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16

My wife, almost two weeks after a C-section, is able to do practically all work related to baby care. Only baths are left to me, and even then she does assist me. I'd like to think we do 50% of the work, but actually she probably does more. I am currently on a leave and soon I will go to work - and during the day she will have to take care of our baby on her ...


15

Your body will (except in very rare cases) produce as much milk as your baby needs. There are several ways of messing with this supply and demand system, though, and one of them is by supplementing with formula. You see, once feeding has been established, your breast will produce as much milk as you empty out of it(empty is not really the right word here, as ...


14

It is probably just vernix: Vernix is a greasy white substance that coats and protects baby’s skin in the mother’s uterus. Some babies are born with lots of vernix still on their skin. It is harmless and can be washed or wiped off. Losing vernix may cause the skin to peel during the first week of life. This is normal and will go away on its own. ...


14

Sleep deprivation comes with being a parent of a baby, however you will cope. It isn't fun but you will get through it. Although you cannot avoid it here are some general recommendations: Get your baby on a routine: Every parent I know that tried baby-led sleep patterns gave up and instituted a routine, because they really help get your child on a sleep ...


13

This is not as dangerous as you think. Make sure your child is sleeping on a relatively firm surface, without squishy bumpers on the sides, and the baby will be fine. But still, when you put your child to sleep, start with the the back. Yes SIDS is a real danger, and there are indeed studies that show the risk increases when the baby sleeps on his stomach. ...


12

You should be nursing 10-12 times per day in order to make sure your body produces enough milk (the more you nurse, the more it produces) and also to prevent engorgement. Aim for feeding about every 2 hours during the day and every 4 hours at night. You will know if she is taking enough in by how much is coming out the other end. By day 9, a newborn should ...


12

According to the US. Department of Health & Human Services brochure on sleep positioning for infants: Studies show that, during early infancy, it is unusual for a baby who is placed in the back sleep position to roll onto his or her stomach.20 However, once infants are more developmentally advanced, they often roll over on their own. In this ...


12

Wow!! I feel for you. Being a new parent is exhausting, nerve-wracking and a little confusing = it really does take a village. To anwer the question about what your wife can or cannot do, I'll share my experience (though everyone's is different and I don't know which complications she had etc, etc) I had a c-section and was up and moving around doing ...


11

It sounds like you have a normal newborn just like the rest of us did at some point (or some of us are hoping to have). They all have preferences, and may be uncomfortable in some positions and not in others. Our job is to feed them, change them, and make sure that they are as comfortable as possible. Their job is to challenge us by sending mixed messages ...


10

No, a child will not teach themselves to develop a new "language" to express themselves, at least not by any generally accepted definition of the term "language". Language is a complex tool used by multiple people or a community. A single child who is never exposed to verbal language does not make up their own... what would be the point if no one ...


10

It's not secreted by the baby. It's just clothes fluff / lint getting caught between their fingers (their fingers being quite sticky with normal skin secretions), and they're not using their hands or washing them like we do which would normally wipe the clothing fluff off with it. See eg ...


10

The key thing about lifting under the arms is that it's harder to support the head and neck, you'd have to use your hands as support, rather than the crook of your arm. So it's less about age, and more about head control. If your baby is able to hold her head up to look around, then it's fine to pick her up under her arms. If the minute you try it, her head ...


9

It will be difficult, if not impossible, for you to get much time for yourself in the first few months if it is just you and the baby. Especially in the first month or so, you'll be struggling to find time just to sleep. Your entire routine will be overthrown, and it will be hard enough just finding time enough to do basic necessities while balancing the ...


9

For a 10 day old, I'd not use soap at all. From the Mayo Clinic: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends sponge baths until the umbilical cord stump falls off — which might take up to three weeks... Wet the washcloth, wring out excess water and wipe your baby's face. There's no need to use soap.


8

Well, since you know she's having a sister, I'm guessing your wife is pretty far along in her pregnancy. Obviously, the sooner you get started, the better. Discussing with your daughter that mommy is going to have a new baby and sort of figuring out what your daughter understands about babies. Some kids sort of have this idea when Daddy and Mommy say ...


