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19

Seems unsafe to even try anything like that. I recall our hospital had a whole bunch of things they said not to do with pacifiers that pretty much all revolved around the notion of "don't do like your grandmother did." (if you look at old pacifiers, you'll see they have 4 holes, two on each side... those were for tying ribbon behind the baby's head to keep ...


14

I remembered reading that recent pediatric research in the US has said that pacifiers are OK. I looked at some recent papers and found these: Pacifiers reduce the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). That's a pretty strong recommendation for nap-time use. Pacifiers probably don't interfere with breast-feeding. There's correlation between ...


11

You should never secure a pacifier to a child's mouth. Doing so could obstruct a child's breathing, prevent stomach contents from clearing the mouth or airway if refluxed or regurgitated, and decrease oral sensory awareness if the child's senses perceive the device as offensive. It is important that you consider why the pacifier is falling out. Questions ...


10

I believe you got a wrong advice regarding breastfeeding (As far as I know pediatricians get little to no training in breastfeeding so their advice regarding breastfeeding should be taken with a grain of salt). The most nourishing milk is hind milk which takes a while to get to. You certainly should not limit the baby's time on the breast and you should ...


10

Get them down to using a single pacifier, then cut a sliver off of the pacifier each day, making it shorter and shorter. I would recommend getting them off the pacifier before they are old enough to rationalize missing it; 8 - 13 months old maybe.


9

Safety is the most important criteria (though most pacifiers you can find for sale meet safety guidelines). Other than that, all pacifiers are equally good/bad for your child depending on how responsibly you use them. Let your baby choose his favorite! Safety Make sure the nipple cannot detatch from the pacifier The shield (the plastic part) should ...


8

This is typical infant behavior. Keep in mind infants typically don't know what their hands are doing, that they can control them, or that they are even part of their own body. (My 5 month old son still wakes himself in the night, by whacking himself in the face -- he thinks someone else is doing it! I have to tightly wrap him in a blanket, to jeep his ...


8

That sounds perfectly normal! You might wait a few months before trying again, giving your daughter time to adjust to all the change she is experiencing. Give her time to grow into her role as big sister before you start toilet training again. When you start again, don't try to do toilet training and binky separation at the same time. A binky, like ...


7

Here are two sites with the results of research on nipple confusion. The American Journal of Pediatrics concluded: "Breastfeeding duration in the first 3 months' postpartum was unaffected by pacifier use." The European Journal of Pediatrics reported the following conclusion, "In our study population fluid supplements offered by bottle with or without the ...


7

In my opinion, I'd have them self-pacifying before they go to school at the very latest. Since you don't know how long it will take to wean them off, it's probably better to give yourself a head start of 6 months - a year before the time you'd like them cut off. Start weaning them off by having it for exclusive use only: only for bedtime, only in the car, ...


7

Sucking his thumb at this age is appropriate. The next stage will be putting most things in his mouth. Encourage your little one to explore his world through his mouth. There are more receptors and development there than the rest of his body at this age. Give him lots of appropriate toys & teethers to chew on too, especially when he can hold them. Sounds ...


7

I don't believe there is any compelling reason to avoid pacifier use for infants, particularly after the first 4 weeks (although earlier might be okay, too; see below). Ultimately, the decision may be influenced by your child's preference. My son had absolutely no interest in pacifiers by the time he was about 2 months old. In truth, there actually is ...


7

One cause for concern is nipple confusion. Essentially: Baby tries to use the bottle-feeding technique on the breast and has difficulty latching-on and sucking. Baby gets very frustrated, and so does mother. Nipple confusion can even lead to baby refusing the breast. Here's an explanation. Not all children get it (mine didn't), but I've had friends ...


6

I think you'll just have to put it back in once he or she complains. It shouldn't be that hard since you're never far from a 2 mo. old anyway, right?


5

For some brands of pacifiers, you can find a stuffed animal which attaches to the pacifier. For example, for the Soothie pacifier, you can check out the Wannanub product line (see monkey version below), available on Amazon. Even young babies can learn that they can hang on to the toy and get access to the pacifier.


