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13

Nicknames - people (especially in Australia) will always have their names reduced to the minimum number of syllables. Make sure you're happy with the shortened name as well as the full name. If your surname is Head, you probably do not want to call your son Richard. Pronouncability is a big one. I wanted to call my daughter Jale (pronounced Ja-lair in ...


9

My mom died before my kids were born. My father remarried after my kids were born. We struggle with the question of names too. I think to answer this question you need to first ask yourself how important names/titles really are (some would say it's just a name) and then ask yourself how important the person is and how this name would make them feel. My ...


9

Let each kid decide. I changed my last name when I was ten and my mother remarried. I got to make the decision myself, and I don't think I did the wrong decision. And don't forget to consider the names themselves in the decision. Unusual names have their benefit as you get less mixups, and names should be easy to pronounce in many countries (ie no weird ...


8

Being a twin, I deeply appreciate that my name is distinctly different from my twin's name. Here are some aspects that come to my mind. Choose similar-sounding names if you want these aspects; avoid similar-sounding names if you don't: Pros of similar-sounding names can be easier to say quickly, i.e. they flow naturally from the tongue. emphasize that ...


8

I don't think you should have criteria as such, but maybe a list of things to think of. And here is mine: The name should be easy to pronounce, even in cultures where a second language is unusual, such as the US. This does tend to mean that English names have an edge there. The name should contain A-Z only (or if you are using non-latin scripts, it should ...


8

I'm sure that lots of people are called Thomas without being a twin, and they're fine with that. No Thomas I know is a twin1). On the other hand, I am a twin, and neither I nor my brother are named Thomas. Is this meaning the primary reason for your naming concern? To answer your question, what do I think you should do: Either change his name early, or ...


7

I guess if you want to check a single name, then Wolfram Alpha is a good place to start. For the input name patrick you get various stastics regarding rank and fractions a timeline for the fraction estimates of age and number currently living people with this name a plot of the age distribution and of course the most important: celebrities with ...


6

If he behaves like a grampa, I think he deserves to be called grampa. We call my stepfather grandad (even though I call him by his first name). It can be more complicated if the real grandfather also is around and resents sharing the title with the step-granddad. In that case I would let the real grandfather have a veto.


6

I would suggest that you leave the name as is. Its just a temporary feeling that name doesn't suit him. Let the feeling pass.


6

Being from India, our criteria was: How will it sound to international English speakers? Will the initials unitentionally turn out obscene i.e. stuff like BJ rejected. Does it have a meaning with positive connotations? Hearing the name, people should not be ambiguous if it's a boy or girl Avoid celebrity names with controversy - as an example, post-Bill ...


6

TL;DR: No different from single children. There ought to be ample opportunity to address twins individually. They don't (always) do their misdeeds in sync - sometimes only one of them does it, or at least one does it first and the other one follows. Also when you're feeding them, or changing them, or doing any number of similar things - you will inevitably ...


5

Faced with twin boys, we added two criteria to our short list: No alliterative names No rhyming names Beyond that, we wanted Names that weren't too popular No obvious way to tease No duplicates among our friends or friends' kids We ended up with one first name that's in the 200s ranking in the US, and another that sounds familiar to people, but is ...


5

Many countries have laws that govern how surnames are given. Have you checked the laws that apply in your country? To name a few examples I'm familiar with, a child of unmarried parents usually gets the surname of the mother but with a small amount of paperwork the father's surname can be given instead. I'm not sure whether it's even possible to give the ...


4

As others have mentioned, similar sounding names can be confusing. But that doesn't mean you can't have similar/related names. As an example, a friend of mine called John had a sister called Jenny. There is no risk of confusion, but "John and Jenny" sounds good and you get the benefits mentioned by Torben. So instead of similar sounding, I'd rather go for ...


4

I'm in pretty much the same exact situation you are in (except for my son being 7 months old, which does change some aspects pretty significantly). My mother and her husband sent my wife and I lists of names they were considering, and honestly, we hated most of them. I strongly feel that the parents should be the ones coming up with the list of potential ...


4

Adopted children should be treated the same as the rest of the family. I would explain that to them and get their agreement before doing it. It would really help them feel like they joined your family.


4

Here's a list of the aspects that we used: Must be easily pronounceable in the languages we use. (Specifically for us, this means Danish, German, and English.) Must not have special characters like Jürgen or Søren. (This makes it easier to use emails/websites and other international systems.) Must be possible to spell it correctly after hearing it once. ...


4

While it may have used to be a rough indicator of ethnicity, country-of-origin, religion or class, with the Internet age and the 'cult of celebrity', you really cannot tell much about a person from their name. A person's name is one of the most precious things to them, so it is important that it can't be a source of ridicule for the person. Here are some ...


4

I don't think the name that your kids use for him is going to have a major impact on how they view him. If your mom is worried that your kids do not seem to accept him as warmly as their grandpa as she does as her husband, you should probably have a frank talk with her about that issue. If your kids already love him, then chances are that "Mr. Joe" is a ...


4

Because my grandpa and my dad have the same first name as me, I was raised going by my middle name. I was around eight or nine years old before I learned that the name I was going by wasn't my given first name. I went all of the way through school using my middle name as my first name and only started going by my first name in a professional setting five ...


4

How do your parents feel about the surname? Do either of your parents have strong feelings about the family name being passed down? Is your child a boy or girl? I would reach out to the extended family and see what they think. Grandparents tend to get a little crazy about grandkids


4

My wife and I have different surnames. I do not particularly like hyphenated surnames so we chose hers as the surname and mine as a middle name. Our children's names are: <firstname> <secondname> <mysurname> <mywife'ssurname> You almost never have to specify the full set of names; my 6 yo is not even really aware that he has four ...


3

This is a pretty personal question. There isn't any "right" answer. My wife and I didn't want the very popular, trendy names. For example, when I was growing up, there were waaaay too many Jasons. We also didn't want to go for a name that was completely off-the-wall. Therefore, we chose "classic" names that everyone (here in the USA) recognizes as names, ...


3

By adopting a child you are saying that you are taking that child as your own, so you should change the name. Not doing so will segregate the family more and could cause the child to think that they are not a true part of the family.


3

What people call each other reflects their relationship with each other. It neither adds nor takes away from their relationship or their memory of anyone else. It seems like you're the only one who has a problem with it. I can understand that. My mom divorced and remarried when I was over 30. Since I never lived with my stepdad I don't feel like he ...


3

I'd change the names -- in the records, not what you call your sons -- to avoid any legal issues further down the line. If you're in the United States, there actually is no official "legal name change" procedure in most states, and anyone is allowed to change their name to (almost) anything they want, simply by beginning to use the new name. You can read ...


3

The Social Security office maintains a database which can be searched by name, year, gender, ranking... For more obscure names, you can find data here.


3

You and your partner may not feel particularly strongly about this, but depending on where you live, those around you may. They may make some assumptions about you based on this decision or they may not see it as a decision you made but as a symptom of a different route to familyhood. In North America, you would likely see people concluding: 3 different ...


2

I am amazed at all the different advice given on this subject of what to call a step parent or step grand parent. I was a widower who remarried a widow with three daughters. I had three sons, all were grown with children of their own. On my side of the family there was no biological grandmother, on her side there was no biological grandfather. We have been ...


2

I'd propose to choose differently sounding names for siblings and especially for twins, as it can avoid confusion when you want to call one of them. E. g. in our son's playschool there are twins which are called Ozan and Rozan. This is very cute, but IMHO it is confusing for other people (who is who?) and as the names sound extremely similar it is also ...



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