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9

That sounds perfectly normal! You might wait a few months before trying again, giving your daughter time to adjust to all the change she is experiencing. Give her time to grow into her role as big sister before you start toilet training again. When you start again, don't try to do toilet training and binky separation at the same time. A binky, like ...


5

You may not like to hear this, but how about not giving her a pacifier? I grew up without ever having one. My daughter is well beyond that age and never had one. My mother always told me (unverified) that they increase the chances you'll need braces. It doesn't harm her not to have one, so why worry?


2

Sterilization using solely water or steam would indeed take more than five minutes. Steam that is just at 100°C would take close to an hour and a half to completely sterilize the vessels - and a better process is to repeat it several times (Tyndallization, referenced in that article as well). However, you're not just using steam here; you're also washing ...


1

I'm not a parent but I know people that got their kids to stop using binkys. Let them use them, but each week cut a little snip off the tip. After two or so months there won't be any left. Most likely they'll not want it any more though before it even gets to that point. You just gotta make sure they don't find any full ones or it ruins it


1

All the sudden attention the new baby is getting is likely to perturb your 3-year-old, due either to jealousy of the new interloper, or fear of your loss of interest and attention, or a bit of both. It's quite normal for older siblings to regress somewhat when there are stressful changes in their immediate environment, partly because it feels easy and ...


1

I totally agree with not giving her one at all, we gave our son one and I wish we never did, if she does take it make sure you dont make the mistake we did and that was not taking it off him early, he is 4 now and still asks for it.


1

I agree with the suggestions that you don't use the pacifier at all. However, have you yet found the pacifiers with the little stuffed animal attached? It's there to add weight and stability to the pacifier and keeps it on the baby's chest. They look like a pacifier with a beanie baby sewed to the part that we grip. Good luck, and probably your little one is ...


1

My daughter did this too from a newborn. Every parent thinks their child is extremely intelligent but even our doctor told us she's very advanced, so my point is she was smart enough to know that if she dropped it. .. mom shows up! I would hold it in for her and if I moved my hand away a little she'd pop it out just enough to hit my hand to make sure I was ...


1

I realize this was posted a long time ago, but I figured I'd answer so that when other moms search the topic, this might help. This happens to me with my six week old. This is the conclusion I've drawn... The only real option, I'm realizing, is to gently hold it in her mouth (almost just catching it as it begins to fall from her mouth) until she's in a deep ...


1

We roll a soft blanket and lay it along side of her. She sleeps with her head turned sideways so this allows the soother to stay propped but if she needs to push it out of her mouth she still can. Doesn't always work but buys us time. Hate constantly getting up to put it back in! She is 2 months old.


1

It is possible that they don't want the pacifier. My daughter never did. We ended up using our pinky finger (pad side up, nail down) when she was fussy.


1

Well I created a strap for my baby's pacifier and it works great. It's loose enough that she can spit it out when she really doesn't want it while still being snug enough for her to use her little fist to pop it back in if it slips out a little by accident. I never use it at night though and I'm a very vigilant mommy anyway, so she is always in front of me ...



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