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54

She goes to my mom and dad if I yell at her or if I say "No." Then I get in trouble. But that's not the point. Actually, that is the point. Especially considering: I don't want her to hate me like my mother and I hate one another It sounds like your parents aren't letting you be your daughter's parent. This is a major problem. You need to sit ...


38

As an atheist, how should I explain theism to my children? Treat all religions the same way: explain that they exist, and that you don't believe in them, but you do believe that everybody should make up his own mind on what to believe / believe in. As a non-believer, this can be hard to pull off without sounding dismissive toward the concept of religion ...


33

First off, your interaction with your toddler is totally common (I would say it's borderline universal, actually). Toddlers that age love to push boundaries. I would say two things - the first is, don't sweat it so much. If your kid only eats crap, let it happen. They're seriously not going to be a 20 year old who only eats chicken nuggets. Hitting and ...


29

11 to 9:30 is ten and a half hours, which is plenty of sleep. My kids are up at 6:30, and go to sleep at about 8:30. I think that if you want to adjust her schedule, I would start by waking her up earlier.


29

I think you are reading too much into it. Your three-your-old calmed herself down and contented herself with quiet play instead of napping. She is playing with dolls because that's what many three-year-olds do. And while she wasn't napping, she was having quiet play which is a restful alternative. The ability to entertain oneself is an important life skill!


26

My answer is going to be a simple one: Teach them why you believe what you believe, and let them make up their own mind This will have the additional benefit of teaching them to think critically in general.


22

We take pictures or scan images to save digitally. We also have a set amount of space for saving artwork and crafts, a flat box about the size of a pizza box and a small shelf in her room. When those spaces get full, we weed some things out. I've found with my child that after she has had a little distance from her creations she is able to let go more ...


21

You should only let the child pull it out themselves (or leave it to fall out when it is ready if the child doesn't want to pull it). If you try to pull it out you may cause pain or injury to the child. Edit to add: letting it fall out by itself is fine - what would be bad about that? The more ready it is, the less pain and bleeding there will be.


20

That's actually for the kids to decide I think. As long as they're having fun and generally not objecting or letting you know they'd rather bathe alone, I think it's perfectly fine.


19

One answer could be a serious reaction to mock-choking. What would you do if your child really choked on food? You'd probably act fast and not in an entirely funny manner. Also, you'd have a seriously concerned face. "This time it looked like you really were choking! I was afraid!" The important point is to be serious, not mock-serious. Also, does he know ...


19

The /r/ sound is quite complex to produce and requires refined oral motor skills. It is often one of the last developing sounds in children. As a speech language pathologist, I work with many children who have difficulty with this sound. Because it's a later developing sound, using another sound such as the /l/ for it at 3 years of age is considered ...


19

With our 3.5 year old son, we do this by making sure he knows that he won't get to do the next thing until he puts away his toys. Want to watch TV? Put away your toys. Want to eat some snack food? Put away toys. Play hide and seek (his favorite game) or get thrown onto the bed? Put away your toys. Once he believed us, that he wasn't going to get away ...


19

My guess is that she has memorized the number sequence, but hasn't actually made the correlation between the words and the actual amount of things. This a big leap. Have her practice counting as much as you can, but make it fun and incorporated into daily life as much as possible. Like, when giving snacks "here's one slice of orange, now you have two orange ...


18

A few ideas: Start with yourself You're at your wit's end. You need to fix that as best you can. You're not a failure. You may have lost some battles, but you're haven't lost the war. Remind yourself that this phase won't last forever, and that you will get through it. Look after yourself. Make sure you're sleeping, eating etc. properly and that you have ...


17

No, there is no way to safely do what you describe. Please keep your children in their seatbelts and child seats at all times. I understand what you're trying to achieve, but even if you find a working solution, the risks are immense. Sitting upright with a relaxed head in a collision is safe. So to speak, if the head has already fallen forward before you ...


