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100

Kids that age learn a lot by imaginative play. It's how they make sense of the world and experiment with different responses to events. Pretending to be an adult is very common. Playing along is a good opportunity to show empathy and teach better responses. You might say, I'm Eric. I'm sad because I couldn't find my toy. I wonder if I should cry or ask ...


99

In my experience, he often doesn't know himself what he means. I've heard a lot of four-year-olds ask "Why?" ad infinitum -- sometimes it's just a way of saying, "Tell me more." I would suspect that for most four-year-olds, asking "Why?" is a way of trying to learn more about the things around them, but I think that they are often looking for a simple ...


31

Step 1: See a dentist, have cavities treated asap. Yes, these teeth will fall out, but until then, they act as placeholders for the permanent teeth. There are also sources that claim the deciduous teeth are important for the development of the permanent teeth. (Which will start to appear at around five to seven, that's quite different between kids.) And ...


28

Often the solution here is as simple as reframing the request. So if he is playing with blocks and it's time to leave for school, no matter how much advance notice you give and no matter that you leave for school at the same time every day, when you announce "time to leave for school!" he may well resist and refuse and generally push back. So try asking ...


26

It tells just how much he sees you as role model. Instead of seeing this as abnormal you should be the role model he deserves. Other than that do understand that this behaviour will stop after some time. You only need to worry if this does not stop and causes complications. Hope I helped. P.S.: When I was a child I used to wear my father's army uniform. ...


20

My experience is that, yes, first of all, a small child's "Why?" is usually "Please keep talking." However, I have also found that sometimes they do have particular questions, and that they learn to ask clearer questions if you help them realize that there are many possible questions. While it probably won't work the first time, try offering them options ...


15

A 3-year old should be able understand that you are sick and that something hurts - unless you have an exceptionally healthy child he should have experienced this himself. You need to explain what hurts and what you need to do or can't do. Repeat the explanation as often as needed: You can't do X because your back hurts a lot. This is actually a good ...


14

At the age you're talking about, teacher:student ratio seems more important than student count. If the larger class you're looking at has a poorer ratio, I wouldn't choose that (absent other reasons for choosing). Teacher to student ratio of 1:8 is a reasonable ratio at 3; at 2.5 I'd say it's even a little low. 2.5 year olds want - need - attention from ...


14

TL; DR: We've been through the same thing, and we tried to explain to my daughter what was going to happen ahead of time, without hiding anything. Overall, it was a painless process, and after a month in the new flat, she seems to have adapted to her new environment. We went through exactly the same situation a few months ago with my 2.5 year old daughter. ...


13

I don't know if it's the case for you, but one thing I see a lot of parents of strong-willed children do repeatedly is ask a question, then get frustrated when the child answers in the negative. If a negative answer is not acceptable, then don't ask a question! Reserve questions for when you are honestly okay with any response. Bad: Do you want to go ...


12

Ask yourself: How do children experience their world? Most languages have words like "grasp", that mean to understand something and to touch it. Good schools/educators try to incorporate as many sensory channels and as many different ways to teach as possible. In my child's primary school letters and numbers are taught by having the children walk the ...


12

I'm not a parent myself, but two points: 1) You could argue that no, it's not just 'cute'. Imagining yourself in someone else's position is the very basis of empathy and all that is worthwhile in humanity :-) 2) Describing himself in the third person, from the POV of you or someone else, can sometimes be a mechanism to put distance between himself and ...


12

We have a 3.5 year old with a similar problem. We took him to a dentist who gave us a $2000+ recommendation, 4 root canals. We went to get a second opinion. The second dentist suggested we do the following: No sugar. This means no juice, no chocolate milk, no candy, etc. Brush after each meal, make certain the decaying teeth get brushed. This can be hard ...


12

Based on the additional information provided in the comments and to paraphrase the question: You are concerned that an unknown male parent in a public park and with their own child of a similar age might abduct/harm your child from right under your nose while you are watching them play a game that has no inappropriate content whatsoever. All this while ...


10

I suffer from some chronic pain issues, which occasionally make it impossible or very uncomfortable for me to get down and play with my son, who is just over 2 years old. My wife has also had some issues, recently. She sprained her foot during her last trimester, and just delivered our second son and has quite a few tender spots. The solution we use with ...


