Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I teach seventh grade (11 turning 12), and though the kids understand periods like months and years intellectually, many don't have an emotional feel for it. Any reward or punishment more than a week in the future is worthless. Anything more is so far in the future that it's insignificant compared to "now". If you want to help him grasp "one month", like ...


9

My seven year-old only differentiates time out to about a week. He understands longer time intervals, but just doesn't care. To him, if it's not until next week, it may as well be next year. My four year-old often still says "tomorrow" when she means "sometime in the future." However, if I press her, she will admit she didn't mean tomorrow tomorrow, she ...


-4

Children learn to read by writing. Stop trying to teach her to read and instead teach her to write. Maria Montessori, "The Secret of Childhood" (1963): “This was the greatest event to take place in the first Children’s Home. The child who first made the discovery was so astonished that he shouted out loud: ’I’ve written, I’ve written!’ ... It was ...


6

Toddlers and pre-schoolers do not have terribly long attention spans, generally speaking. 21 minutes (roughly the time of a half-hour show, minus commercial breaks) can be a long time for a kid to sit and follow uninterrupted dialog. In order to appeal to parents, shows targeting that age range will frequently try to work some sort of "edutainment" ...


6

When your child rebuts you that his statement is true, you simply need to point out that's not all that's required. The usual guideline for adults is: Is it true? Is it necessary? Is it kind? Gossip about a classmate fails the second two tests. Tattling can be considered ok under certain circumstances (are you telling me to get someone into trouble, or ...


12

From what I've heard from friends and acquaintances, it's pretty normal that a kid going to some kind of organized childcare (kindergarten, school, whatever) for the first time will get ill more often than usual; the reasoning behind this is that due to the many kids in one place, it's also easier to get viruses transmitted. The immune system of a kid who ...


6

It sounds like fairly normal behavior to me, but I think you're doing the right thing. At an early age, children might not yet understand when certain things aren't okay to say (That age is anywhere between 1 and 100, incidentally). The best way to address this is on a case-by-case basis, letting them know why it's rude to say what they've said, and to ...


2

I mostly agree with anongoodnurse's answer (+1 from me), and would add: Between 2 and 4 is the phase where children learn to deal with the frustration of not getting something they want, and where they can be very demanding, impulsive, and sometimes violent. However, that doesn't mean they are evil or mean. They just have to learn how to do that thing ...


8

Toddlers this age (and younger) bite. That's just a fact. Most of them outgrow it fairly unceremoniously. They bite for a number of reasons, three of which are 1) reaction, 2) attention, and 3) frustration. Usually this frustration stems from not being able to "use their words" to adequately express their frustration. To combat this, show him all the time ...



Top 50 recent answers are included