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2

From some googling around, yes, it is safe [1] [2]. BUT there is a caveat. Whenever you blow air (either through the mouth or the nose), some particles from these cavities are carried by the exiting air. Always some flakes of dry nose secretion are expelled when you breathe through the nose, more if you breathe heavily or sneezes. (that is why some ...


4

Blowing on the face is a common trick. It triggers a reflex to hold the breath for a short moment. That stops the crying, and can also be used when washing the child's face etc. I am not aware of any consequences of this, neither positive nor negative.


1

Gluten absolutely passes through breast milk. Many doctors and the medical community at large are not up on what gluten is and how it affects us all. After thousands of dollars and allergists and gastroenterologists in a 60mi radius from our house a naturopath suggested gluten and dairy free for my mom diet to help my 8 mo old. It worked like a charm. And ...


3

If you are blowing softly, it could hardly harm the child. Anything under 3 knots should be fine.


0

In the US, the American Academy of Pediatrics have a number of recommendations for reducing SIDS. For their site healtychildren.org, the page on newborn sleep and SIDS has number of recommendations, including: Place your baby to sleep in the same room where you sleep but not the same bed. Keep the crib or bassinet within an arm’s reach of your bed. You ...


0

Definitely agree that you should not have the baby far from your room, unless you're not breastfeeding and don't mind putting a second adult bed or couch in the baby room for the first few months. There are plenty of options for what to sleep the infant in, however: Moses basket for the first month or two Bassinet - doesn't have to be an expensive one, ...


0

My daughter had slept in her bed (120/60 cm) from the start and had no trouble moving to another room from our bedroom. At first she almost always stayed in the position we laid her in, but later she seemed to make a good use of all the extra space by rolling around. If you make a decision which makes the baby sleep a long way from you, you will change the ...


1

In my experience, newborns sleep best when firmly attached to a parent. :) The second-best is some sleeping place that is small enough that they feel limitations to all sides, especially around their heads. However, this could just as well be between their parents or in a bigger bed of their own that is downsized by a few cushions. Another experience I ...


3

From your description of your living space, I would recommend keeping the baby in the bassinet in your room, at least for the first couple of months. Newborns, especially breast fed ones, wake every 2-3 hours to feed. Having the baby close is convenient (no stairs) and lets you respond before the real hungry-angry crying starts. It's much easier to feed a ...


-1

It does not affect their sleep cycle yet, but definitely is perceptable. If you do this consistently, you may, in a few months, discover that that your baby takes a bath really well, has fun in it, and goes to sleep afterwards without much fussing - and your friend's baby, who wasn't undergoing the same routine since that long, does not. I have no research ...


2

First and foremost: Children are the product of what they themselves bring to the table and what the environment does to them. The former is important, because essentially it says: Every single child is different. What works with one child might fail with the next one. Keep this in mind and remember that you will have to find out for yourself. _For each of ...


9

If you are asking, "Is a disrupted sleep schedule harmful to my 1 month old?", the answer is no. Sleep is important to newborns, and they will sleep when it's necessary. Babies in utero are attuned to a mother's circadian rhythms, due in part to maternal hormones (cortisol and melatonin both pass through the placenta), maternal activity and other ...



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