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14

I've found that children generally are deferential to adults who aren't their relatives or friends. So be friendly and don't be scared to engage with them. I've found if children are hogging stuff, if you say: "Hey there can my kid have a go on this, it looks cool?" will usually result in them moving along to something else, or showing you and your kid how ...


13

Don't get into the habit of comparing yourself to others, you'll always find someone who is better at some aspect of parenting that you are, and comparing yourself to them will just make you feel bad about yourself. That isn't to say you shouldn't observe what other parents do and emulate what you think is good (and avoid what isn't), it's a good way to ...


13

When you play with him at home, say to him, I can play with you for 10 minutes, but then I have to run to put dinner in the oven and will be right back. At the end of 10 minutes, say I am going to put dinner in the oven and then I will be right back, how about you make superman fly over the tower of blocks (or whatever you are playing) while I am gone and ...


10

When mine were younger, I would give them some of the following: their own fork, shovel and bucket and a piece of soil they could dig in similarly, a toy mower (and a toy vacuum cleaner, which bizarrely was more popular in the garden) a bucket and a hose (turned on, but not too much :-) outdoor bowls and a series of targets play tents a sand pit Duplo lego ...


9

At that age, it is normal to spend pretty much all her waking time trying to interact with her - remember, the more interaction she has with you, your wife and others now, the faster her brain will develop, and the easier it is for her to learn social skills. That said, be sensible about it - you don't both need to be with her, so take turns - each of you ...


9

My son is the same, as was I. It's pretty normal. So normal that when I showed up to daycare with my mouth duct taped shut (because Spider-man doesn't have a mouth), the social workers understood. The teachers still had to call them in- probably some kind of policy regarding duct tape on children's mouths- but it was more hilarious than anything else, ...


9

If you don't feel comfortable interfering here, either because you think you're going to rage out or because you don't see any possible positive outcome, then avoid the place altogether. Instead, I would find similar places that have more supervision, or if wherever you live has limited children's activities, go with a bunch of friends who have kids about ...


8

Okay, a few pieces of advice. Can your son help you with the baby in any way? If you are bottle feeding can he help with that? If you are nursing can he bring you anything? Can he sing to the baby while you feed him/her? Can he play with a doll right next to you while you are helping the baby? Can he be in charge of poopy diaper disposal (my kids took ...


8

A baby's screaming to get your attention is not going to hurt her at all. What she is doing is training you with the behaviour she wants: she screams -> you play with her What you can do is talk to her. At this point it doesn't matter that she can't understand everything you say, but giving a response along the lines of: Just a moment - I'll ...


8

Sounds like he's a social kid with a lot of energy. How often does he go out to see other kids? How often does he get outside? My almost-three year old does play with toys, but he's honestly happier 'bouncing around' or outdoors. Kids are unique, and some tend more towards imaginative play with toys, while some tend towards social play. Overall, it ...


7

This role playing is normal, common, and essential for skills building. In imaginative role play children get to practice dialog, politeness, meanness, being the authority (parent), and all sort of other social interactions they have been exposed to. They also will seek out and gain knowledge on the subject of their role play to enable it to be more fun and ...


7

A child of six months really does need a lot of attention. Too little would be of far more concern than any possible damage she could do to herself through screamig (not likely, as established by others already). Giving a child of this age enough attention while still having some: time for yourself, Time to get regular household chores done Time for ...


6

I don't know how into books your oldest one is, but it might be time to start a new book or book series ;-) if he/she is into that sort of thing. Also...if your kids are at all prone to motion sickness, make sure you take some dramamine or something to help with that. As an added benefit, dramamine makes most people drowsy. I'm not advocating drugging ...


5

I have flown frequently with my children, now 7 and 4. We have traveled a lot-and on long flights-like to Europe or to Hawaii from the midwest. I do not like electronics for them, I prefer other things-I let them play/watch for 30 minutes per 4 or 5 hours of flight or per flight. However, if they get really fussy, I might allow an extra 30 minutes or ...


5

Though I always start with non-electronic activities, I make sure to keep a few tucked into my bag as a backup. There is nothing more miserable than realizing they've run through everything you packed them, and that there are three hours left in this stupid flight. Also, don't forget, you could have your flight delayed, and that one hour space before the ...


5

I would say that snacks are a must. I would also definitely recommend gum (for the older one) and a sippy cup for the younger ones to help their ears adjust during takeoff and landing. If they have any favorite animals or blankets, those might be obvious choices. I would also let them help with the packing. Give them a small bag (or whatever amount of ...


5

This all depends on where you live. If you live in some countries, where they adore their kids, then this would be considered par for the course. I remember walking down a street with our (then) three year old daughter in one such country. A waitress came out of a cafe, picked her up, and carried her into the shop. 30 seconds later they re-emerged, our ...


4

The signs would be that the child is not happy with the number of activities or is not doing as well as they should do due to lack of time or energy. In the end, the child should be able to do as many activities as they want subject to: the child wanting to do them the parents being willing to pay for them the parents willing to drive them around it not ...


4

Their own corner of the garden to dig in Paintbrushes and a bucket of water to "Paint" the sidewalk An empty bucket and a pile of rocks I have a yard ornament that looks like a frog with a hole in the mouth, my boys are 2 and love to "feed" the froggy every time we go outside.


4

Maybe don't push it, they might start to resent each other. They'll surely end up doing something together, which you can note and encourage. With age they will surely start to enjoy each other more. I remember family games of monopoly with my younger sister by 21 months. Not sure what the 14month can play... rock, paper scissors? At this point you ...


3

The behavioralist axiom is to reward the behavior you want and punish the behavior you don't. A tantrum should bring swift, certain, severe punishment. So applied here ... when the child spends time playing alone, praise and reward him. When he acts out, punish him, perhaps by closing him in his room or taking away prized possessions for a time. There ...


3

It is very hard to deal with undisciplined children, especially when they have disciplining parents. A few suggestions: Speak to the parent privately and give suggestions. Demonstrate good parenting at all times. Teach your child to remove themselves from the situation. Teach your child, and this is a big one in our family, that different children have ...


3

It can indeed feel very lonely watching someone else play with your kids in a way that clearly makes them happy while you are just sitting on the sidelines ignored. Do not misinterpret this. If you are more the peaceful type (like me), just wait quietly in the sidelines. Some day soon you will see one of yours step out of the bundle of playing kids, walk ...


3

When you were a child, what kind of games or toys did you like to play? Maybe playing those games or with those toys with children will allow you to be more comfortable and get into it. The more practice you do the better you will be at it. I spend what feels like a LOT of time sitting with my 2 year old just watching him play, giving him some encouragement ...


3

I don't think there's a clear answer to your question, I think there would be several theories but nobody knows for sure. Children's brains are less developed, and some of humor is definitely learned, however the raw sense of humor that comes genetically is still there. She may be picking up her cue from you, realizing you are doing something funny because ...


3

No, a toddler doesn't understand irony. You're right about the levels: The irony is what makes it fun for you, but it's simply the action that makes it fun for her. You're playing with her, you're playing with a doll, you're making lots of noise. To verify this, try this next time: Don't change your behavior but do change the topic (the reason for the ...


3

One thing I've always done is talk to my kids like they're just another person. I don't talk cute or baby, I talk words and I have appropriate expectation that they can deal with what I say. This is a situation that is not only about who's runnin the joint -- @RoryAlsop's point -- but also about general interaction with a baby. "What are you crazy? You ...


3

It doesn't seem that peculiar to me. My friend's 5 year old daughter loves "reading" from adult books (i.e. turning the pages while telling stories about princesses and mermaids). It's fun to make up stories, and "reading" them just gives the imaginative play some context. Can't that be it?


2

Don't have a huge amount to add to the other good advice. I can't remember where I read it (a blog somewhere) but something struck a chord with me that I always think about during play - you have to learn to be child-like with children. Get down on their level. Pretend. Be silly. Joke with them. Sing daft songs. Casting aside your adopted adult inhibitions ...


2

Playful Parenting is a book with lots of good ideas. It not only provides different techniques but also helps in understanding why play is important and helps in building connection with the kids. I have been following the tips and have had great success in building connection with my kids. You could also look at this book The Art of Roughhousing which ...



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