Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

The key to getting a reluctant practiser to practise anything (a musical instrument, reading, physical exercise, whatever) is to change from: Time for you to go practise X! to OK, time for us to do your X! I don't mean stand over him with a timer and glare to ensure he doesn't stop at 9 minutes 30 seconds. I mean you show your enthusiasm for the ...


18

You might consider starting with clapping games, like pat-a-cake. These games are effective because you know when you are out of synch because of your partner. Success is being able to play the game smoothly. The speed can be increased to make it more challenging. I started teaching my kids by having them press the back of my hands as I was clapping. To ...


14

When is it OK to introduce non-children's music? Immediately. Seriously, there is absolutely no reason to "ease" your kids into music gradually. We started our son our with everything from John Williams, to Frank Sinatra, to The Ramones, starting before he was born and continuing right up to today (he's three). We mixed in children's music (for ...


11

Insisting, forcing him to do something will most likely not work in the long term. Yes, he may improve, but it'd be much much better if he wanted to improve. You should talk to your son, ask him whether he wants to learn to play well or not. If he doesn't - I think you shouldn't force him. I admit that he will eventually learn, but it'll cost him much and ...


10

I would get him to play more on days when he is does not have sport or late finishes, and get him just to do a couple of scales or something on days when he has more on. As he starts playing for longer he'll also start enjoying it more as he'll start becoming more creative.


10

Without exception, every adult I know who took piano as a kid but no longer plays, including some who were quite talented, had it turned into a chore by their parents. It is absolutely essential to find a way to keep it fun. So I would make your busiest days fun days, where you still expect him to play, but let him play whatever he wants. It might ...


9

"Too early" depends very much on the child. My wife started banging on the family piano when she was five, until her mother finally convinced a teacher to give her lessons (normally the teacher did not give lessons to children under 6). Since she had an active interest that she expressed without prompting from her parents, I'd say that 5 was not too early ...


8

As another answerer already mentioned of course, decibel level is of concern - you don't want your kids listening to music that is so loud, you will actually hurt their hearing. Outside of that, as shared by this poster some studies on music and toddlers have shown that there can be some impact on intelligence, while still others seem to indicate that is a ...


7

Your child may have good rhythm but lack the motor skills to express it by clapping or bouncing in exact time to the beat. I'd suggest not only the suggestions above, which focus on musical development, but also activities that encourage motor development in general. This page talks about motor development and gives some suggestions on activities. Beyond ...


7

Any music you enjoy listening to, that you plan to play after the baby is born would be appropriate. Human voices are best for learning speech processing. Newborns can recognize the voices of people whom they heard speaking before birth. Normal sounds, including mother's heart beat, walking, and parents' voices are appropriate for development. Some would ...


6

Rhythm is the outcome of synchronized movements. Therefore, rhythm emerges as the body's movements become more refined. Any opportunity for a child to integrate timing of motor movement with balance and motor responses support the development of rhythm. Bouncing on a ball, swinging in a parents arms, clapping hands, swinging arms, stomping feet, beating ...


6

What kind of practice are you trying? One of the key components of techniques like the Suzuki method is to have one parent sit down with the child during practice sessions. The point is that the child will want to do it if the parent shows some interest in the child's activity. If you just tell then to practice, turn on an egg timer, and then walk away ...


6

Toddlers and pre-schoolers do not have terribly long attention spans, generally speaking. 21 minutes (roughly the time of a half-hour show, minus commercial breaks) can be a long time for a kid to sit and follow uninterrupted dialog. In order to appeal to parents, shows targeting that age range will frequently try to work some sort of "edutainment" ...


6

As an adult who does the same thing, I don't think it's anything to worry about. If they aren't already involved in playing a musical instrument or some type of singing outlet you could find a local option to help them get the music out. I know in my case it's that I really love music and find myself thinking about songs I enjoy or sometimes am noodling a ...


6

Yes, it's okay. If it's any consolation, the subject matter doesn't register with your daughter -- yet! But this will soon change, so you're right to address it ahead of that time. Becoming parents means learning how to raise a well-rounded kid, but it also means learning which of your old habits to let go of -- at least for a couple of years. There are ...