17

One, no slapping. Besides being very unpleasant it is counter-productive and will make the problem worse. The reason your nephew is misbehaving this way is because he gets attention. You have a problem because there's little you can do yourself, parenting must come from the mother and father. The problem is he's getting lots of the wrong kind of attention ...


17

Many good tips in other answers, to which I would add: bring entertainment (a restaurant meal is longer to sit through than one at home) treat it as a discovery experience (count the tables, find the bathroom, see how many times the word "cheese" is in the menu, try to guess people's names or how you think they might be related) teach and compliment their ...


17

While each child is unique, there are some commonly observed sexual behaviors typical for a 5 year old child (so called Normative Behavior) and some behavior that is of a concern (Symptomatic Behavior). The following wikipedia article describes some of these behaviors: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_sexuality#Normative_and_non-normative_behaviors The ...


17

From what you describe, it sounds like you're making a huge and sensible effort to be a good parent. I think you would do well in a situation where you are not overruled. But it's clear from your description that your parents are overruling your parenting decisions, and this is the thing that causes you the most grief. This is what you should work on -- ...


16

I don't think there's a universal definition. Going by the American Academy of Pediatrics: Baby = 0 - 1 year (Sometimes called "Infant" in other sources) Toddler = 1 - 3 years (Some still consider young toddlers to be 'babies') Preschooler = 3 - 5 years Gradeschooler = 5 - 12 years (Sometimes called 'school age' in other sources) Clothing ...


15

If it's a full-time nanny I'm assuming it's inside your own home. You have to understand your home also belongs to your child and although in the real world we have to deal with all sorts of people we don't like to be around people we don't like in our own home. This can be a significant cause of stress and a reason that your child is reacting so ...


15

My son (now 8) also did not want to color! I think it takes a certain kind of personality to be able to sit there and perform all these small repetitive motions over a long period of time. My son was an active kid who was pragmatic in his own way: he would much rather draw pictures from scratch himself, whether it is with crayons or paint. He just didn't ...


14

As a counter-point to @9000's suggestion, try ignoring him completely (assuming you can tell the difference between mock and not!). Most behaviours such are a method of garnering attention. But whatever you do, only choose one course of action, don't confuse him by switching between the two.


14

Same with my oldest boy lately, he can spend hours (if we let him) eating one bite. We just figure it's some sort of control issue or something with him and basically have just set a time for him to eat, if he doesn't want to finish or eat a lot then he needs to wait until the next meal. If he is really hungry either he can have water, or something healthy ...


14

I understand death of a parent can happen to any child, but is it right to pretend we don't know what's coming? Unless your kids are incredibly dense, they are going to figure it out sooner or later, and probably sooner. The only question is where are they going to get their information from. I was diagnosed with MS two years ago when my kids were 7, ...


13

Time to buy a money box/'piggy bank' We bought our son a Thomas the Tank Engine money box and we often randomly give him the small change from local shopping trips. He enjoys putting the coins into his money box and pretending to count the money occassionally. Now, when we go shopping and he latches onto something he likes the look of, we simply ask "okay, ...


13

Refusing to play with someone is a very common behavior. Most of the time there is nothing alarming to worry about. A four years old child is a complete human being with mind and heart. Children always have reasons for their actions. The first step is to examine the child’s relationships with others, children and adults. Find out if anyone has denied the ...


13

Yes, it's uncomfortable. No, it's not a concern. My personal experience (having traveled many thousands of km/miles in the summertime as a child) is that high temperatures while driving is not a serious concern. When you don't have A/C, then your best defense against heat is to be smart: Passengers will be thirsty. Bring lots of drinking water, but avoid ...


13

It's about choice. It's not that he doesn't want a bath, it's that he wants to say when he has a bath. That's not possible of course, but one way that seems to work with my 3 year old is to ask "do you want your bath before x, or after x", that way he has some choice. I'm amazed how well this tends to work. What you have to remember is that children are as ...



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