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20

TL;DR - exclusive breastfeeding: 6 months, partial breast-feeding: 12 months or longer Well, since you asked about research papers, here they are. The optimal duration of exclusive breastfeeding: a systematic review. (abstract) (2004) Based on the results of this review, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution to recommend exclusive ...


15

When my daughter was in elementary (aka primary) school, we did BOTH. When the menu came out every month, we took 5 minutes and identified those days/items that were acceptable to us and to her, and on those days she bought lunch. The remaining days, a lunch was prepared and she took it with her. As she got older, she got more involved in the decision ...


11

"Would fixing them differently be worth trying?" Given the immense number of ways one can prepare eggs, I'd say 'yes'. Each of my kids like eggs in different ways. One loves them hard-boiled or 'runny'. The other likes them scrambled. Given that the way one prepares an egg can dramatically change the texture, I'm thinking it's definitely worth a shot at ...


11

If your child is younger than 12 months, I would refrain from giving cow's milk altogether, see What Happens If a Newborn Drinks Cow Milk? and Cow's milk: When and how to introduce it. Problems which can occur are nutritional deficiencies (most commonly iron deficiency), gastrointestinal irritation or allergic reactions. In general, babies' digestive tracts ...


11

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 - 6 months, certain solid foods may be added. Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and juices ...


10

I noticed in one of the responses that you said you quit offering snacks. Here is a sample of our meal schedule for our 15 month old twins. We seldom offer snacks but stagger meals and milk. By staggering them we get more high calorie/protein milk in them on a regular basis. 7:30 AM 8oz of milk with liquid vitamins (Poly-Vi-Sol) added in 8:30 AM ...


8

My son's day care indicates on a board what meals each child has eaten during the day. I've observed that many children don't eat the snacks and some children eat three serves at lunch time. So just because it's in their schedule doesn't mean your child will be eating every time there is food offered. Each child is different. It's important for development ...


8

From what I've been able to research, personally I would avoid using any gripe water. Beyond the original alcohol content mentioned by Tim Post in his answer, some doctors attribute much of the efficacy to the sugar content, as sugar exerts a natural pain relieving effect on young children. At least some doctors seem to feel gripe water in general is ...


7

One possible way is to not sneak vegetables to children. As children get older, they realize that you're trying to sneak things to them, and it becomes a never ending battle. You should introduce vegetables to them repeatedly until they get used to the idea that vegetables are part of their diet. Eat vegetables with them, keep them around as snacks, and make ...


7

Busy toddlers burn lots of calories. A child that is not gaining weight steadily can be in danger of not meeting their nutritional needs. This is the reason for your physician's concern. Getting your little one to eat more is likely to be very difficult. Therefore, making each mouthful have the greatest caloric impact is the most likely to add those needed ...


7

Let him help prepare the eggs with you. That way, he can be part of the process of making the food itself, and can see where everything comes from. He can also suggest ridiculous ingredients (Honey! Cheerios! etc) and see where those experiments take him. We sat our toddler up on the counter and let him see the entire process of making the eggs. He was ...


6

Nutritionally, there is no difference in the amount of calories or in the breast milk itself. However, the act of nursing requires a baby to use more muscles than are used in sucking a bottle. This means that babies will only drink as much breast milk as needed; whereas bottle fed babies will develop a habit of overeating. Additionally, you touched on ...


6

Is her weight out of proportion to her height, like she is malnourished? Or is she in good proportion but in a low "percentile" or just stalled for a little bit? The former is a much more serious problem, but a lot of doctors freak out about the latter just as much. Children gain weight the same way adults do, with foods very dense in calories such as high ...


6

According to http://www.wholesomebabyfood.com/nitratearticle.htm, the problem is with nitrate levels in carrots. If that's true, the same problem will occur with fresh spinach. As to what the food industry does differently: IIRC, nitrate problems tend to get worse when cooked meals spend time at room temperature. Bacteria from the air will metabolize the ...


6

In most cases, breast milk or formula provides just about everything a baby needs for the first four to six months. The exception is vitamin D, which is recommended as a supplement for breastfed babies and babies who drink less than 32 ounces of formula per day per The Baby Center.


