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A child screaming during sleep can be quite disturbing. If the child is actually screaming loudly and perhaps thrashing, it could be what is known as night terrors. During these episodes, the child is not actually awake, though they sometimes appear to be due to the sound and movements not usually found during a sleep cycle. Since the child is not awake, it ...


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While I accept and agree with all the answers and comments here, that you can't make a straight line and set one rule for all kids all over the world, I wanted to add a photo recently found on the back of one of puzzle sets, by daughter got: It's just a mere suggestion (that must be always adjusted to each and every kid) and I don't know if there is any ...


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I have a few suggestions, and from how his behaviour is described when he sees his friends, there isn't an issue at school. It seems like he just doesn't want to walk, but instead of getting it done he wants to resist the activity. Bribery rarely fails; Children are usually very happy with even the simplest of rewards and little/often is the key. I can ...


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Find something that he really likes to do and that you can do at the school's gate while you are waiting. Make it clear that the sooner you arrive, the more time he will have for it. You'll probably have to leave home a few minutes earlier than you would otherwise need. You have to stress the fact that if you arrive late he won't have time for it, but that ...


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If he is not experiencing sluggishness in any other context, it would seem unlikely that that is it. Perhaps he is being lazy, seeking attention, or just amusing himself a bit. Even more likely, he is not really looking forward to starting the school day and is, in the way that doesn't seem so nonsensical to young children, "dragging his feet" a little bit ...


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One of my 4 year old twins "doesn't have any strength left" whenever he is told to do something he doesn't want to. This will disappear the moment he's distracted by something or someone he does like, just like your son. He may be feeling this physically or not, but it definitely starts in the mind. For my son, it's most often that he was deeply engaged in ...


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If he is smart enough to enjoy "why", then a really good approach I'd recommend would be to go through the various invasions of England (Vikings, Angles, Saxons, Jutes etc) and tie the various words back to language. Once you know the source, you can make very good guesses as to the rules for words you don't know.


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First, English is weird. From talking to a few people I know who had to learn English as a second language, it's pretty hard, especially compared to some others for the reasons your son has identified. Pronunciation rules aren't consistent. Spelling isn't consistent. Other languages (like Spanish, for instance) have well-defined rules about how spelling ...


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I would keep it simple and accurate: first of all 1) the language we use wasn't designed, nobody sat down and invented it, and 2) it's a hodge-podge/mongrel/mixture from a lot of different sources (other languages) over a lot of different time periods, thousands of years. If you need an illustration, you might locate some examples of "Olde Englishe" before ...


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ok... quite a few good answers here already. Still, putting my two cents worth in here. First of all, my own son (at 5.5 years old) has the same issue. So do quite a few kids in his class (though to a lesser extent I guess). He mirrors 'b', 'd', 'p', 'q', '3', '5' etc. Guess what? He's a natural lefty. He used to dominantly use his left hand, still kicks ...


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It is a very common problem. I've been to plenty of houses that looked like the way you described yours. But I think the problem has several causes: 1) Too many accessible toys. The bulk of the toys needs to be in an area or closet where kids cannot get to. Kids love unpacking so they'd unpack whatever they can put their hands on. If the toys are out of ...


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The trick my mother used was to draw a cute bumble bee on the palm of my left hand. Whenever I was confused, she would ask "Where is the bumble bee? Give him a 'hand hug'." A "hand hug" was closing my fingers over the bee and sticking my thumb up (makes a lower-case b shape). She said "if you can't hug a bee, then it must be a d (right hand)". It only ...



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