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This is how I finally got my son to ride a bike: Found a gentle grass slope. Started at the top with the pedals removed and the seat low enough so that he could rest his feet on the grass. Sent him down a few times and gradually raised the saddle so his feet were off the ground. Once he had his balance I put the pedals back, so he could now freewheel down ...


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In my experience, while certain pedagogical ideas appeal to me more than others, the personality of those who implement them is at least as important as the underlying ideas. I learned most about a kindergarten by just walking up to their garden's fence on a sunny afternoon and watching the caretakers interact with the children. Do that at both kindergartens ...


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I'm not sure anyone other than you could really say what your son specifically would be a good fit for, but Waldorf (and similarly at this stage, Montessori) schools are likely a good fit for an active child, as they encourage that activity and the learning that comes from it. I'll leave out the discussion of the benefits/drawbacks of Waldorf in general and ...


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In my opinion this is very common behavior. He probably wants to both be part of what B does, and maybe to retaliate. Our 3 year old does this quite common to his little brother, 13 months old. He still love his little brother, I and I bet A loves B a lot still. Does A share well with kids his own age? At 4, he is probably used to having some 'discussion' ...


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I see two main components here to address. The first is that he's getting upset easily. This doesn't seem too unusual for a three year old, especially if getting upset like this sometimes results in his getting one-on-one attention some of the time. With a 10 month old in the house, it is possible some of this is jealousy, and deliberately ...


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This is pretty common at that age, although to different degrees with different children. The basic approach to take is validate the emotion and correct the behavior. Validating the emotion means to communicate that their feelings are being heard and acknowledged. This article explains many different ways to do that. Usually with a small child, it takes ...


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My son has the same issue. He is fine with using a pen or paint and likes school work, but refuses to use crayons. He screams and cries. After a lot of research and questioning, I found out that some people apparently have sensory issues where the feeling of a wax crayon or the feeling of a crayon against a piece of paper is intolerable for them. Also, I ...


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#1, #2 and #7, three you haven't done, are what made the BIG difference for our little girl (2 years old). #8 really depends on your definition of criticising/punishing, but certainly whatever you do, don't be angry about it. We don't discipline for toiletting accidents. Toiletting is now entirely her responsibility. We assist her for aspects she cannot ...



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