New answers tagged

1

First, mice may very well become obsolete by the time he grows up. Already, there's a generation of children entering school not even knowing what a mouse is. Nobody cares which hand you use on a touchscreen. The Apple Magic Touchpad is also handedness-agnostic: you use one finger to primary-click, and two fingers to secondary-click. For that matter, you ...


2

As a general rule, you should teach your child to live in the actual world. That means not needing to specifically adapt anything to his left handness. He will have to live in a world of right handed people, and mostly everything is built for right hand convenience. Things like writing, or using chopsticks are better left to his left hand, because that is ...


2

Another option might be getting a ambidextrous (excuse my poor spelling) mouse (a mouse that can be used with both hands), on which you can create profiles and preferably with a button to easily switch between the profiles (with a button on the mouse). This way you can do the button re-assignment with a click of a buttonon the mouse. However these kind of ...


8

I didn't start using a mouse until I was around 20 (yep, I'm old). I'm a lefty and suggest leaving mouse buttons alone, but physically moving the mouse to the left side of the keyboard. Keeping the buttons in their default settings will allow him to use other computers easily. One aid to learning would be to use a simple, flattish mouse, not an ergonomic ...


1

My report is similar to user20744's answer. We moved from spanish-speaking Argentina to english-speaking Canada when our daughters were 3.9 and 1.7 years old. While in Canada, we moved three times in the first 5 months. Completely painless to them, even with the 24+ hour trip and the inability to communicate with other kids for the first few months until ...


1

A friend of mine had this problem with her daughter. They solved it (though it took a while) by pretending her daughter was invisible when she was misbehaving. They remarked aloud that Sally was so loud they had to turn off their "Sally ears and eyes". In order to become visible again, she had to ask politely if she could be visible. It sounds silly, but ...


2

Sounds like you and your husband aren't providing consistent consequences for her actions. You try to discipline her. Your husband doesn't do anything (and it sounds like he might be undermining you). You and your husband need to sit down and figure out what the consequences should be when your daughter misbehaves. Your daughter wants what most everyone ...


2

We did this some years ago. As far as our son was concerned it was all an excellent adventure. He was too young to be sad about losing friends, and the airplane and airport were exciting and interesting. If you are flying then read the fine print on luggage allowances carefully. We were able to bring a full size suitcase and hand baggage as "his" luggage, ...


4

We also went through it with our kids, several times. Our first international move, from the U.S. to Peru, was when our oldest was 3.5 and our second had just turned 2. Then we moved from Peru back to the U.S. four years later, with a third child who'd been born in Peru and was just shy of 2 years old at the time of the move. In the 11 years since, we've ...


13

TL; DR: We've been through the same thing, and we tried to explain to my daughter what was going to happen ahead of time, without hiding anything. Overall, it was a painless process, and after a month in the new flat, she seems to have adapted to her new environment. We went through exactly the same situation a few months ago with my 2.5 year old daughter. ...


2

Try roleplaying with a toy or a doll. Play nursery, have a doll be her, one for the caregiver, a few "friends"... and then suddenly one friend is angry! Oh no, what happens? Kids often don't (want to) tell things, but when playing, use a mix of both fantasy and their own experiences to create situations. Ask follow up questions: why did the doll do that? ...


2

Maybe try talking to him about being brave and having courage. How he's a big boy now and he can be very brave, like a super hero that he may like. Do not make a big deal of the vaccinations, say it's 3 pinches, it will pinch for a little bit and it will be over soon. Reassure him that you'll be there with him and will hold him tight. Then you could ...


0

Try focusing a conversation or two around making her relaxed about the subject. She might be worried about the social consequences of "telling", backlash, maybe she actually likes the child who did it and they made up, who knows. You'll have to not just tell her it will be ok, but make her feel safe to tell you what she's worried about. This has to be ...


0

While i agree with most of the other answers (i.e. there are few if any objective arguments against immunizing) i think it would be more fair to stress the possible conflict between public health which is improved by immunisation programs, and individual risk. For example the Rubella virus is dangerous for pregnant women and unborns. Immunising girls ...


1

As this is happening primarily at school, it will mostly be up to the teacher to try to engage the child more. There's not a great deal you can do about it yourself. You could give a gentle reminder "now remember to listen carefully to your teacher", each morning when you drop her off at school. Don't push this too much though, just make it the last thing ...


3

I think this is just a cognitive skill that 3 year olds don't have yet. I also have a 3 year old son who remembers everything, even the most arcane details. But for him, it's all "yesterday". Which can be confusing when he says something happened yesterday, and we have to realize he means 3 weeks ago. He's just now (at almost 3 1/2) starting to try to ...


2

I will suggest what we do here in India for bright children. 1) put him in summer school for small kids 2) take him to zoo, museums, ancient places (like forts) , puppet show etc. Tell small stories around it. 3) importantly, tell him lots and lots of bedtime stories/tales from history, mythology, religion, scientists, mathematicians repackaged as small ...


0

Might I suggest not placing a child into school early. Supplement his education with extra-curricular activities by all means, but in my experience, doing well at school depends on having a certain level of maturity rather than being purely dependant on intellectual ability. In particular, in English classes in my final year at school, I had to write a ...


3

Sounds like you've got a bright child there, and it's good that you're thinking about these things early. Starting school ahead (i.e., starting kindergarten at 4 instead of 5) is something that is controversial, and it's unclear on what the right answer is. If it's something you're thinking about, I encourage you to do your own research on the matter. ...



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