5

Do: I'd let her do it at least until she can deliberately grab other objects to suck on instead. The only thing you should check is that the skin of the hands don't get irritated from being moist all the time, and keep the nails short (though infant nails usually don't need to be clipped because they're so soft in the first place). If moist hand skin becomes ...


5

It may sound weird but another option is tape. A friend of mine had the same problem when she was about that age and at night before bed her mother would put duct tape over her thumb to keep her from sucking it. It took a while but eventually it worked. Just for clarity: Duct tape was used but it was put on in such a way that the child was able to ...


5

Far from preventing him, you should be encouraging him if possible. This is great way for babies to comfort themselves - now that your son has found his thumb, he shouldn't need dummies/pacifiers any more. He's getting self-sufficient :-)


5

I suspect that she is waking during the night because she is hungry. Babies have growth spurts at about 2, 3, and 6 weeks, then 3 and 6 months. A hungry baby will not sleep well. So I would suggest adding in a night time feed. Try it for a week and see if this gets her to sleep. We removed the pacifier from our baby at about this time and never went back. ...


5

You may not like to hear this, but how about not giving her a pacifier? I grew up without ever having one. My daughter is well beyond that age and never had one. My mother always told me (unverified) that they increase the chances you'll need braces. It doesn't harm her not to have one, so why worry?


4

Dummy / Pacifier use should stop between the ages of 6 months and 12 months ... http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Reducingtheriskofcotdeath.aspx It's possible that using a dummy at the start of any sleep period reduces the risk of cot death. However, the evidence is not strong and not all experts agree that dummies should be promoted. Don't ...


4

One thing that can help is to put a thin mitten on when she goes to bed. Since she only does this in her sleep, and it makes her thumb hurt, she'll understand that this helps her thumb not to hurt when she wakes up, and should accept the mitten. (Although be aware that she might be sucking her thumb during the day as well, just not when you see it. ...


4

I have three boys, with my youngest still using a pacifier. What worked for me was cutting a triangle-shaped notch out of the end of the pacifier and then giving it to my toddler son. If done correctly, the notched pacifier will look like a forked tongue. My son would immediately spit out the damaged pacifier with a confused look on his face. I'd say, ...


3

Could he be teething? In that case he might find the pacifier too soft, and he's looking for something with more chewable resistance. Try offering him teething toys (put them in the fridge first for added effect) and see if he likes them more than the pacifier. If he's not teething, it might be that he has discovered/decided that he dislikes that ...


3

We had similar problems. This pacifier worked for us:


3

For starters, introducing a pacifier is the wrong approach -- it's another dependence, just as bad for her teeth, and worse -- a choking habit in a child with strong enough bite to sever it! Try covering her thumb at night with an unpleasant-tasting but harmless substance such as hot sauce or lemon juice, or having her wear gloves/mittens to bed. It's just ...


3

Why do children suck pacifiers? Answering that question helps unravel the weaning puzzle. Infants are born with a sucking reflex and sucking is a natural and effective calming strategy. They are born with a NEED to suck. As their motor, vision, and attending skills develop, healthy children should be encouraged to learn more age appropriate calming ...


3

Our first daughter used to leave her binky everywhere. Eventually we started telling her that the dog would eat it if she left it laying around. Then, one day, "the dog ate it." She howled for a while the first night, had a minor meltdown for the next couple nights, and then that was it. Our second daughter gave it up on her own with very mild prodding. ...


3

It seems that your daughter really wants to stop sucking their thumb but habit sabotages her efforts at night. The following technique has been helpful for other children who wanted to quit. Use an ace bandage and wrap her arm from 6 inches above to 6 inches below her elbow of the arm with the offending thumb. Wrap both if she sucks both. The wrap SHOULD ...


3

As he is only 2-months, there is nothing wrong with him sucking his thumb, its only natural. As he grows older, he will gradually forgo this habit. But at the moment, he is a baby!



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