Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

One of the main reasons a newborn (particularly such a new newborn!) dislikes diaper changes is the fact that they're cold. Really cold. Normally they have this nice warm layer on them that keeps them warm and cozy, and you're ripping that off of them with nary a care for their ... well, I'm sure that's what the newborn thinks, anyway. To avoid this, you ...


15

a woman should biologically feel some form of affection towards these small humans No. That's a social rule, not a biological one. You're not alone. Some women adore all babies and children. My kid's teacher wholeheartedly enjoys spending her days surrounded by dozens of young children. Some women are pretty into their own kids, but find other (or ...


11

Blowing on the face is a common trick. It triggers a reflex to hold the breath for a short moment. That stops the crying, and can also be used when washing the child's face etc. I am not aware of any consequences of this, neither positive nor negative.


10

So this doesn't seem too unusual to me. Many babies prefer to be held, and some more than others. A few suggestions: Have you tried swaddling? The feeling of being wrapped mimics the feeling in the womb, and my babies would not sleep without being swaddled. have you tried a swing? Some babies really like the gentle rocking motion (again, this mimics the ...


9

If you are asking, "Is a disrupted sleep schedule harmful to my 1 month old?", the answer is no. Sleep is important to newborns, and they will sleep when it's necessary. Babies in utero are attuned to a mother's circadian rhythms, due in part to maternal hormones (cortisol and melatonin both pass through the placenta), maternal activity and other ...


8

Warning - this may seem mean I'm glad you stood up to say this. I'm a dad and not quite the same scenario, but even after having 2 daughters who are not quite out of the crying phase I can tell you the sound of crying is just about the most annoying thing you can hear. Part of me thinks it's supposed to be though. I have found ways to deflect my kids from ...


7

Nope. If you would be more comfortable keeping an eye on them, there are mirrors you can install that allow you to see them in your rear view mirror. However, you will be wise to watch the road instead of the sleeping babies in the back seat; every newborn I've ever met just sleeps in the car so you won't be missing much.


7

Absolutely. What you're seeing is entirely normal in babies, particularly around 3+ months old. Among other things, he might be beginning to teethe; both of those things are associated with teething. Drooling is associated with basically everything for many babies, and sucking on fingers (or thumbs or other things) is also very normal. If the drooling is ...


6

These seats are designed to be newborn-friendly. Any of them causing any physical damage to a child is unthinkable. Such seat should never have been made and accepted for sale. Unless you bought the cheapest seat on a flea market, you're going to be ok. Long trips are discouraged because your child is restricted to the same position for their duration. If a ...


6

I frequently front-carried my children (from newborn through toddlerhood) for hours at a time. However, we had a sling and so they were more curled up: no dangling legs until they were older (around the time they had neck control and wanted to be looking around all the time). I'm therefore making some guesses when I say it should be safe. I did read over ...


6

Strictly breastfed babies may have from 10 diapers with stool a day, to one diaper with stool every seven to ten days. Breast milk can be so perfectly suited to the newborn that the newborn is able to absorb absolutely everything in the milk, and the only waste is liquid :) The important thing is that the newborn is urinating frequently, and has many wet ...


6

If you stated you really wanted to be a mom, but were repulsed by babies, this answer would be different. But I don't hear that. So this is a lot about not wanting children, which should be the first step in decision-making. Many people ignore that having a baby is a crisis situation (albeit a normal crisis): you are suddenly called upon to take on a ...


6

Get some books to build up your confidence. The "What to expect..." books are too built up and drawn out. Too much of everything. Simple, cool books are attractive reads and hold adequate amount of content. I liked "Eat Sleep Poop". These books will not give you as much "what to do" advice, but what you should not freak out about. This is important. ...


6

By making himself sick do you mean he's spitting up? That's fairly common among newborns, for a variety of reasons. I'll mention a few here, although it's definitely something worth talking about with your pediatrician at your next check-up to make sure there's no acid reflux or other reason he might be spitting up more than normal, and to make sure he's ...


5

@anongoodnurse's answer is great, but I want to add some things from personal observation: I have flown with a baby as young as 4 months, and it was not an issue. The younger the baby is the easier, since they sleep more. I think a 7 week baby will be fine (provided no health issues, not pre-mature and so forth). ask you pediatrician if there is any ...


