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10

Three ideas (one you might not like, but if it works...): Make sure he goes to the bathroom just before bed. Did wonders for our daughter. Try some higher-absorbency pullups. Since he's almost 6, maybe move to GoodNights or something similar for older kids with bladder control issues. You might just be overloading the capacity of the diaper. If you can ...


9

Since toddlers (and babies) have been (and still are in various other cultures) potty trained this young and younger, apparently without a problem, The missing word here is some - some toddlers have been potty trained this young. Every child is different. Potty training combines two completely different developmental aspects: Physiological - ...


8

That sounds perfectly normal! You might wait a few months before trying again, giving your daughter time to adjust to all the change she is experiencing. Give her time to grow into her role as big sister before you start toilet training again. When you start again, don't try to do toilet training and binky separation at the same time. A binky, like ...


8

I would suggest you make a routine with your child to go to toilet more often, even if he/she says it's not needed. Often just sitting there makes it happen and creates a nice feeling of relief. This way the whole subject will receive less importance which is often the source of the problem taking so long time to disappear.


5

I agree with this other answer here and that's exactly what we are doing with our own daugther and this is obviously helping As for the original question: How to tell if a 4 year-old child deliberately postpones urinating until the last possible moment From long time of observing our daughter, she has the same behavior as adults who hold their ...


5

I personally think that having a three year-old clean up his own feces would not be a good idea; too much opportunity to make a mess or create an association that the potty is negative. I have a great deal of luck following the Incredible Years theories when potty training my two boys. I participated in several parent groups through Head Start. What I ...


5

First: In times of frustration about your child, always remember the parental mantra: It's just a phase. It will pass. (And be replaced by the next "phase"...) :) Don't despair, don't become impatient. You still have more than 80% of the time necessary for raising this child ahead of you. In a few years you will look back at the current phase and ...


4

As the parent to a withholder (from 6 months to 2.5 years!) you have my sympathy, but I must stress to you that it's vital that you completely back off the pressure right now. She absolutely has to be 100% comfortable pooing first and foremost - and as inconvenient as it is if that is in her pants, THAT is where she needs to poo. Holding poo in can cause ...


4

Generally speaking, I believe intrinsic motivation is always stronger and more lasting than extrinsic, and entails fewer risks (e.g. feeling entitled to rewards for routine tasks). Extrinsic vs. intrinsic motivation is touched upon in Why should children be rewarded for good behaviour? and How do I deal with a child that refuses to do a chore or task? ...


4

DISCLAIMER: I don't care if this gets down voted to the basement in hell, if it helps one other person, hopefully the OP, then I'm satisfied. This is advice I never thought anyone on this planet would ever be unlucky enough to need, honestly. Moderators feel free to delete it if you feel so inclined. My son had this same problem. In fact, just tonight, he ...


4

She's not quite ready. Keep her in a nappy for the next few months. Do keep the potty around and encourage her to sit on it, and get used to it, but keep the nappies on for now. My toddler was the same. We were convinced that by some trick we'd make her understand the peeing thing. She didn't... then one day she just got it. I don't think it was anything we ...


3

I think you should wait a bit. Ideally, your child should come to see you right after soiling his diaper to get it changed. We tried very hard to potty-train my second daughter, but it only worked when she would come see us to get a diaper when she was naked and needed to pee. Before that moment, she wasn't ready. That was at about 30 months old, by the ...


3

My 3rd child was really stubborn, I ended up getting a large shoe box and filling it with dollar store toys as a reward treasure box. It did work eventually! All kids are different as far as their response to rewards. if your child suffers from anxiety, then rewards can be a trigger for anxiety.


3

I'd like to begin by welcoming you to the community and reassuring you that, yes, this is normal. Many people are under the assumption that potty-training is something you do once and then it is done, but with most kids it doesn't really work that way. They have to learn the basics about how to use the potty. Then they have to learn their body signals, ...


3

I read the book, however, my kido took almost a fortnight to get used to it. "HOW TO" books do not consider the individual personality types.


