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41

Kids, even well after toddler years, tend to enjoy a hike in different ways than adults. We like taking our three out for walks in the woods, and have done so from infancy (some great baby pictures of Daddy carrying daughter in a sling!). One possibility is that shorter outings will improve her outlook. Having small expectations was the hardest transition ...


23

This pamphlet, put out by the South Carolina Department of Health, suggests it is safe at one month. You should avoid large crowds, but the fresh air and stimulation is good for baby. You should probably not allow people to touch your baby's hands (since baby may put them in his mouth). Your greater concern in going outside is the weather - keeping baby ...


16

The guideline I've been given by our pediatricians was to avoid anybody with an easily transmittable disease for the first six weeks. The main reason to stay away from crowds and/or strangers is that you don't really know who in the area is ill or contagious. You don't want somebody to sneeze in your kid's face at any age, really, but a newborn is more ...


13

At three or four years old we had this same issue with our oldest daughter. She would get used to me carrying her during the hardest parts of the hike, or when she got tired. Our solution was that I would put her back on her feet when we came across trail markings, and she could only ask for me to pick her back up after two more trail markings have passed. ...


11

I don't think there is any connection to indoors/outdoors and introvert/extrovert. However, a 18 month old is really developing very fast, and should be developing social, motor and language skills. it is not clear from your question if your child is cared for in a nursery/daycare or if he/she is at home with you while you work? Do you mean going 'out' ...


10

When mine were younger, I would give them some of the following: their own fork, shovel and bucket and a piece of soil they could dig in similarly, a toy mower (and a toy vacuum cleaner, which bizarrely was more popular in the garden) a bucket and a hose (turned on, but not too much :-) outdoor bowls and a series of targets play tents a sand pit Duplo lego ...


10

I have never heard that strangers are to be avoided with newborns, and I certainly wouldn't recommend staying inside to avoid them. You need to get out for your own sanity, so get out and go for walks as soon as you can. Exposure to new environments and people is good for babies development, keeping them cooped up indoors and away from social contact is not ...


8

We took our newborn daughter out to a crowded shopping center, on a busy Saturday, at 3 days old. And being our first child, we were being overly careful with her as only a new parent is! Shock/Horror nothing happened. She grew up fine. You should be careful with newborns, they're immune system may not quite be at full power yet, but equally they don't need ...


7

We have a bag that is always packed with diapers, wipes, food pouches, crackers, sippy cup, a bowl, fork & spoon, and a couple of small toys. Before leaving the house we do a quick survey of the bag and make sure that it includes enough of everything for the trip we are taking which only takes a minute or 2 to replenish anything running low. Keeping ...


6

Somebody asked the same question in a new parents support group we were in after the birth of our son. The answer given was, "You already took your baby outside when you went home from the hospital. Find something else to worry about." Being handled by random people is a different story, but merely being outside the home (assuming adequate clothing and sun ...


6

Could it be that those "few hours walk in the woods" exceeded her range (both in physical endurance and attention span) pretty much from the get-go, so you ended up always carrying her towards the end of the hike? (I got kids age 12 and 8 who get bored of a "hike" in much less than "a few hours". They can run around the playground, and do visits to the ...


6

I had the same problem with my four year old and was surprised that just letting her pick out a new colorful pair of running sneakers to "go super fast" was all it took to get her going much further without me carrying her. Maybe I just lucked out, buy you might try making a big deal out of a new shoe purchase. Another idea is grab another kid to go with ...


5

I don't think a specific amount is really definable, in particular because each child is different. However, the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) endorses "Caring for our Children", a set of national standards for childcare environments (ie, daycares). Their recommendation: Outdoor play: Infants (birth to twelve months of age) should be ...


4

One trick which worked marvels for me was, saying to him: if you are tired, you can run and wait for me under that tree over there, sit down and relax. My son was often too tired to walk, but not tired enough to run to a shade under a tree where he can sit and look at me as I was walking.


4

Great question, we have the same problem. What we came up so far: Singing songs, playing games ("I spy with my little eye") etc. Simply telling her that she is too heavy to be carried. Promise a reward if she manages it without carrying.


4

Their own corner of the garden to dig in Paintbrushes and a bucket of water to "Paint" the sidewalk An empty bucket and a pile of rocks I have a yard ornament that looks like a frog with a hole in the mouth, my boys are 2 and love to "feed" the froggy every time we go outside.


4

If you already have purchased the baby carrier, or were going to purchase it anyway - I'd try out the baby carrier first. If you deem that it does not work for you, then you can look into purchasing a car seat that fits in your off-road stroller. With a baby carrier, you are not as restricted by the terrain or small spaces. However, you do have to be a lot ...


3

I'd recommend checking out a baby wrap instead of a carrier. Especially in the infant stage. You can either get one online (my wife got one here and loved it) or make one yourself. They are pretty easy. My wife made one out of lighter material for the hot summer months.


3

The front baby carrier is very hard for your back, but seem to be nicer for baby's neck... We had a carrier that could be switched from front to back position, that was very useful. I would buy a carrier in any case because even if you don't use during hiking, it will be useful when baby is crying: they love it and get asleep very fast in this position.


3

Here in Asia, people are pretty conservative. They don't take babies out until they are 3 months old. We followed that and my child seemed to better than others (perhaps just lucky). I think the issue with the under-developed immune system is good and it is very hard to tell who has an asymptomatic infection disease. So, for my child, I prefer to fall on ...


2

My wife and I went out for a walk on the 3rd day in the hospital park. As long as the kid is wrapped in properly so that it doesn't get cold, everything is fine. Our hospital even provided the buggy and a little jacket for us.


2

It really doesn't take much time to pack a bag, even if it is empty to begin with. What you may find as a new parent is forgetting to pack an essential item, so the two steps to maintaining a baby bag with everything you need are: Keep it packed, as Dave suggested. Monitor the contents and remember to stock up when you are getting low on wipes etc Have an ...


2

For me it really depends on the weather in your region of the world. We went for longer walks progressively, and when the weather was better (no rain, snow, ice or excessive heat). We live in the North of France where it is freezing during winter so we didn't really get outside more than a few minutes with our newborn until he was 2 or 3 months old. On the ...


2

Try an alternative to carrying her the rest of the way. Instead of having her be carried the rest of the way for the hike, start taking short (15 minutes or so) breaks to let her rest for awhile, before continuing on the trail. This will mean that it will take longer for you, and you may have to shorten the full length of the trip, but it will give her ...


1

You are looking at the problem as an adult, look at this as a three year old. I walk -> I don't like it anymore -> I ask to get carried -> I like that... Simple. To break the cycle, communicate the way a three year old would. While you are walking have three year old type conversations, about colors and heaven. Don't walk, go from one place ...


1

The answer to this depends in part on your locality. In the US, some states have no minimum age for it to be legal to allow your minor to be unsupervised, while others do, as old as 12 in the case of my home state (Illinois). Now, that's not necessarily an enforced law, and undoubtedly is meant primarily to apply to fully unsupervised minors (ie, parents ...


1

I'll buck the trend here and say if you have a jogging/offroad stroller (something with inflatable tires that will stand up to a gravel trail), get a carrier for that stroller and use that. We have a Baby Trends system (Expedition ELX) that has a jogging stroller, carrier and car seat base. I love it; it rolls around effortlessly, maneuvers like a dream, ...


1

I would recommend a wrap or an Ergo backpack-they have newborn inserts for it. We had an ergo that I LOVED! It is a soft backpack, that can also be worn in front... it holds them as though they are sitting-which helps their hip joints develop correctly... as opposed to holding them from their crotch. It is comfortable when worn and holds kids up to 60+ ...



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