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34

I take what I consider to be a pragmatic approach: if there is no toy which is obviously a gun, kids just make their own (60-80% of boys, 30% of girls, play with "aggressive toys" of some variety). Fingers, sticks, coat hangers (which double as pretty decent fighter planes and space ships, IMHO), pencils/pens, cardboard tubes (packing tubes make great ...


12

Most important then if you should let your child play with toy A or toy B, is what you already posted in your question: What are the effects this kind of play have in the children's psichology? Remember toddlers and young children have trouble separating fantasy from reality. His nightmares and fantasies will seem as real as school to them. You have to ...


8

I've decided to share a few things we do right now which seem to be interesting and fun and (I think) help her develop (or at least don't slow her development:). Just an explaination: I write her all the time because I have a daughter. At this age it doesn't change much for boys I guess. Indoors Activities with children's books There are many books for ...


5

Consider you answered your own question, you turned out okay, rationally recognizing the inherent dangers. There are important, legitimate, appropriate, responsible uses of weapons for defense, hunting to provide food, and sports. Its not just about violence, or playing cops & robbers. Water, essential for life, is inherently dangerous. A child can ...


3

Whatever she wants to do. Seriously - get her outside, and ask her. She can do whatever she wants, so long as it's outside. (And if she wants you to play with her, you should make the time - she'll only be eight once, after all!) And that means leaving the schedule a bit open-ended. Maybe she'll doodle with chalk on the sidewalk. Maybe she'll run around ...


3

To be honest, it sounds like the concern should be that there is very little time in the routine to play. Play is essential for children - both physical (running, jumping, dancing, etc) and mental play (board games, computer games, I-Spy etc) so if your difficulty is in fitting that into her routine I would suggest trying to change the routine or all too ...


3

Whenever you hold a human being by an appendage or 2 and then whirl them around, you create substantial force on their body, proportional to the rotational velocity at which you are spinning them. While this can be done at various ages, declaring it as "safe" is a non-starter. Any number of odd events could happen causing you to lose sufficient focus on ...


3

This is perfectly normal behaviour for most children. Cuddly toys feel nice - which is why there is a large industry in making things such as Taggies specifically for kids to rub on their face or put in their mouth. I have one child who absolutely loves rubbing her face against a sheepskin rug. This sort of behaviour even remains into adulthood for some ...


3

When they can grasp them is the short answer. There are various stages of play but as a first starting point as soon as they have the coordination to pick them up one by one to begin exploring colour, shape texture and (of course) taste! Creating structures requires the ability to do imaginative play and is a considerably later developmental stage so I ...


3

My suggestion for 1 year old play is to take them outside. Bring them to a park or outside environment every day, in all weather. Let them get dirty, hot and cold, muddy and dusty. This will stimulate their entire body which will stimulate their mind. Outside play also stimulates their immune system letting them encounter bacteria that are abundant and ...


2

I agree with taking children outside, they learn so much by exploring nature and the surrounding environment. As a parent of teenagers, we did so many early activities related to reading - one thing I wished I'd done more is playing games to develop early MATH skills. Here are some ideas: One type of toy that seems really simple but are important ...


1

The answer to this depends in part on your locality. In the US, some states have no minimum age for it to be legal to allow your minor to be unsupervised, while others do, as old as 12 in the case of my home state (Illinois). Now, that's not necessarily an enforced law, and undoubtedly is meant primarily to apply to fully unsupervised minors (ie, parents ...


1

It really depends on exposure and interest. I buy a lot of building toys because I feel they are really great for imaginative play. I did not start with wooden blocks because I wasn't sure if she would be chucking it at me. We have wooden blocks (passed down from my husband's grandmother who was really into architecture) but I think they must be for adults, ...


1

One interesting approach is the one championed by Teacher Tom (teachertomsblog.blogspot.com). Basically, make informative statements about your child's actions and their effects on the world ("You're hurting me." or "You said thank you to the lady at the store, and, see, it made her smile.", "I can't let you do this, it's dangerous") and model the behavior ...


1

Well, first of all i don't think its we that need to flip a switch, play-time is just as important in parenting as feeding your child, its food for their soul. But to answer the question: how do you flip the switch between playmate to parent to educate them that what they did was wrong but then be able to transition back to playmate? You don't. Its ...


1

I don't think I'd recommend doing this at all. I've seen that move go awry before and all the screaming and bruising kind of turned me off to ever trying it. Might I recommend an alternative? At around 1 years old you can try this and they will have just as much fun. Instead of by the arm and leg, you just grab the child underneath the armpits firmly and ...



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