents are yelling at me, I really do! I know that it only further pisses my parents off ...


4

A totally different (and probably complementing) aproach from Ossum's Mom's brilliant answer (+1) would be to make sure that these children feel that they are important to you. That they matter to you as opposed to you being just "that funny person that stops by". That is, talk to them, listen actively and remember what they tell you. At the next visit, show ...


4

For each family, find things you do well or enjoy that the parent(s) do not, and find a fun way to bring the children into your world -- assuming they're old enough for that activity. Do you like fly fishing, but this couple does not? Take the kid(s) fly fishing. Do you like art museums but this family never seems to go to one? Take them to an art ...


4

I have learned a lot working on my new answer to this question. I collected some literature and took some notes from them to add here. I hope this will satisfy the question. The average age of learning about ones owns the sexuality tendencies is 10, 14 for accepting the identity, talking about it with friends is 16 and 17 for talking to parents, well ...


4

It doesn't sound like the kids are doing anything age-inappropriate, or inappropriate in general. If you don't feel comfortable helping them playact "real dating" (movies, dinners, etc) then don't do it. I'd also advise you not to get hung up on whatever they want to call their time together. From what you've described, it doesn't sound much different ...


3

This is just an opinion based on your story as well as what is going on, but it might be helpful to spend some time with her doing something you're both comfortable with. Find something you all enjoy for a few hours and have fun. During said time, ask about how they feel about math etc. or what's going on in their life. Try and feel out where their head is. ...


3

I'm focusing on the concept of him stating "I don't deserve it" especially in an instance where the self-imposed punishment isn't directly related to the "crime" in question. So far the only punishment I impose is to send my children to their room to figure out what they did wrong and then, after a short time, to apologize to me or their sibling for what ...


3

I'm autistic and I do this too. It's not defiance or satisfaction at provoking the person or anything like that. It's completely involuntary and not associated with happiness at all. My impression is that many autistic people express emotions using different kinds of nonverbal signals than non-autistic people. For example, I once met a kid who showed ...


3

Have you asked her why she resists bedtime so much? By 10 she should be fully capable of discussing this on an adult level. Ask her. Don't do it during bedtime, at least at first (though later on that may be necessary to get all of the details). Don't do it in an accusatory way. Just ask: "Why don't you like going to bed?" If it started recently, ...


3

With an issue like this, I will always recommend professional counseling. Unlike other communication problems, the problems you're experiencing have a direct effect on the emotional and mental health of your children. A family therapist could help you learn to communicate with your wife about these manners, and how to handle her outbursts. Right now, your ...


3

When I was 10-12 years old, I often ended up in the situation of being awake in a hotel room with my parents when they were having sex. Aside from having to lie very still for a long while when I urgently needed to get up to use the toilet, it didn't hurt me. I was mostly concerned that my parents not know that I was lying there awake and listening (it was ...



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