3

I think every child is different and every home is different. Having a method to follow as a guide is good, but ultimately you need to adjust the method based on your child and your own busy life style. When I potty trained my daughter (who is now 3 and has been potty trained since ~2.5) I too read these "methods" online that promise you can train your kid ...


2

Put Cheerios on the back of the toilet. When my son had to pee he would throw a handful in the toilet and pee on them


2

My boy was much like that. But NEVER move back steps as that is basically telling him it's okay to give up. As the "wait" can be a bit boring, give him a book or have a poster up in the toilet for him to stare at while he does his biz. Even a really cool printed toilet paper. Provide a reward. Not sure if you condone Chocolate, but if you don't then use cars ...


2

My younger son struggled with night-time wetting until he was 14. In his younger years, we weren't too worried about it; I had several friends who assured me he would grow out of it. He was a VERY heavy sleeper, and even if I went in to wake him for a bathroom break in the middle of the night, he didn't really wake up. I actually stopped doing that after I ...


2

To @Valkyrie's excellent suggestions, I would add that mastering toileting is your child's "job," and at this age you might consider making him part of the clean-up process. If the sheets are wet in the morning, he has to help pull them, he helps wash them, he helps put them back on the bed. By making him responsible for these daytime activities, he may ...


2

I did the same with my boy once. We have a Mickey Mouse phone with a demo button and it starts moving and making sounds. I was holding my boy and made a jerking movement, to surprise him or so with a mind set of "oh geez, what is this all the sudden"... What was I thinking, so stupid... I instantly made him afraid. And it didn't go away by just putting the ...


2

From my understanding (also in progress!), the point of the extrinsic motivations, whatever they are, is to help get past the initial difficulties - for a chemist, think "activation energy". You want getting on the potty to be a comfortable, familiar experience, with positive associations. So you provide an M&M or a sticker. That allows the child to ...


2

The initial goal should be simply using the potty. This creates a strong positive connection to the desired behavior, that is easy for the child to comprehend. I'd also recommend the reward be some sort of short, focused time with the parent - can be a game of patty cake, reading them a very short book. It's both relatively "free" and they can never eat too ...


2

I got lucky when it came to potty training. All I had to do was ask her and she did it. Wow! Other tasks weren't so easy, though. I don't recall what it was I was try to teach her, but this is what I did and what I hope will help you by my sharing it. First, I would recommend not calling it "an accident". The reason being is that we all naturally want ...


2

The only answer you can really get is "as long as it takes". Every child is different. I know boys who trained in a weekend, and boys who took months or even years. Some of the difference has to do with whether you wait until the child is completely ready (physically and mentally). 17 months is early-ish, though certainly some children to train that ...


2

Twenty months is quite young to expect a child to be potty trained. It will happen when he's physiologically and developmentally ready, and there's not a lot you can do to move it forward, and good reasons not to try: frustration and icky messes on your part, tears and shame on his part, and a lot of conflict between you two to no purpose. If it isn't ...


2

I don't have any real 'evidence' for this, but my nephew used to do the same thing. When he was being potty trained, he would go hide in a corner and poop his pants instead of in the toilet, which baffled us completely. He used to hide when wearing a diaper too. One day though, he walked in on his grandma in the bathroom and asked what she was doing, so she ...


2

It may not be the answer you want and it will probably get down voted but the best thing you can do is to move back in together and try a lot harder to make your marriage work.


2

Here's my attempt: You messed up your relationship (I'm not criticizing it, BTW, I'm just stating a fact) and that obviously troubles your daughter. If you feel like you cannot fix your relationship, all you can do is to try to minimize the negative effects this has on your daughter. If I was in your place, I'd start out by asking myself why she behaves ...


1

I'm not a parent but I know people that got their kids to stop using binkys. Let them use them, but each week cut a little snip off the tip. After two or so months there won't be any left. Most likely they'll not want it any more though before it even gets to that point. You just gotta make sure they don't find any full ones or it ruins it



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