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25

Establish a routine Yes, it's a Supernanny favourite, but we've found that a consistent routine (even printed out and stuck to the wall in vibrant colours) helps children to understand the wake-play-eat-play-bedtime-sleep cycle. The biggest challenge to introducing a routine is when the children rail against it. This requires a lot of patience and ...


18

You might try a little "cry it out". At about nine months, we figured it was time for baby to learn how to sleep through the night. So rather than rushing in to comfort baby immediately, we'd wait 5 minutes after our baby began crying, then go in and comfort baby and let baby know Mom and Dad are there, then leave. Next time it happens, wait 10 minutes, ...


10

As mentioned in your comments, perhaps giving her a high-protein snack pre-bedtime. An egg maybe or even a protein shake. You could make a pretty awesome high-protein, pre-bedtime smoothie with peanut or almond butter, yogurt and/or milk and a fruit of some kind. We know that eating protein helps to sort of stave off hunger by increasing the hormone ...


10

Early weaning probably won't help your baby sleep through the night. http://www.babycentre.co.uk/baby/sleep/solidsexpert/ No research supports this belief. Young babies given solid food (and this includes rice cereal in their bottle) at a young age, do not sleep any better than babies who are not given solid foods. It's an old wives' tale based on ...


7

Cut back to two naps a day and move up the bedtime. Bedtime at 10 and midnight is NOT good for a child of that age; or anyone for that matter. You are fighting the natural circadian cycle. Move the bedtime up to 8 and follow a defined structure for bedtime. In addition they are not hungry at that age; it has simply become habit.


7

One thing to consider is that this may be a case of you thinking "Oh, he's being nocturnal" because you notice it more when he's up at night, whereas when he's awake during the day, that's "normal". Babies sleep a lot, but in shorter bursts than adults, so "Night-Time" has less meaning to their sleep patterns. According to most sources, a newborn baby ...


7

As I tend to do around here, here's something nobody has mentioned: It might just be who he is. Of my kids, 3 of them (20, 18, 10) are normal. My 8 is a morning person. Regardless of bedtime, like staying up late on Friday watchin movies, he's up at 6:30 on Saturday. He also sleeps the heaviest and is easiest to wake up on school days. Conversely, his 6yo ...


6

Looking at her diet it is actually too healthy! Children should get half their calories from fat, and have high protein levels as well. They should get their veggies to be sure, but stoke her up on high energy, long-lasting stuff that "sticks to your ribs" as my grandfather said. Chuck some cheeseburgers and fries her way! Good dairy fats are something easy ...


5

One thing that helped us a lot with our first kid is treating night-time like it's night-time. At first when she needed to wake up to eat, we would turn on the lights and sometimes even talk to her. Soon, though, we figured if she's ever going to learn to sleep through the night, we have to treat night-time different than daytime. We stopped turning on the ...


5

Put simply - don't allow him to stay up and play that late. Unfortunately, it isn't always that easy. Other than Andrei's good tips about late afternoon/early evening activity, here are some more suggestions to help (we've got a 5 year old who hates to sleep too). No toys in the bedroom. Remove as many distractions as possible. Get a routine and stick to ...


5

One of my nannies used a trick on me and I have used it since then and it has worked well. She put her hand in her pocket and handed me an imagined object, an invisible wish stone. And she then told me that I would always have this wish stone with me when I was dreaming. And I could wish for anything and it would happen in the dream. I could even use it to ...


4

Suddenly waking up hysterical or crying out in sleep can also be a sign of overtiredness. When a child becomes overtired it is more difficult for the child to sleep, but at the same time the child desperately needs and wants sleep. This leads to loud crying for up to several minutes in sleep or even wake-ups during which the child is very upset to be ...


4

Night Terrors tend to occur at predictable times during the night; Not that observing the child will tell if the night terror will occur, but rather that it forms a regular pattern. According to Wikipedia, the disorder will die off over time, and the issue will have been resolved. If it isn't, Wikipedia suggests psychotherapy or medication. Night Terrors, ...


4

Our child is also five, so first off; My condolences. We've discovered two main things that keep him getting actually tired at bed time: First. If we can really get him to run around in the 4-5:30 time frame (about 1-2 hrs before dinner) he really burns up energy. Second. We try to keep his dinner solidly at least 90 minutes before bed. We've had him on ...