5

Please note that some airlines will not let you breastfeed on a flight, regardless of what is said when you purchase a ticket. For the first few weeks of a newborn's life, usually the baby's doctor prefers that she be kept in relative isolation (friends and family). After that, it's fine to take her out into the public provided that the baby is healthy. ...


5

If you are blowing softly, it could hardly harm the child. Anything under x knots should be fine, where x is a reasonable value determined by humourless scientists.


5

It might sound harsh, but there's not much you can do to make it enjoyable; if you're on your belly and aren't strong enough to raise your head up yet, tummy time is not going to be fun. However, you can limit the upset for your child by not putting her through an excessive amount - little and often is better than fewer long stints. (Advice on how long it ...


5

I believe that your father could potentially be putting your newborn at risk, yes. Here's why: According to a 2-year survey, 64% of travelers to 3rd world countries develop some sort of illness. 26% of those travelers were ill once they returned from the trip, with 56% of those travelers' illnesses starting after the return (9.3% of all travelers). Thus, ...


5

I decided to throw this answer in here for completeness, to be a little more general. It depends. My first was 4 weeks early, and we calculated based on his actual birthday. This was based on advice from our pediatrician. (and he did, and he caught up on height/weight by 6 months) However, 4 weeks is not that early (given that in the US, 3 weeks early ...


4

Can you wear him? My preemie LOVED being worn, and it freed up my hands to do the other things that needed doing. Try a Moby wrap or something similar; there are oodles of how-to videos online that show you how to properly tie is so he's safe and secure and able to breathe freely, and you get your hands back.


4

Urine is sterile leaving the bladder but doesn't stay that way for long; it is an ideal growth medium for bacteria. I would rinse it out. There is nothing terribly wrong with getting clean water in your baby's ears. You will not get water in the inner ear (that is the third and deepest part of the ear) or the middle ear (where ear infections occur). The ...


4

From your description of your living space, I would recommend keeping the baby in the bassinet in your room, at least for the first couple of months. Newborns, especially breast fed ones, wake every 2-3 hours to feed. Having the baby close is convenient (no stairs) and lets you respond before the real hungry-angry crying starts. It's much easier to feed a ...


4

This is what Wikipedia had to say: The evidence base for CST is sparse and a demonstrated biologically plausible mechanism is lacking. In the absence of rigorous, well-designed randomized controlled trials, it has been characterized as pseudoscience, and its practice called quackery. Linked to two deaths Relying on CST instead of effective ...


4

In our case, what helped was: Reassure her and calm her. Make sure she can see your face or at least your hand all the time. Hear you encouraging her. Part of the problem might be that it's simply a startling new experience for her; OR that she's stressed over less visual contact. Also in terms of startling, make sure to put her on her tummy gently and ...


4

Tummy time is complicated at that age, but it's definitely necessary. Don't expect anything to work perfectly, but also don't do it past the point of her being frustrated; helping her enjoy it is critical to getting longer periods in later. At 12 weeks you likely can only do a short bit at a time (10-15 minutes at most, I'd expect more like 3-5 minutes ...


4

I think there are two aspects to your question which need to be considered: Carrying a baby in general (using any type of carrier) Your particular baby carrier Regarding point 1, carrying a baby using a baby carrier is thought to be good for the baby in many ways, especially for a newborn. It is especially popular in attachment parenting and often ...


4

This answer might be a bit might "longish" because this question can't be answered with a simple date... On SIDS in general: First things first: SIDS has been a subject of extensive research, but there is still no "final" answer what causes it. Statisticians have gone wild on potential risk factors, determining an entire list of what increases the risk of ...


4

Yes, many resources exist that provide instructions for everything you "need" to know to care for your newborn infant. One that I've found that has good information, illustrations, and working links is Raising Children's newborn section. Here's the links to the topics you specifically asked for: Bathing and Washing Bath Safety Nutrition and Feeding Sun ...


4

We had the same problem. Then the nurse suggested to feed the baby before changing him. So my wife would feed him from one side, letting the baby soothe, then we would change him (without crying this time), finally feed on the other side. Make sure you make the baby burp before changing, or the "handling" may cause reflux. My son was born in winter, so we ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible