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11

You have my sympathy. Having one child with encopresis is awful. I can't really imagine accurately what it's like to have two children with this problem. Parents of children with idiopathic constipation often blame themselves and their toilet training problems (which were often present). First a quick reassurance: a rectal examination finding stool in the ...


6

By age 7, the social ramifications of wearing a diaper are huge. This isn't the sort of thing the other kids at his school haven't noticed. If he hasn't started using the toilet after a couple of months around other kids, this isn't just stubbornness or your failure to win out, something is wrong. I've only run across a few cases of children this age who ...


5

At some point, children start doing everything they can come up with in order to stay out of bed the longest they can. Drink, eat, hug, pee, poo, light, change diaper - that was our daughter's list. She requested all those things in random order every evening; sometimes we complied, sometimes not - until we said enough. There is only one thing to do: you ...


4

I don't have any experience with potty training a special needs child, but I have potty trained three boys, and even though they are normal (developmentally anyway) it was very frustrating at times, and we had our brushes with total madness as well. So, in that respect, it appears potty training is progressing normally for you. Hang in there, your child ...


4

If your toddler is not producing enough urine to show up in the toilet, it probably isn't going to make much difference in terms of making sure their bladder is empty before a car trip or bed time. If you are concerned about rewarding the child for peeing in the potty, I suggest you trust them if they say they've gone (unless they have a pattern of not ...


4

As a mother of three (for 20 years) and daycare provider for over 10 years here is the best way that I can answer this, and any other potty training/diaper question. Potty training has NOTHING to do with diapers, cloth or disposable. Potty training is about your individual child's readiness and consistent parental guidance. I've seen so many different ...


3

In my experience, things that contribute to my children wetting the bed are primarily one of three things: Drinking more before/during bedtime Sleeping more soundly Barriers to getting up to go in the middle of the night (Plus of course forgetting to go right before bed.) How could cold affect these? When it's cold outside, it's also dry. That means ...


3

Your frustration and concern are evident, and it doesn't sound like the advice given by your family physician was very helpful. If they can't do better, time for another opinion. Your next move is to get a consult for a pediatrician who has some experience in managing chronic constipation. While voluntary stool holding might not sound like constipation, ...


3

Daycare usually have scheduled bathroom times and will encourage all children to try at those times. This could be why he is not having accidents at daycare. I would go back to taking him into the bathroom at regular intervals when he is home with you. He may simply be too involved in his play to be paying attention to his body until it is too late.


3

This is called a 'potty pause' and is extremely common. First of all, you need to rule out physical causes. Is she constipated? Could she have cystitis or a urinary tract infection? If it hurts her to poo or pee she will resist doing so until she can't keep it in any longer. (Constipation can cause pee accidents as well, as the backed-up poo in the rectum ...


3

My daughter seems to like shoving her hand down her diapers. She is a scratch fan so she just tears up her skin unless we block her with a onesie. They make them for larger kids too: www.special-need-products.com They look like normal shirts so he shouldn't appear strangely to anyone. Just that when he does decide to give the toilet a try he will need extra ...


2

Use your gamma-ray vision goggles and check their bladder fill level. If somebody lifted the set that came in your parenting handbook (quite common considering their value on the black market) you're just going to have to wing it. Use your intuition. You probably know your child's mannerisms better than they do, so use your best judgment. But also expect to ...


2

First, don't punish him! I highly doubt he is intentionally deciding not to use the restrooms because he just feels like being naughty, these are accidents that he is unable to avoid. I'm sure the embarrassment of them is more then enough punishment to make him want to stop them, further punishment will not help. Worse, punishing him for accidents he ...


2

We have a child who is mildly Asperger's, and our story mirrors yours in many ways. He was six before he was dry through the night. We tried many things over a few years, but victory came with a concerted effort, following a plan from a physiotherapist who specialises in this. The plan is: use a bed wetting alarm (ours is similar to this). The child ...


