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44

Not to take the fun out of devising your own experiment, but the fine fluid dynamics physicists at the Splash Lab (at Brigham Young University) are trying to figure out how to prevent urinal splash-back right now! Fluid dynamics scientists (calling themselves the "wizz kids") set up a water tank and nozzles (emitting colored water) to mimic the natural ...


22

First, any fast moving stream of anything with mass is going to splatter when it hits something else -- it's really all about the angles (source & target) and velocity as to where it goes during the impact. Toilets are shaped differently, too, with some longer, shorter, taller, etc. You're potty training though -- not refining bathroom skills. Most ...


18

A few people have touched upon this (he says sarcastically) but the best way to reduce it is by sitting down. An increasing number of men are sitting when they use the toilet as it's supposed to be more hygienic (as there isn't urine all over the place). I beleive Sweden and Japan are a couple examples of this. Failing that, don't tell him where to aim, but ...


9

Since toddlers (and babies) have been (and still are in various other cultures) potty trained this young and younger, apparently without a problem, The missing word here is some - some toddlers have been potty trained this young. Every child is different. Potty training combines two completely different developmental aspects: Physiological - ...


8

That sounds perfectly normal! You might wait a few months before trying again, giving your daughter time to adjust to all the change she is experiencing. Give her time to grow into her role as big sister before you start toilet training again. When you start again, don't try to do toilet training and binky separation at the same time. A binky, like ...


8

According to a recent study, the optimal way to reduce toilet splash (besides sitting down) is to: drop a few pieces of tissue into a toilet bowl to soften the blow. For a urinal: stand slightly to one side, and aim downwards at a low angle of impact


6

It may not be the answer you want and it will probably get down voted but the best thing you can do is to move back in together and try a lot harder to make your marriage work.


6

Bed wetting, even at 7 years old, is common. About 1 in 40 children at that age wet the bed. Children usually grow out of it. Stop waking her in the night. That doesn't help. Make sure she is drinking plenty in the day time. This will help her train her bladder. She should reduce the amount she drinks in the evenings. Make going to the loo last thing ...


5

I personally think that having a three year-old clean up his own feces would not be a good idea; too much opportunity to make a mess or create an association that the potty is negative. I have a great deal of luck following the Incredible Years theories when potty training my two boys. I participated in several parent groups through Head Start. What I ...


5

First: In times of frustration about your child, always remember the parental mantra: It's just a phase. It will pass. (And be replaced by the next "phase"...) :) Don't despair, don't become impatient. You still have more than 80% of the time necessary for raising this child ahead of you. In a few years you will look back at the current phase and ...


5

Here's my attempt: You messed up your relationship (I'm not criticizing it, BTW, I'm just stating a fact) and that obviously troubles your daughter. If you feel like you cannot fix your relationship, all you can do is to try to minimize the negative effects this has on your daughter. If I was in your place, I'd start out by asking myself why she behaves ...


5

You may simply be too soon. Usually 22 to 30 months is considered the "standard" age. With Our first daughter, we tried to "push it", and it turned into a horrible, long drawn out mess. On the flip side, we didn't force the issue with our second daughter. Then a few days before Preschool, we realized she hadn't yet learned. Our oldest said "No Problem ...


4

Generally speaking, I believe intrinsic motivation is always stronger and more lasting than extrinsic, and entails fewer risks (e.g. feeling entitled to rewards for routine tasks). Extrinsic vs. intrinsic motivation is touched upon in Why should children be rewarded for good behaviour? and How do I deal with a child that refuses to do a chore or task? ...


4

My younger son struggled with night-time wetting until he was 14. In his younger years, we weren't too worried about it; I had several friends who assured me he would grow out of it. He was a VERY heavy sleeper, and even if I went in to wake him for a bathroom break in the middle of the night, he didn't really wake up. I actually stopped doing that after I ...


4

As the parent to a withholder (from 6 months to 2.5 years!) you have my sympathy, but I must stress to you that it's vital that you completely back off the pressure right now. She absolutely has to be 100% comfortable pooing first and foremost - and as inconvenient as it is if that is in her pants, THAT is where she needs to poo. Holding poo in can cause ...


4

She's not quite ready. Keep her in a nappy for the next few months. Do keep the potty around and encourage her to sit on it, and get used to it, but keep the nappies on for now. My toddler was the same. We were convinced that by some trick we'd make her understand the peeing thing. She didn't... then one day she just got it. I don't think it was anything we ...


4

DISCLAIMER: I don't care if this gets down voted to the basement in hell, if it helps one other person, hopefully the OP, then I'm satisfied. This is advice I never thought anyone on this planet would ever be unlucky enough to need, honestly. Moderators feel free to delete it if you feel so inclined. My son had this same problem. In fact, just tonight, he ...


4

In addition to some of the great advice offered here, I would recommend: don't change her home. Separating parents will often play ping pong with their kids - pass the kids back and forth between Mom and Dad's home. This can be very frustrating for a child because they don't have a place to call home anymore. I've seen parents who treat the home where they ...


4

You are clearly an organized and intentional parent and have instilled discipline into your child (great!), yet your child is suddenly acting up. It sounds like you need to work on your marriage more than your parenting. I'm sorry if that sounded insensitive, or maybe even off-topic, but it's important to understand that a 3-year-old's entire universe is ...


4

anyone ever tried putting a mist of water inside the toilet bowl? Just a spray that starts when someone stands in front of it, maybe downward from the top of the back of the bowl under the rim. The droplets would knock down any splatter.


4

Ah potty training: the endless struggle. We found scheduling regular potty breaks helped with our 2.5 year old girl, because she did the same thing as your son. We tried to have roughly 6 schedules potty breaks throughout the day. Unfortunately, if your son is a human child then there is a 99% chance of this also becoming a battle ground. Our daughter did ...


4

First off, try to avoid forcing things as much as possible. If worst comes to worst, go back to diapers/pullups; we did this at one point, and survived. It is possible your child is simply not ready for potty training; some aren't at 3. More likely, though, going back temporarily would allow you to reset some of the issues - the 'battleground', so to ...


4

My wife is the school nurse at an outdoor school (sixth grade camp) and this problem is very common among the sixth graders (10-11 year olds) she sees. They've developed procedures so these kids can attend successfully without the other kids knowing. As annoying as this is, it will pass. Adding shame, even unintentionally, will help nothing and hurt a lot. ...


3

I think every child is different and every home is different. Having a method to follow as a guide is good, but ultimately you need to adjust the method based on your child and your own busy life style. When I potty trained my daughter (who is now 3 and has been potty trained since ~2.5) I too read these "methods" online that promise you can train your kid ...


3

My 3rd child was really stubborn, I ended up getting a large shoe box and filling it with dollar store toys as a reward treasure box. It did work eventually! All kids are different as far as their response to rewards. if your child suffers from anxiety, then rewards can be a trigger for anxiety.


3

I think you should wait a bit. Ideally, your child should come to see you right after soiling his diaper to get it changed. We tried very hard to potty-train my second daughter, but it only worked when she would come see us to get a diaper when she was naked and needed to pee. Before that moment, she wasn't ready. That was at about 30 months old, by the ...


3

The only answer you can really get is "as long as it takes". Every child is different. I know boys who trained in a weekend, and boys who took months or even years. Some of the difference has to do with whether you wait until the child is completely ready (physically and mentally). 17 months is early-ish, though certainly some children to train that ...


3

I read the book, however, my kido took almost a fortnight to get used to it. "HOW TO" books do not consider the individual personality types.


3

When aiming at the bowl instead of the water, note that the shape of the bowl makes a big difference. To be precise, a steeper angle of the surface being hit creates less splash-back. This is why anon's answer mentions "near the rim" - the sides of the bowl are the steepest. We're teaching our boys to sit down for any business, except in nature and in ...


3

Being a male and owning a penis for as long as I can remember, I have found that aiming here is most efficient for minimal ricocheting



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