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19

My wife, almost two weeks after a C-section, is able to do practically all work related to baby care. Only baths are left to me, and even then she does assist me. I'd like to think we do 50% of the work, but actually she probably does more. I am currently on a leave and soon I will go to work - and during the day she will have to take care of our baby on her ...


14

Wow!! I feel for you. Being a new parent is exhausting, nerve-wracking and a little confusing = it really does take a village. To anwer the question about what your wife can or cannot do, I'll share my experience (though everyone's is different and I don't know which complications she had etc, etc) I had a c-section and was up and moving around doing ...


14

Sleep deprivation comes with being a parent of a baby, however you will cope. It isn't fun but you will get through it. Although you cannot avoid it here are some general recommendations: Get your baby on a routine: Every parent I know that tried baby-led sleep patterns gave up and instituted a routine, because they really help get your child on a sleep ...


12

You should check for feces between the labia and wipe any globules away as needed. Infections can and will arise if stuff is allowed to sit there. You can gently spread the labia to get a good look and make sure there isn't anything "hiding" in a fold. Soaps and other kinds of cleansers can also create problems so use a moistened cotton ball or swab ...


11

It sounds like you have a normal newborn just like the rest of us did at some point (or some of us are hoping to have). They all have preferences, and may be uncomfortable in some positions and not in others. Our job is to feed them, change them, and make sure that they are as comfortable as possible. Their job is to challenge us by sending mixed messages ...


10

It's not secreted by the baby. It's just clothes fluff / lint getting caught between their fingers (their fingers being quite sticky with normal skin secretions), and they're not using their hands or washing them like we do which would normally wipe the clothing fluff off with it. See eg ...


10

The key thing about lifting under the arms is that it's harder to support the head and neck, you'd have to use your hands as support, rather than the crook of your arm. So it's less about age, and more about head control. If your baby is able to hold her head up to look around, then it's fine to pick her up under her arms. If the minute you try it, her head ...


8

This pose is actually 100% photo-edited. You take a sleeping kid, prop them in two different ways with your hands supporting them, then merge the two different pictures. In the first shot, the photographer or an assistant holds the baby's head. In the second the arms are held. The two shots are merged so that it looks as if no one was holding the baby. But ...


8

I spent the majority of my time in NICU, when I could not hold my son, holding his little hand in the incubator. (Probably helped me more than him, but who knows?) Soon as the docs will allow it, ask for some kangaroo time. Physical contact is a great bonding facilitator. Sing to them. My son, now 30 months old and out of NICU for QUITE a while, still ...


8

Remember that your baby just spent months in a cozy, warm, dark womb. Being out in the light and the cool, dry air is unfamiliar. And crying is the only way to express discomfort - babies cry for hunger, for tiredness, for being too cold or too hot, for wanting to be held... When you hold him, try to snuggle him up like he was in the womb. He is not used ...


7

In rare cases, if mom hs certain types of inffectious diseases, this can be a problem because they can spread - but for most people not at all. In fact, it is completely normal for blood to be in the milk (especially with first-time moms) anyway (even with healthy nipples). You just don't always see it because it is in such small amounts. It can make ...


7

Sounds like your baby has hit her first growth spurt. Expect her to feed more frequently, sleep less and be cranky for a few days, possibly longer. More info here: http://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/ask-heidi/baby-growth-spurts.aspx


7

To reduce sleep deprivation, sleep when the baby sleeps and do not prioritize tidying or cleaning over sleeping. Work out what things you can do in the company of an awake baby and do those things then so that you can sleep. Many babies love to be in a sling while you shop, vacuum, or read something, or to be in a baby seat or swing while you cook or tidy. ...


7

Absolutely. What you're seeing is entirely normal in babies, particularly around 3+ months old. Among other things, he might be beginning to teethe; both of those things are associated with teething. Drooling is associated with basically everything for many babies, and sucking on fingers (or thumbs or other things) is also very normal. If the drooling is ...