2

The childcare has a responsibility to treat your child appropriately and according to your wishes. That said, there may be practical reasons why they need to put him in nappies (hygiene and having to wash the carpets). I've had exactly the same experience with my daughter. Every 30 minutes seems far too often, and could easily be off-putting to a small ...


2

Does he only do this when you are there to witness it, or does he do it at daycare and at home when you are out of the room too? I'm asking because it could be attention getting behaviour. Naturally, when he begins this inappropriate peeing, you react. You could try simply not reacting at all, walking away when he begins, then later coming back in to clean ...


2

Let her wet herself a few times. Take lots of spare panties and trousers with you, and a bag for putting wet ones in. It takes a while, and she'll understand that when she wets herself it's no fun for anyone, and will gradually learn to control it and tell you when she needs to go to the toilet. Fair warning from my experience, for the first couple of ...


2

I have always just waited til they are 3 yrs old. I have 4 kids, & that seems to work MUCH better than trying to train a 2-yr old. Cognitively, I just think they're better equipped. And mine are extremely smart (so it's not that they can't), their brains are just more well-developed by then. They understand more not only about their bodies (& its ...


2

Things that can help: Always take them to the potty at the same part of the routine. For us it's Potty->Brush Teeth->Read->Bed Don't get angry or raise your voice, calmly take them in and have them sit on the potty. Don't worry about them going, just get them in the habit of doing it. Praise them when they go, and give them a sticker. My son announces that ...


1

My daughter is 2 years and 4 months and completely dry even at night. Couple of things we did Lots of praise when she uses the potty. Ensure she's comfortable whenever she's going to the potty. We found this really really important. For example we sometimes left the room, talk to her about other things or got her a small book. Don't dwell on the ...


1

Note: I am not a psychologist. But, this sounds fear motivated. Maybe at some point in the past he had a painful constipation / stool. Maybe sitting over the yawning void of a toilet scares him. Maybe cold water splashed him once and that startled him. Who knows. But the best way to overcome fear is practice. As stated in user1751825's excellent breakdown, ...


1

How frustrating! I have 4 children and potty training was a challenge for all of them. I think you need to put away the potty chair, bring back the diapers and say nothing about potties for at least two months. Otherwise, you could be battling this issue for a real long time. She has got her back up about this, and the whole thing is going to become a power ...


1

He's not bothered, because he has no concept that wearing nappies is not a normal thing. He has been doing it all his life. A couple of things you could try. Avoid giving him drinks just before bed. Try instead to encourage him to drink more water earlier in the afternoon. Get him up to go to the toilet an hour or so after he goes to sleep. This is a bit ...


1

Kids develop at a wide range of rates. Your son may not have the bladder capacity to go an entire night without peeing. I also wouldn't assume he is waking up to pee. I have 4 kids and some took longer than others to wake up dry consistently. Especially if you allow him to have fruit juices or anything with sugar later in the day. They can contribute to ...


1

Odds are it's as Dariusz says, just delaying bedtime. But, do consider the possibility that he's constipated, also. Our two year old (who's completely potty trained now) has this happen periodically, where he says he needs to poop, then tries, can't, then does it again twenty minutes later. Typically it's because he's a bit constipated (as he tends to ...


1

I think any potty would be safe, as long as you supervise and support your child when on the potty.


1

One thing my wife and I did when we were at this stage was to set an alarm (on a phone or otherwise) that goes off every hour or so as a cue to go try. It worked pretty well for us, but of course not all children are the same.


1

I've raised three children of my own, and for many years worked in a daycare center. The truth is, that children often behave differently at daycare than at home. There is so much going on at daycare, with all the children and toys, that it's no wonder a child doesn't want to stop to go to the potty every 30 minutes. Daycare do have regularly scheduled ...


1

We used an variety of techniques, but I know many people have had success with other techniques. The most important is to be patient, recognize if your child is developmentally and/or physically ready to recognize body cues. My tips: have a plan and discuss with all caretakers so your son will have consistent help and support. no yelling/shaming for ...



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