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9

My mom died before my kids were born. My father remarried after my kids were born. We struggle with the question of names too. I think to answer this question you need to first ask yourself how important names/titles really are (some would say it's just a name) and then ask yourself how important the person is and how this name would make them feel. My ...


9

Let each kid decide. I changed my last name when I was ten and my mother remarried. I got to make the decision myself, and I don't think I did the wrong decision. And don't forget to consider the names themselves in the decision. Unusual names have their benefit as you get less mixups, and names should be easy to pronounce in many countries (ie no weird ...


8

Being a twin, I deeply appreciate that my name is distinctly different from my twin's name. Here are some aspects that come to my mind. Choose similar-sounding names if you want these aspects; avoid similar-sounding names if you don't: Pros of similar-sounding names can be easier to say quickly, i.e. they flow naturally from the tongue. emphasize that ...


8

I'm sure that lots of people are called Thomas without being a twin, and they're fine with that. No Thomas I know is a twin1). On the other hand, I am a twin, and neither I nor my brother are named Thomas. Is this meaning the primary reason for your naming concern? To answer your question, what do I think you should do: Either change his name early, or ...


7

I guess if you want to check a single name, then Wolfram Alpha is a good place to start. For the input name patrick you get various stastics regarding rank and fractions a timeline for the fraction estimates of age and number currently living people with this name a plot of the age distribution and of course the most important: celebrities with ...


6

If he behaves like a grampa, I think he deserves to be called grampa. We call my stepfather grandad (even though I call him by his first name). It can be more complicated if the real grandfather also is around and resents sharing the title with the step-granddad. In that case I would let the real grandfather have a veto.


6

TL;DR: No different from single children. There ought to be ample opportunity to address twins individually. They don't (always) do their misdeeds in sync - sometimes only one of them does it, or at least one does it first and the other one follows. Also when you're feeding them, or changing them, or doing any number of similar things - you will inevitably ...


4

Because my grandpa and my dad have the same first name as me, I was raised going by my middle name. I was around eight or nine years old before I learned that the name I was going by wasn't my given first name. I went all of the way through school using my middle name as my first name and only started going by my first name in a professional setting five ...


4

As others have mentioned, similar sounding names can be confusing. But that doesn't mean you can't have similar/related names. As an example, a friend of mine called John had a sister called Jenny. There is no risk of confusion, but "John and Jenny" sounds good and you get the benefits mentioned by Torben. So instead of similar sounding, I'd rather go for ...


4

I don't think the name that your kids use for him is going to have a major impact on how they view him. If your mom is worried that your kids do not seem to accept him as warmly as their grandpa as she does as her husband, you should probably have a frank talk with her about that issue. If your kids already love him, then chances are that "Mr. Joe" is a ...


4

I'm in pretty much the same exact situation you are in (except for my son being 7 months old, which does change some aspects pretty significantly). My mother and her husband sent my wife and I lists of names they were considering, and honestly, we hated most of them. I strongly feel that the parents should be the ones coming up with the list of potential ...


3

What people call each other reflects their relationship with each other. It neither adds nor takes away from their relationship or their memory of anyone else. It seems like you're the only one who has a problem with it. I can understand that. My mom divorced and remarried when I was over 30. Since I never lived with my stepdad I don't feel like he ...


3

The Social Security office maintains a database which can be searched by name, year, gender, ranking... For more obscure names, you can find data here.


3

I'd change the names -- in the records, not what you call your sons -- to avoid any legal issues further down the line. If you're in the United States, there actually is no official "legal name change" procedure in most states, and anyone is allowed to change their name to (almost) anything they want, simply by beginning to use the new name. You can read ...


2

I'd propose to choose differently sounding names for siblings and especially for twins, as it can avoid confusion when you want to call one of them. E. g. in our son's playschool there are twins which are called Ozan and Rozan. This is very cute, but IMHO it is confusing for other people (who is who?) and as the names sound extremely similar it is also ...


1

"name me a baby" is very good for this. You can search for names that "begin with", "end with" or "contain" certain strings and see how popular the resulting names are. If you click on a name you can see a graph showing how the popularity has changed over time. http://www.namemeababy.com/


1

I highly suggest you have a plan to explain your decision to him as he grows older. It's surprising how issues like this can affect people later in life. I grew up being called by my middle name except inside school. The only benefit was that when my friends called me I could tell if they were in school friends or out of school friends. Other than that ...


1

You know, in the moment, you will call them by each-other's names sometimes anyway. I am three years older than my sister yet mom always referred to me with her name and vice-versa if she was upset, in a hurry, etc. My Grandmother even once called me by my Dad's former dog's name. Go with names you really like and don't worry about it being confusing. ...


1

I'm a father myself and if I passed away, I would in no way feel disrespected if my grandchildren started calling their step grandfather "Granpa Joe", especially if he is "absolutely wonderful" with them. On the contrary, I would be happy that they had such a positive figure in their life. However, I don't think you should force the children to call him ...


1

No one will replace your dad. However, in his absence maybe he would be pleased that someone was stepping up to love the people he would love if he were still here? I don't know if that alternative view might help. In our family we have a whole mess of step this and step that, and so names are often more about roles than biology. Perhaps grandpa joe? or ...


1

There are many names for a Grandad. The important thing is that it should be something only the grand-children (or step-grandchildren) use, so it is intimate, personal and endearing. "Mr Joe" isn't ticking those boxes. Can you find something that does (but isn't "Grampa")? Edit: Actually, reading again some of your comments, "Mr Joe" does seem to be the ...


1

For my family, the grandparent title means more about the role they play in our kids lives than genetics, so my kids' step-grandparents are 'Granddad' and 'Nanny'. (not criticising you for feeling differently btw, just thought you might like to hear a different pov!) That said, with the two step-grandparents, four biological grandparents and five ...



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