6

Like any other over the counter tonic, it's always a good idea to check with your pediatrician before giving it to your child. Our pedia gives us the riot act if we don't check with her regarding well known cough and cold medications. Gripe water probably worked wonders because of its alcohol content. In fact, the recommended dose for an infant was be ...


5

My son won't eat anything green and leafy. Broccoli, spinach, green beans - you name it. However, he loves soup - and doesn't mind if the soup is green. We have a lot of broccoli, leek and spinach soups, etc and I put spinach in my meatballs and shredded carrots in the spaghetti sauce, etc. Sneaky is good.


5

Our solutions after much trial and error: Texture: One egg scrambled and cooked in a large pan so that it comes out very thin. Can be folded into a sandwich or wrapped around a sausage. Flavor: Hard boiled egg - sliced and served with salsa and cheese (egg nachos) Disguise: Scrambled and stir fried with rice and veggies


5

DHA and EPA are long-chain omega-3 fatty acids which cannot be synthesized by the human body and thus must be ingested either through capsules (which is usually fish oil) or through the foods that we eat. They typically are found together and work both in conjunction with each other and independently of each other to support proper neurological, ...


5

Few things you can try are: Make sure he's getting enough vitamin C which helps with Iron absorption. Limit dairy with meals as calcium in cow's milk inhibits absorption. Make him a smoothie out of fresh spinach and some fruit. The spinach is high in iron and does well blended up with fruit. For finger food snacks, plain old Cheerios are a good source of ...


4

Our toddler's appetite seems to vary in large swings from month to month, but when she's in a phase where she seems to be eating too little we've noticed that different eating positions can affect how much she eats. Sometimes she will only focus and eat much if she's in her high chair w/tray; sometimes she hates the high chair and will eat more feeding ...


4

If you're going to hide veggies in your food, why not get the kids in on it? You could tell your kids about how you want to make daddy more healthy but you don't want him to notice, so you're going to try to sneak veggies into your food. Now that your kids are "in on" the scheme: They won't make a fuss about vegetables, even if they do notice them, because ...


4

For a good book on the subject I would suggest The Sneaky Chef. Pumpkin puree in French toast. Spinach in meatballs and other things of that nature are discussed. It provides a lot of insight on the subject.


4

One thing to think of that I haven't seen mentioned: How many kids eat lunch with your child at the same time? It sounds stupid, but some lunches are so crowded and lunch periods can be so short, that sometimes students who go through the hot lunch line only get about 5-10 minutes to eat their lunch before the period is over and it's time to go back to ...


4

You mentioned that Green Eggs and Ham is one of his favorite stories. Have you tried serving him green eggs? A little drop of food coloring can go a long way. I got both of my boys to drink milk regularly by offering it in different colors. I just add a single drop of food coloring to the cup. Now they ask for milk at every meal.


4

I get my 2 year old to eat eggs with this simple "pancake" recipe: Beat one egg in a little container, add 2-3 tablespoons of oats (1minute or 5minute, no problem!), a little dash of vanilla extract. Mix well and store covered in the fridge overnight so the oatmeal absorbs all the liquid. In the morning, heat a bit of butter in a pan and cook as you would a ...


4

While the benefits of DHA are disputed, it appears that you can start as early as week 18: In the double-blind study, “Prenatal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Infant Morbidity: Randomized Controlled Trial,” published in the September 2011 issue of Pediatrics (published online Aug. 1), pregnant women in Mexico were supplemented daily with 400 mg ...


3

Yes, in my experience it's important to offer between meal snacks. My children lose patience with one another when they are hungry which leads to more disagreements. Snacktime, like a fixed mealtime, encourages them to take a break, recharge, and be social. It's also an opportunity for my kids to practice hospitality with one another (sharing). As for the ...


3

One thing that has not been mentioned here about kids is that they are all about form over function. Kids can be put off by how things look, so one thing we have done to overcome this, is to carve the vegetables into interesting shapes. Carrots make great goldfish, Cucumbers make great Dinosaurs, etc. be creative. Obviously this doesn't work for veggies ...


3

I think there are many variables that will affect your decision: How old is/are your child/children? Can you trust them to make good lunch choices without being present? Does your school publish lunches in advance? Does your child typically eat the same things or do they vary their lunch regularly? Our school system publishes their lunch schedule ...



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