6

Even some of the MCs known for their notorious lyrics don't feel that they are suitable for children's ears. To quote Willie D of the Ghetto Boys (censored a bit): Interviewer: Well that’s strange to hear coming from the guy who wrote “Let a Hoe Be a Hoe.” Those songs were extremely explicit and you’re worried about the late night porn on the TV? ...


6

I'm going to add a little contrast to the other answers. I think you should insist, but carefully. Focus on having your son set goals, encouraging your son / being there for him, setting a routine, and possibly finding a better teacher. I have been playing the piano for more than 10 years, and I never would have made it this far if my parents did not ...


5

No bribes! If you reward your kids for an activity then the activity becomes an obstacle, something to be overcome to get what they want. By definition an obstacle is something to be overcome, avoided, etc. My son, also 8, just started piano lessons. He asked for them which helps, but he has to practice every day for 10 minutes. We're not too strict on ...


5

I can't follow the story. :-) The main problem though is sitting still and keeping quiet. Once the child can do that for as long as required, it should be fine. For other kids some concert halls actually have concerts for children, which basically means popular classical music (and sometimes the good bits from operas) where kids are allowed to jump in the ...


5

My 7 year old was recently diagnosed with ADD and this was actually a question on his assessment and yes, he hums all the time! He has done this since he could talk and honestly, it drives me up the wall but according to his psychiatrist, it is a way for kids with ADD to keep themselves "busy" and they really do not even realize they are doing it.


5

You could ask him what he wants. Ask him if he wants to pratice a bit for getting good progress, or if he is too tired.


5

At the early stages holding a childs interest is far more important than practicing. the child must want to learn and forcing practice would make it a chore rather than a good time and you could stifle the childs own natural gifts. When i was taking lessons I did not want to show up for lessons if i had not practised for fear the teacher would look down on ...


5

When I was a boy of about 11, I decided I wanted to learn to play the piano. My parents didn't really care one way or the other, but they were pleased that I took an interest in something other than video games. They found a piano teacher who was also a relatively young elementary school teacher. I looked up to her like she was some kind of goddess, and ...


4

Teaching rhythm with a complicated instrument like a piano might be difficult. Get a cheap set of play drums of different sizes that can be played with either a stick or with your hands. These are fun for children just to make noise and play, but you can also sit and play games. Any game you play with drums involves rhythm at some level, and you can ...


4

I think first and foremost you should concentrate on exposing your child to a wide variety of music, and encouraging her to explore what types of musics she enjoys. It's never too early to start with music. Participation is more important than skill, by the way. Even if (like myself) you have little-to-no talent for singing, sing to, and with, your ...


4

Encouraging your child musically is great! Since she's so young, now is a great time to help her understand such inherently basic concepts as rhythm and pitch. Clapping her hands in time to singing or music on the radio, clapping her feet together when you change her diaper (my kids LOVED this when they were little), or patting her back in rhythm when ...


4

My focus with all of our kids was to ensure they are exposed to all genres of music, so we play classical, heavy metal, blues, country, jazz, etc. Aside from avoiding peak volumes that can be too high, play them everything, so they hopefully appreciate everything.


4

I am the OP. I eventually used a bribe. One M&M lentil (or skittle) per song (page). In the first 4 months it worked. Later my child stopped requiring the reward and now can practice without the reward and loves the piano. So initial struggle was not worth it. You can bribe and fade it away later.


4

You would have to qualify the definition of normal to get an appropriate answer but I'll go ahead and assume you are asking based on the majority of other children. I would say this is normal. I used to hum all the time. Sometimes I would sing too, but mostly hum but then I started playing guitar. While sometimes I still hum, when I am feeling "musical" I ...


3

My 8yo is a budding opera geek... has been for at least a year and a half. His favorites are The Phantom of the Opera and the first half of Les Miserables. I think what both of those have in common are that the stories are very accessible to children: Phantom is a ghost story, pretty straightforward; Les Mis (the first half, anyway) is about a little girl ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible