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0

I was reading some of the (much) earlier posts and something someone said about social anxiety struck a chord with me. This really reminds me of my situation years ago - before I had a clue what social anxiety was and how it affected my life. Social Anxiety (for me, at least) is an error in the triggering of fight-or-flight response. Normally this kicks in ...


-1

My personal experience with my soon to be 20 year old son: I was fed up with him not enrolling in school or work. I gave him the choice of get a job and contribute or get out. I've taken video games, computer, phones away forever and it still did not work. He is a very social person. That is why I don't blame his unemployment on lack of confidence. He is a ...


3

I suggest not to tell them that you smoke. Instead, When you decide to quit smoking tell everyone around you including your parents that you are going to give up smoking on so and so date. That will put some positive pressure on you to in giving up the habit and it will also make them happy that have made a healthy decision and will support you in every way ...


6

Is there a nice way to tell them? I'm not quite sure I know what you mean by "a nice way". If you mean, a way that they won't be upset or won't cause a scene, you might try taking them out to dinner at a very nice restaurant and breaking the news to them there after a couple glasses of fine wine. That will probably force them to keep their voices down. ...


3

Being protective like this is completely normal. With my first child, I tried not to let anything happen to him and ran to him for every cry. I wanted nothing but the best for my baby. I now have three boys and my wife is pregnant again. The boys are always hurting themselves by falling down, running into things, fighting with each other. Children, and ...


4

This is the most beautiful feeling you will ever feel. All good and normal parents do feel protective. Just know that you have to balance this with your child's needs. It is alright to feel protective, but it will be wrong to keep him locked up. Let him explore in a good way. Know that feeling protective over your child will only add to your and his ...


0

I think the distinction between pessimism and skepticism lies in intent. Skepticism is a tool we use to learn more. Pessimism is a hang-up some of us have that we use to "protect our biases" (almost the opposite of healthy skepticism). I think the way you encourage children to be healthy skeptics instead of pessimists is a little counter-intuitive for ...


2

I'll address what other answers didn't seem to yet. I don't even feel comfortable sharing any feelings with 'B' because of how they have neglected me in the past. Not sure if you mean that you just don't want B to know how you feel; OR that you don't mind if they know but you don't want to go through the process of telling them? If it's the former, ...


2

Some people have really awful experiences of their parents, ranging from criminal levels of abuse through to mild misunderstanding, but most people just don't understand that. In this situation you've clearly said that you have no wish to get back in contact with your father. That will be hard for him to hear and to live with, but that's a problem for him ...


4

Honest, but not secretive. If your child asks for your opinion, give it. And also give the context, and what other people think. Giving an amount of information that indicates you expect your child to take your word as opinion rather than gospel will do far more to develop critical thinking skills than handing books and sermons on the type of sceptical ...


0

I am very much a skeptic - in the true 'scientific method' meaning. Skeptical of everything. I am also, apparently, the most optimistic and positive person in my group of friends and acquaintances. To me the world is generally a good place, and the majority of people are good to each other, themselves and the environment. I feel a large number of people who ...


2

Two parts to your question. First, you are concerned about passing the pessimism and negative side of your personality. On that, I would say that passing on our personality to our kids is inevitable. At least some of it will rub off. I cringe when I see some of my bad habits and character traits in my kids. But it can be minimized, and for that there ...


2

This is a valid concern, and it's admirable that you're honest enough to admit that the degree with which you feel negatively about things is not necessarily the best outlook. As you've noted, critical thinking is different from pessimism/cynicism. If you want to keep the latter out of your child's thinking, you'll need to keep your judgements to yourself. ...


10

You are not required to have a relationship with anyone you don't want to. Full stop. You've made it through some rough times by working hard; you're allowed to feel what you feel towards this person, and act in whatever way is best for your mental and emotional health. If you wish, you can tell B that you do not wish to have contact now via ...



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