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1

I also wanted to chime in and say that my 5 year old stepson sounds exactly the same as yours. We had behaviour psychologist look at his behaviour and temperament for a sudden change in his behaviour due to an unrelated hyperactivity problem. Luckily the hyperactivity is now manageable through the coaching we received from the specialists we saw, and when ...


3

What I've found to be successful is not to try to proactively teach artistic skills, but to model skill for my preschooler. Either by myself constructing the craft/drawing the picture/etc. alongside him (or just in front of him), or by having him next to other, older children who are by nature of age better at the crafts. That leads him to both want to ...


3

As adults, we're often concerned with doing things "the right way", and while technique and practice are certainly critical to mastering watercolor (or pottery, drawing, sculpting or any other art form), they aren't likely to be appreciated by a 5 year old. Kids that age are curious, relatively restless, energetic and enthusiastic, with creativity mostly ...


1

I think expecting tact from a 4 year old is kind of futile. Children that age only have the most limited ability to take another person's perspective. For example, most kids can't tell the difference between irony and literal statements until around 7-8 years old. Your son probably doesn't have the capacity yet to understand the difference between lying and ...


1

I can't diagnose someone over the internet, but it's possible he might be on the autistic spectrum. Repetitive speech patterns, spacing out, taking things literally, and poor memory are all common features of autistic kids - as is having an uneven pattern of strengths and weaknesses. Does he have trouble making friends? Does he show other kinds of ...


10

Ask yourself: How do children experience their world? Most languages have words like "grasp", that mean to understand something and to touch it. Good schools/educators try to incorporate as many sensory channels and as many different ways to teach as possible. In my child's primary school letters and numbers are taught by having the children walk the ...


1

I think this totally depends on your vision about how to raise children, it seems impossible for us to answer to me. Note that having to cure your kid when it gets ill isn't always the best option. What I mean is: If your kid gets serious ill and neets antibiotics, it will cure him (which is good), but the antibiotics kill the "good germs" in the intestines ...


1

It's not unusual behaviour for younger children. My 3 year old sometimes cries when she's dropped off at play-school, but is generally fine a while afterwards. Children often cry when the parent leaves, but usually get over it pretty quickly. I would suggest leaving, then watching through a crack in the door for 5 minutes or so to see how they get on.


1

Most likely they just need time. My daughter was very much like that at age four, to the point where she wouldn't speak a single word to anyone the entire time. She is now five and a half, and you would never be able to tell she used to be that way. Some kids just take a little longer than others, especially when they spend most of their time with their ...


5

This has to be one of the most painful parts of parenting. It's good that the teachers are contacting you**; having Cain's parents sit in, though, while very important for Cain and his parents, is not much of an action plan. What are the school's written policies? All schools should have one in place; even in preschool. Ask to read it. Bullying often ...


3

Ouch. This is difficult. First, the good points: you have the school on your side, they are responding appropriately, and it sounds like Cain is being progressed through a proper disciplinary sequence. You might ask the school about that: they should have a written policy. I understand that you want to send the right messages to your son. I would suggest ...


1

It might be a good idea to play in the bath at home. Light splashing can have a good effect on decreasing the fear of water. Next step would be making bubbles under water without putting head under if the child is too scared to do so. If that is the case try putting some water in hands and then make splashing bubbles together with your son. If you show him ...


4

So, let's first agree that you can't instruct a child how to behave. It's often difficult to instruct an adult. The question was what are the tools to influence child's behavior. Here they are: personal example, role play, storytelling, training (just like you train dogs;)), consequences. Let's have a closer look how these tools can be applied in the ...


1

I think it is better to wait. Generally, kids develop competence when they are 5 years and older. My daughter is 6 and she never wanted to swim before and all of a sudden she is talking about learning to swim. When I asked her why she wants to learn, she says some of her friends are already in level 2 swimming and others are in level 1 and she wants to ...


4

It seems to be fairly common for boys of that age to start getting disruptive. (Not that girls can't be disruptive too, but it's less common for girls to directly act out that way - http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/marianne.bertrand/research/papers/the%20trouble%20with%20boys.pdf ) It's good that you are addressing the problem early. Having the report card ...


0

No it's not a problem. She's getting enough sleep. She's active when she's awake. And she's happy when she sleeps. There are many places in the world where her afternoon-nap-late-to-bed pattern applies to adults too! Obviously, it might be a 'social' problem if she is supposed to be at school and awake. But (I'm biased), that's a problem with society, ...



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