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1

For both questions about fees and quality, the answer is "It depends...". The better non-Montessori schools can reasonably be expected to surpass lower quality Montessori schools. Also, parents and home cultures might better complement one style or the other. It's very difficult for someone who is remote to give any certain answer. A well run Montessori ...


1

My experience with Montessori schools is all second hand. I have one friend whose kid was not doing well in a traditional school but thrived in a Montessori school. I know another person who started their kid in a Montessori and it just did not work out so transferred to a traditional school. Montessori schools are not better, just different. I know a ...


0

Yes, I say go for it, send your kid to Montessori school. Most schooling stifle's a child's natural curiosity for learning, whereas Montessori school will help your child find their "niche" more easily, i.e. do they like to do things with their hands, such as Julia Child (who is a product of Montessori education). The long-term benefits outweigh any costs ...


0

I think it is perfectly normal even if your kid isn't interested in playing with toys. Bouncing on sofas is something I can relate to since my son (who is now 7 years old) does it on a daily (or sometimes even hourly) basis still! What I would suggest is that you should try and engage him elsewhere. Something I used to keep my son occupied when he was around ...


0

The problem here is the concept of positive reinforcement, but what you do here is to accidentally "punish" your son with your rewards. The concept of "You may only watch TV after you cleaned up your toys" does not present watching TV as a reward, but cleaning up as a punishment and lowers watching TV to a regular activity. You are basically saying "You ...


0

It is hard to tell from the little information. There can be several reasons for this: Your son did not have enough chances to experience social interaction to learn the fun or had several rather traumatic (from the perspective of a child) experiences. You might want to talk to him and try to figure out what really bothers him. If he just doesn't value it, ...


8

Sounds like he's a social kid with a lot of energy. How often does he go out to see other kids? How often does he get outside? My almost-three year old does play with toys, but he's honestly happier 'bouncing around' or outdoors. Kids are unique, and some tend more towards imaginative play with toys, while some tend towards social play. Overall, it ...


1

This is as much a problem with adults as children. Think of your work situation. You start the year, your boss (implicitly or explicitly) says "Do a good job this year and you will get a raise". Twelve months later, you're told you didn't do a good enough job and don't get a raise. Alternately, your boss has a list of goals, and periodically discusses ...


3

At that age, leading by example is still very effective. We all experience her emotions and when thing seem hopeless, even adults cry. The only real difference is the ability to think critically about a situation and ask ourselves how it can be appropriately addressed. Now, the academic analysis aside, here's what I did with my daughter: I identified ...


1

One thing to consider, in addition to the other points of view here, is that children do perform better if they're older relative to other children in their grade, on average. The UK for example did a study on students' attainment of key goals by birth month, and found that at age 5, there was a 2.6% gap between fall-born children and summer-born children ...


1

It's tricky. Imagine the child wants a toy that is in a different, unacessible, location. You can try saying "Oh dear! Do you want TOYNAME? Is that why you are unhappy?" The child might stop crying for long enough to say "yes, that's what I want." Often just acknowledging the problem is enough to stop crying. But if it doesn't stop you can say things ...


3

+1 as the same problem I had! You spoke my words ;) But here, my daughter is 8 (and this problem still persists though it has become less frequent now!). Okay, the problem of crying. Young ones often get disappointed or frustrated if the things don't work their way. On the other hand, it's not possible for parents to fulfill every wish they wish! The ...


5

Crying generally involves a lot of noise. So in situations where the noise is not acceptable due to time, place, etc, it's certainly reasonable to tell the child that they need to stop crying, or you might have to take them to a place where it would be acceptable for them to cry. Of course one should recognize that there are injuries and hurts that are ...


3

You ask the child to say in words how they feel and what's wrong. You let them know that it is fine to feel like that and that their emotions are valid. Then you talk about how to overcome the problem, and maybe how to avoid it in future. Then you give them a hug (hopefully when the crying has stopped) and help them start what ever they're doing next.


8

We mostly only ask one of our children to stop crying, and that's because he will literally keep going for hours if we don't. Most children get it out of their systems in a couple minutes and move on, at least for crying about something that happened in the past and is done, not an ongoing condition like being tired or sick. At a certain point, crying ...


2

The initial goal should be simply using the potty. This creates a strong positive connection to the desired behavior, that is easy for the child to comprehend. I'd also recommend the reward be some sort of short, focused time with the parent - can be a game of patty cake, reading them a very short book. It's both relatively "free" and they can never eat too ...


2

I got lucky when it came to potty training. All I had to do was ask her and she did it. Wow! Other tasks weren't so easy, though. I don't recall what it was I was try to teach her, but this is what I did and what I hope will help you by my sharing it. First, I would recommend not calling it "an accident". The reason being is that we all naturally want ...


1

Teach your child to protest loudly. A loud "no! don't bite me!" should be enough, and if it isn't, it should get the teacher's attention. Pushing away is also good, but why is he only doing it "weakly"? What did the teacher say when you addressed this?



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