4

Unfortunately, you are best off waiting it out. At around 6 months, you can start supplementing his meals with some baby-safe cereals (rice cereal is a very common first solid food). However, you should consult with your pediatrician first. It is important to note that formula will remain the primary source of nutrition until he is roughly one year old. ...


4

Oh, the joys of the night-waking toddler. My daughter was a terrible sleeper and woke at all kinds of random, crazy times. Rarely did she ever sleep for more than three hours at a time and she often woke us, wandered the house or turned on the tv by herself. She never went outside though, thankfully. First, if they haven't already done so, I would recommend ...


4

Given your description, it is not paranormal, it is NORMAL :) These are called night terrors, which children in that age have, and they are perfectly normal. You may still want to check this out with your pediatrician, since the normal age for night terrors to develop is 3 years old+ (though children as young as 6 mos. can also have them). If you want to ...


4

You may not actually be dealing with nightmares. You may be dealing with night terrors. From the NIH website (linked), night terrors are disturbed sleep, usually waking up in a terrified state. They are common from ages 3-7, usually in boys, but not uncommon in girls. The cause is unknown, but the site indicates that stress, emotional tension, fever, or lack ...


3

Here's what my boss (with two kids aged >3 who both sleep through the night) advocates; I'm going to try it with my kid and see what happens. First, create a distinction between day and night. TV, music, lights are all on during the day. It's a time of excitement and activity. At night, dim the lights, no music or TV on, and no play. They'll learn that ...


3

I'm not a pediatrician, but it DOES sound like night-terrors. She's right at the age where night-terrors typically start, and her behavior sounds like it's incredibly out of the ordinary. Some children who are in the middle of a night terror can appear to be awake (eyes open, up and moving around, etc.), but they're not. This is a great YouTube video by ...


3

It looks like Kari Gunnarsson has about half of what my answer would be in a really fun way. Put simply - teach your child he can control his dreams once he knows it is a dream! Best advice I was ever given as a child myself too! I would Add a couple more things though too. If there is something specific in the dreams that are scary and your child can ...


3

I think Chrys' comment is correct. Also, it takes a while for the baby to find and settle into her own personal rhythm, and there is lots of variation between babies. You're probably right that 13 hours per day is on the low side but that doesn't automatically make it something to worry over. Give it two more weeks and you'll see a sleep pattern. You can ...


3

That sounds like an absolute NIGHTMARE. If he's not a fan of loud noises, they could also add door alarms so that if he opens off-limits doors, the alarm goes off (doesn't have to be a full security system, and I know there are door alarm systems where you can turn the alert on and off). I honestly don't believe a simple lock on the bedroom door for a child ...


2

Our son started doing something similar but not quite as bad. It turned out that is was largely due to his bed. He apparently could not get comfortable and it was becoming too small for him. We went out and purchased a larger bed for him and the number of instances of that happening have gone way down. He was in a toddler bed before and he moved into a full ...


2

our daughter had, what we were told were, night terrors. we were advised to not wake her or try to understand what she was saying. we simply made sure she was safe, sang a song, and left the room. she seemed to grow out of it. believe me it is hard to leave them - she would be screaming and seem to be in pain, but i was told, and believe, that she was not ...


2

The clinginess and lower appetite has absolutely nothing to do with night weaning, most likely. It is 100% normal at this age. Separation and stranger anxiety are very common in 11 month olds. This behavior may last, with some ebb and flow, until 18 months or even later. Also clinginess is associated with developmental leaps, and there is one around 11 ...


2

Most modern baby monitors use digital transmission (most often the DECT standard). This means that you can have two identical devices turned on right next to each other, and you only have to figure out which receiver is connected to which base unit.


2

A humidifier helps, but even more effective than that is to apply Vaseline to the nostrils using a Q-tip. Do it every night before going to bed, and hope that eventually he will grow out of it.


2

My daughter has the same problem, and a humidifier in her room helped resolve some of it. We did take her to the doctor but she basically said to keep her fingers our of her nose, which has been a challenge. Without other symptoms like a fever or earaches there isn't really anything that can be done medically. If it persists for more then 3 days then take ...


2

There are a lot of possibilities, but a few to check. Definitely talk to your pediatrician as soon as you can, both because it's possible there could be an underlying medical issue, and your doctor will know your child better than random strangers on the internet and have good advice. Acid reflux. Is it worst when he's lying down? Try not feeding him ...



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