10

--- Disclaimer: Some might feel this answer to be hard to digest. --- Have you ever thought about what is happening in your kid's brains while they are watching TV? I mean, from a neuroscientistic perspective? Basically a fireworks of impressions without any chance to influence what is happening. A child in front of TV will absorb a flood of pictures, ...


10

I didn't start using a mouse until I was around 20 (yep, I'm old). I'm a lefty and suggest leaving mouse buttons alone, but physically moving the mouse to the left side of the keyboard. Keeping the buttons in their default settings will allow him to use other computers easily. One aid to learning would be to use a simple, flattish mouse, not an ergonomic ...


9

But, he's been asked to be the ring bearer in my cousin's wedding. If we accept, the event is going to require a suit. No, it shouldn't be if you accept, it should be if he accepts. If you haven't, then do tell him about the occasion and then do tell him in detail what exactly is he going to do there. Tell him that he can't back out if he says yes ...


8

Have you had her evaluated to see if she has any sensory issues? Sensory disorder can cause issues with clothing, as the clothes can feel extremely uncomfortable. If you think this might be the issue, try seeing if the few clothing items she can tolerate have anything in common, and build on that. Some general guidelines that commonly help are: Super ...


8

It could be that the open-ended question of "what do you want to eat" is too difficult for him, and listing everything in the cupboard is overwhelming. See if he could more easily answer a choice type of question like "do you want peas or broccoli? and with that do you want rice or pasta? And if he still doesn't answer, provide him with a variety (4 or 5) ...


8

I personally would choose the smaller over the larger group for small children. Social interaction always occurs between a few children at a time. Admittedly, the choice of "friends" is somewhat reduced in smaller classes, but there are significant benefits: More attention from the teacher. Even the best teacher can only spend on average [time per school ...


7

If my son asked me why water was transparent, I'd honestly not be able to answer him. I think I'd have to say something like "I honestly don't know. Now you mention it, I'd like to know that myself. Shall we try and find out together?" Make it kind of a fun science challenge.


7

Many. But which exactly greatly depends on your child and his experiences so far. Some suggestions: Death is final Really. If you are four you haven't necessarily made that experience yet. Families are smaller and live apart, neighbourhoods less connected than a few generations ago. First-hand experience with death is rare even for adults. Death is ...


7

If there's one thing you should be worried about it's that your daughter is put in such a class and you were apparently not even aware of it... I find it really strange. But learning a second language is best done when you're young. Living in a bilingual country (Belgium), this is actually the direction towards a lot of schools/parents are moving: bilingual ...


7

I don't know if you have this option but an alternative to nursery is to find a child minder. In the UK we have Ofsted registered childminders who are childcare professionals. Being registered with Ofsted means they are regularly inspected and will have a grading that you can assess them by. Childminders deal with smaller numbers of children (at most 5 or ...


6

Usually, kids tends to accept change better if they're prepared and know what will come. I would then go that way and expose the short-term planning to him : now you can play there, but in 30 minutes we'll be going to the pool, then to the movie. Once at the pool, be a bit more accurate : around 3PM we'll be going out the pool and go to the movie, and so on. ...


6

"Why" is a semi-specific invitation to interact and to teach The child is saying, to paraphrase: "Please talk to me about the water. In addition, please bring in other interesting topics related to the water which I may or may not be aware of yet. I am in a mood to learn. Also, I like it when you engage with me verbally because it makes me feel happy ...


6

As the man of the house you sometimes have to make unpopular decisions that are best for the family. If it's the best decision for your family, then that's what it is. Don't feel like a failure, feel like a good father. Plans don't often work out the way they need to, be thankful that you have the means to put your child in nursery, some families cannot and ...


6

What you have described is well within the standards for child abuse. I am the first to encourage disciplining a child, even spanking, but this should never be done in anger. What I tell my children is that if they are angry, they should not even touch the other person. An adult should know better. By your own accounts, she has twice now inflicted ...


6

I found one source that claims 14 to 18 months for long-lasting memory, though without defining "long-lasting". Remembering comes on various levels, though: Specific Daddy turned to page 134. General Daddy read me The Phantom Tollbooth Abstract Daddy read me stories Experiential I loved my time with daddy Ask yourself this: Why will ...



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