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5

"Considering that Matthew's craving for sugar is relentless, intense and has been ongoing for years, is it possible that his craving represents a legitimate nutritional need?" I've never heard of such a need personally. But you strike me as a grounded, sensible person trying very hard to find the best path for their child. I think offering a non-sugar ...


3

As an adult I recently overcame my sugar-habit by drinking copious amounts of zero-sugar cola every time I felt the craving coming on. Sometimes I would drink 2 litres a day. Of course I became worried that the artificial sweetener was just as damaging. However once the sugar addiction had gone, I found it easy to give up the cola as well. Now I need neither ...


3

Did children (humans) have access to refined sugar in the last several million years? Obviously not, they mostly only had a rather limited supply of fruit sugar. So, absent any special medical condition, children do not need refined sugar. Otherwise we as a species wouldn't have survived. Sugar in its refined form is mainly pure energy in a form that's ...


2

NO! Refined sugar is very bad for children. Studies have shown that with toddlers, it's also as addictive as Heroin and Cocaine. There was an evolutionary advantage to sugar craving as "cave men" to ensure children got enough calories when they were very young, but refined sugar just over-stimulates this craving in an unhealthy way. There is no ...


2

Dr David Ludwig and Dr Walter Willet published a 2013 opinion column in JAMA Pediatrics that questioned the value of recommending low-fat or skim milk for children. While much of the article is behind a paywall, I did find a discussion of the opinion column (and it was also discussed on Time). Ludwig and Willett argued in their paper that children who ...


2

From the outset, I am not a scientist, and have read a bit about sugar and diet to try and understand things better. What follows is my understanding about sugar. There may be some mistakes here, but I'll try and reference information where I can. It largely depends on what you define as "deprive". If you completely remove all sugars from a child's diet ...


1

You've already got a lot of answers, but I think this is a really important topic and would like to chime in. If you can, I'd recommend you watch a movie called "Fed Up" (http://fedupmovie.com/#/page/home). I saw it on Netflix, but it may be available streaming elsewhere. I'll try to summarize, but the bottom line is it's all about sugar and how it has ...


1

There are a few possible motivations for starting a diet. Actually being overweight. While this may seem a good reason for a child to be on a diet, it's actually still not highly advisable. Restricting calorie intake and snacks can lead to an unhealthy relationship with food and poor self-image in the long term, and raise the risk of eating disorders. ...



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