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0

Yes, give it back. It's a fun game in which your baby learns about the world.


1

In the case below, "it," is an action or behavior that is undesired/wrong. Blackmailing is: The person who did "it" knows they did something wrong. You know the person did "it," and that "it" is wrong. The person who did "it" knows that you know. Blackmailing--> You coerce behavior from the person who did "it" by threatening to expose the the person for ...


4

My principle is to try to stick to "natural consequences". That is, I do not punish my children in a way that makes me seem to be peeved, and therefore I punish them. Rather than that, I focus on why I want to correct my children's behavior, and try to let them feel what the consequences are if they behave incorrect. Mostly that's just not shielding the ...


4

I think that what your sister is getting at is the distinction between several kinds of discipline. Let's say that I want my child (let's call him Tommy) to eat a healthy dinner. How can I do that? "Tommy, if you eat (all of) your spinach, I'll let you have a cookie." "Tommy, if you don't eat your spinach, you can't have a cookie." These are inverses ...


2

The only really bad thing would be to threaten a punishment that you don't intend to carry through on or that is disproportionate to the offense. Punishment is not blackmail. The law does not blackmail us in to not stealing from other people. It tells us that if we do bad thing x, bad thing y will happen to us. This is a natural and important part of ...


13

The thing is, it sounds like blackmailing, but you are teaching that actions have consequences. "If you don't go to bed now you will be tired tomorrow" is a fact; however one that children won't get. Tomorrow is ages away and child cares mostly about now. But you actually know more about the child than it does when it is small, so you need to be able to ...


-4

Beauty of God: every problem has at least one solution, or maybe more than one. First you observe, research, and find the habits of your brother, then work on those habits and try to build good relation-ship with him. At the same time, design a complete plan in black and white. Also, read human psychology because 90% of behaviors are similar for all ...


1

As a 46 year old woman who has to deal with parents whose political views differ quite radically from my own, I agree whole heartedly with the answer above, which recommends you help your daughter discern between facts and views as she gets older, so that that she can more objectively assess any issues that come up. I wouldn't ever underestimate the ...


4

First of all, these sorts of things are rarely caused by one event. Rather, that one event is usually the "straw that broke the camel's back" after a long series of problems in a relationship. If I had to guess, I would say your brother's "stuff" that happened was at least partially motivated by trying to elicit a certain kind of attention from your mom. ...


1

As always with complications between parents and children (or any humans, actually), to me the most important questions seem to all start with: Why? Why did this seemingly minor thing make your brother move out? (If it is as you say, it probably wasn't the cause, but just the trigger. So what's the cause?) Why weren't your parents able to mend this? (Of ...


4

Is this just simply an inappropriate request from my wife's brother? Of course not. Your in-laws need to think of the welfare of their children. They have a right to ask, and you have a right to refuse. Financially, it is the responsibility of the parents to provide enough life insurance that if they were to die, a new, bigger house and major expenses ...


8

Put yourselves in their shoes for a minute. They chose you for a reason. Try to think of what it is. Likely the biggest factor is they like what kind of parents you are, and they think you are the most capable financially. We have one or two children with special needs, depending how you define it (one with severe cerebral palsy, one with ADHD). There ...


2

My question is, is this damaging/unproductive in raising a kid? "Damaging" and "Unproductive" are subjective. We need to think in terms of conditioning. If the mother wants to condition the child into thinking that "she-who-shouts-loudest-gets-their-way", then this mother is succeeding. This child will continue to believe this is normal conflict ...


13

I know a lot of parents who sort of "out-ridiculous" their kid to remind them what a tantrum looks like to others and how unlikely it is to result in getting what they want. In those cases, the parent isn't trying to assert dominance, and I personally don't think it's particularly harmful, but you know if that's what the parent is doing because it usually ...


1

Sharing a Bathroom In a two bedroom one bathroom apartment, you will have to share your bathtub and toilet with the kids. This may mean having to clean up bath toys diligently daily so you can shower. This may mean having to wipe down the toilet seat every single time you need to use it because a kids potty ring leaks on the seat. Child flushes a toy down ...


3

Something to consider in either situation-house or apartment-is lead. Lead can be found in paint, pipes, and bathroom fixtures (like the tub, for instance). If you live in a newer apartment complex, or purchase a new home, this is not an issue. If you currently reside in an apartment, and lead is present (there are lead test kits available in most ...


7

What are the major challenges that we should consider before we try to raise 2 children in our apartment? My wife and I had our 1st child while living in a 750sq. ft. 2 bedroom apartment and our 2nd child while living in a rather large 3 bedroom house. We immediately adapted to both. If you love your kids, you'll find a way to make it work in a 500sq. ...



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