New answers tagged

1

I would address this the same way I would address this with a child (even though it's the reverse here). Sit down, have a conversation, where you discuss with them your feelings, why you want what you want, ask them why they do what they do, and then see if you can find a middle ground. After all, your solution (salt less in the cooked food then individual ...


4

You've tried already to ask and your parents have said that they are willing to accommodate you, but they continue to salt according to their taste. I have two suggestions. Be specific about the amount of salt. So instead of "can you use less salt?", try something more like "can you use half the amount of salt that the recipe calls for?" Because maybe they ...


3

You're asking your parents to do something quite easy in theory, yet very difficult in practice: To cook the food in a way that tastes wrong to them. As you've discovered, salt and the enhanced flavors it gives are habit-forming. To your parents, "unsalted" food tastes bland and bad, simply because it doesn't meet their expectations of the flavors. When ...


7

You answer your own question in the prohibitions you put on the acceptable answers. If someone is doing something that you don't like there are only a few solution. Ask them to stop Do it yourself (cook for yourself or move out) Accept it There aren't really any other choices. What you need to do is work on #1 more. The only way to resolve an issue it ...


3

I have been on the other side of this fence. I am a parent whose 'child' changed their major. There are some very good answers here; I'll add what I can. First, this is recent and a shock. Give it some time; your parents are possibly grieving the loss of the future they envisioned for you (and themselves; futures tend to be intertwined in the mind), ...


0

I would like to have a slightly different focus than the other answers. This will have a similar outcome as other answers (Talk to them in a neutral way. DO NOT start yelling), but I want to emphasize that YOU need to figure out what you want to do, because you have to live your life. Not them. If you end up not liking engineering, you have deal with hating ...


2

I've been on your side of the fence, in a similar situation and, looking back, I'm extremely grateful for how things turned out. When I entered college, what I really wanted to be was a camp counselor, working with kids in a less formal setting. My grandmother, who funded my education (after my father flatly refused, saying "there's no point in throwing ...


10

MakorDal has already given some good advice. I'd also add: when you are able to talk to your parents again, start by emphasising the things you agree on. You both want you to be a happy, healthy prosperous adult. You agree a good education is key to making this happen. You agree that it is very good of your parents to fund your education, and that you ...


-3

Your parents are buying you a very expensive education (relative to other avenues). Ignoring the significant possibility that they worked really hard to earn that money, remember it's theirs. They could have bought a yaght, a beach house, put a really nice edition on the house, took a romantic trip to New Zealand to rekindle their romance. But instead they ...


7

We know a bit about your situation, we weren't there for your ill fated phone call, so I'll give you barely an answer. First : Do you have someone in your family that can act as an intermediary, like a sibling, aunt/uncle or a grand parent ? Second : About your major, if your parents are both engineers, I'd advise you to prepare what you want to say to ...


-1

I think it's great that you are able to connect with your cousin on this level. It's really important for kids to have someone they can look up to and interact with on an "adult" level, but who may not have all the "baggage" that comes with being a parent. Proud parents often can't help trying to showcase their kids and parents also forget that kids ...


1

My background: I can only speak for myself as I've witnessed described behaviour several times but never spoke up and ask why they do so. My daughter is 3 years old, it's about 6 months that she speaks more than one word. Current situation: When I talk to her most of the times I do it like I would with anyone else. But there are times when I'm not sure if ...



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