7

Nope. If you would be more comfortable keeping an eye on them, there are mirrors you can install that allow you to see them in your rear view mirror. However, you will be wise to watch the road instead of the sleeping babies in the back seat; every newborn I've ever met just sleeps in the car so you won't be missing much.


6

To answer question number 4. "He sleeps much more better on my chest" is natural, and it's good to him. Please refer "Kangaroo care (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kangaroo_care)".


6

When a newborn falls asleep, he or she falls first into a light sleep. If you wait 15-30 minutes (20 minutes is a good guess usually), your newborn will transition to deep sleep. A good test to see if your newborn is in a deep sleep is the floppy arm test. Pick up an arm and see how floppy it is when you gently let go. The arm of a newborn in light sleep is ...


6

You should definitely call the lactation counselor if you haven't already. They will give individualized advice that no one here can. In addition, they will also provide some reassurance that your baby IS getting enough to eat, that you are doing ok, and that your baby is going to be ok. Call them. In the meantime: 1) Tickle the baby's feet 2) Change the ...


6

We adopted our middle child and his older and younger sisters are biological. Out of the three, our son craves attention the most, by a factor of five. We were told in our fostering and adoption classes that is fairly typical. He doesn't remember the first year of his life when he didn't live with us, but it still subconsciously affects him. So, sibling ...


5

For a newborn, no this is not a problem at all - it is perfectly normal. Your baby has spent the last few months held really tightly, so this new world is definitely a shock to the system. What many parents do is move to swaddling - with the arms tightly wrapped - to help baby sleep easily. It actually sounds like your baby is doing quite well - many won't ...


5

Somebody asked the same question in a new parents support group we were in after the birth of our son. The answer given was, "You already took your baby outside when you went home from the hospital. Find something else to worry about." Being handled by random people is a different story, but merely being outside the home (assuming adequate clothing and sun ...


5

If your one month old is regularly crying for 3 hour stretches or more and you've tried everything, then you are probably wondering if your child is a normal baby, is simply colicky, or if your child has another digestive issue. Colic The thinking about colic changes regularly. The standard definition is that colic is crying for 3 hours or more for 3 or ...


5

To the other excellent answers, I would also add that many new mothers experience a lack of confidence, and sometimes this is made worse by the fact that they had to have a C-section (it is a bit irrational, but it can feel like you somehow failed at your first basic task of motherhood). As you have taken over much of the care, it may have made her feel more ...


5

For mine, it wasn't the song, it was that I was the singer. I chose from my favorites, so my kids got lots of Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday, but honestly, I could have sung Black Sabbath and they could've cared less, so long as it was sung in a quiet, soothing fashion. If you need some specifics, there were several threads at the HiveMind that I ...


5

It might sound harsh, but there's not much you can do to make it enjoyable; if you're on your belly and aren't strong enough to raise your head up yet, tummy time is not going to be fun. However, you can limit the upset for your child by not putting her through an excessive amount - little and often is better than fewer long stints. (Advice on how long it ...


5

These seats are designed to be newborn-friendly. Any of them causing any physical damage to a child is unthinkable. Such seat should never have been made and accepted for sale. Unless you bought the cheapest seat on a flea market, you're going to be ok. Long trips are discouraged because your child is restricted to the same position for their duration. If a ...


4

Answering the question at the top. You don't. Let them sleep in the most comfortable safe position. If it is just for taking pictures of your little puppet, follow Chrys's instruction.


4

You could always put a nice thick blanket in a dryer, test the heat level, and place it at the base of the changing table to keep his back side warm. If you have a changing table they typically have a cover but make sure its 100% cotton and you could warm that up. You can also buy some pads like these that are pure cotton. When also changing you could take ...


4

A lot of German families (including mine!) use a kind of heat lamp called a Wickeltisch-Heizstrahler which translates to change table heater. I haven't experienced them outside of Germany, but it could help. They are available in models that can be bolted into the wall above the change table or are attached to a stand that would go near it. They provide a ...



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