8

Getting a good latch is indeed very important, and if you suspect your baby is not latching properly now is a very good time to work on it, before it becomes a hard-to-break-habit for your child to latch in a suboptimal way. First, the size of the areola, "the brown part of the breast", varies between women. Some women have very small areolas, others have ...


8

This pose is actually 100% photo-edited. You take a sleeping kid, prop them in two different ways with your hands supporting them, then merge the two different pictures. In the first shot, the photographer or an assistant holds the baby's head. In the second the arms are held. The two shots are merged so that it looks as if no one was holding the baby. But ...


8

I spent the majority of my time in NICU, when I could not hold my son, holding his little hand in the incubator. (Probably helped me more than him, but who knows?) Soon as the docs will allow it, ask for some kangaroo time. Physical contact is a great bonding facilitator. Sing to them. My son, now 30 months old and out of NICU for QUITE a while, still ...


8

Remember that your baby just spent months in a cozy, warm, dark womb. Being out in the light and the cool, dry air is unfamiliar. And crying is the only way to express discomfort - babies cry for hunger, for tiredness, for being too cold or too hot, for wanting to be held... When you hold him, try to snuggle him up like he was in the womb. He is not used ...


7

This is the "forbidden experiment"-- linguist wish they new more about this because it has implications for other questions. But doing this to children is barbaric child abuse. So we wait for natural experiments to arise. The best documented ones are the ones Beofett covered, so I won't repeat that part. The cases of feral children and children locked up ...


7

As a former nurse and mother of 5 I have to say that when my daughter brought home a leaflet on how to reduce the risk of SIDS I tore it up and threw it away. She was a young first time mother and the last thing she needed if, God forbid, anything had happened to her daughter was to be given the impression that something she did or did not do was the cause. ...


7

Until the age of two the bone plates in his skull won't be fused, so yes, head massage that might move the bones would be a bad idea. Maybe just a very gentle scalp massage instead? As for back massage, just turn his head to the side so he can breathe freely. Infant massage can be beneficial for everyone, so long as you move slowly, respond to his cues ...


7

Don't expect to have much, if any time for activities other than caring for your baby. Taking care of an infant is normally very time-consuming, and should be prioritized before hobbies. One thing you can do though is get a really good smartphone you can bring with you at all times; it could serve as a digital hub for staying up to date with news, ...


7

I poked around a bit on some of the links suggested by La Leche League, well-known experts on breast-feeding, and found some information that may answer your underlying question. On their "is baby getting enough milk?" resources page, I found a link to a useful description of the baby's eating process. One part in particular sounded very familiar to me, ...


7

You should check for feces between the labia and wipe any globules away as needed. Infections can and will arise if stuff is allowed to sit there. You can gently spread the labia to get a good look and make sure there isn't anything "hiding" in a fold. Soaps and other kinds of cleansers can also create problems so use a moistened cotton ball or swab ...


7

In rare cases, if mom hs certain types of inffectious diseases, this can be a problem because they can spread - but for most people not at all. In fact, it is completely normal for blood to be in the milk (especially with first-time moms) anyway (even with healthy nipples). You just don't always see it because it is in such small amounts. It can make ...


7

Sounds like your baby has hit her first growth spurt. Expect her to feed more frequently, sleep less and be cranky for a few days, possibly longer. More info here: http://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/ask-heidi/baby-growth-spurts.aspx


7

To reduce sleep deprivation, sleep when the baby sleeps and do not prioritize tidying or cleaning over sleeping. Work out what things you can do in the company of an awake baby and do those things then so that you can sleep. Many babies love to be in a sling while you shop, vacuum, or read something, or to be in a baby seat or swing while you cook or tidy. ...


6

I tend to agree with Gruber on this one: "you" time will be minimal. Keep in mind that you're going to spend: 15-20 minutes nursing/feeding your child probably 6-8 times per day (possibly more) for the first couple of weeks--this could be as often as every 2 hours depending on your child. Also, some kids just take longer to eat in general and that ...



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