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17

You might consider starting with clapping games, like pat-a-cake. These games are effective because you know when you are out of synch because of your partner. Success is being able to play the game smoothly. The speed can be increased to make it more challenging. I started teaching my kids by having them press the back of my hands as I was clapping. To ...


7

Any music you enjoy listening to, that you plan to play after the baby is born would be appropriate. Human voices are best for learning speech processing. Newborns can recognize the voices of people whom they heard speaking before birth. Normal sounds, including mother's heart beat, walking, and parents' voices are appropriate for development. Some would ...


7

Your child may have good rhythm but lack the motor skills to express it by clapping or bouncing in exact time to the beat. I'd suggest not only the suggestions above, which focus on musical development, but also activities that encourage motor development in general. This page talks about motor development and gives some suggestions on activities. Beyond ...


7

"Too early" depends very much on the child. My wife started banging on the family piano when she was five, until her mother finally convinced a teacher to give her lessons (normally the teacher did not give lessons to children under 6). Since she had an active interest that she expressed without prompting from her parents, I'd say that 5 was not too early ...


7

As another answerer already mentioned of course, decibel level is of concern - you don't want your kids listening to music that is so loud, you will actually hurt their hearing. Outside of that, as shared by this poster some studies on music and toddlers have shown that there can be some impact on intelligence, while still others seem to indicate that is a ...


6

Rhythm is the outcome of synchronized movements. Therefore, rhythm emerges as the body's movements become more refined. Any opportunity for a child to integrate timing of motor movement with balance and motor responses support the development of rhythm. Bouncing on a ball, swinging in a parents arms, clapping hands, swinging arms, stomping feet, beating ...


5

What kind of practice are you trying? One of the key components of techniques like the Suzuki method is to have one parent sit down with the child during practice sessions. The point is that the child will want to do it if the parent shows some interest in the child's activity. If you just tell then to practice, turn on an egg timer, and then walk away ...


5

I can't follow the story. :-) The main problem though is sitting still and keeping quiet. Once the child can do that for as long as required, it should be fine. For other kids some concert halls actually have concerts for children, which basically means popular classical music (and sometimes the good bits from operas) where kids are allowed to jump in the ...


4

Teaching rhythm with a complicated instrument like a piano might be difficult. Get a cheap set of play drums of different sizes that can be played with either a stick or with your hands. These are fun for children just to make noise and play, but you can also sit and play games. Any game you play with drums involves rhythm at some level, and you can ...


4

I think first and foremost you should concentrate on exposing your child to a wide variety of music, and encouraging her to explore what types of musics she enjoys. It's never too early to start with music. Participation is more important than skill, by the way. Even if (like myself) you have little-to-no talent for singing, sing to, and with, your ...


4

No bribes! If you reward your kids for an activity then the activity becomes an obstacle, something to be overcome to get what they want. By definition an obstacle is something to be overcome, avoided, etc. My son, also 8, just started piano lessons. He asked for them which helps, but he has to practice every day for 10 minutes. We're not too strict on ...


4

Encouraging your child musically is great! Since she's so young, now is a great time to help her understand such inherently basic concepts as rhythm and pitch. Clapping her hands in time to singing or music on the radio, clapping her feet together when you change her diaper (my kids LOVED this when they were little), or patting her back in rhythm when ...


3

Based on what I've read (mostly a long time ago), it is good for baby to be hearing classical music in particular throughout gestation and into infant-hood based on anecdotal evidence. While, admittedly, scientists can't really agree on what is going on, and scientific studies are inconclusive, there is general agreement that classical music has a ...


3

I am the OP. I eventually used a bribe. One M&M lentil (or skittle) per song (page). In the first 4 months it worked. Later my child stopped requiring the reward and now can practice without the reward and loves the piano. So initial struggle was not worth it. You can bribe and fade it away later.


3

My 8yo is a budding opera geek... has been for at least a year and a half. His favorites are The Phantom of the Opera and the first half of Les Miserables. I think what both of those have in common are that the stories are very accessible to children: Phantom is a ghost story, pretty straightforward; Les Mis (the first half, anyway) is about a little girl ...


3

Definitely get them to at least try - music is such a valuable talent to encourage! Don't worry too much about pressure. Conversely, any child will go through phases of disliking (or saying they dislike) a particular hobby. It may be that you will have to keep a certain amount of 'pressure' to get them through this. You don't want to overdo it, but it may ...


3

As a parent of a similar-aged child, I'm not sure that I agree with your criteria. Other than keeping the decible level at a safe level for infant hearing, which I believe is around 60 dB, I'm not sure what the issue would be with dramatic music. We keep our local classical station on regularly and while my child is fairly sensitive to loud noises she has ...


3

I don't know whether you can encourage aptitude, as this is built in, but you can encourage interest. Here are some suggestions: Buy the child a couple of different instruments. Have no expectations, except for noise. Play "band" with your child, where you play along with her in a little band, ideally guided by her. Encourage the child to sing and sing ...


2

An iPad + Garageband could be a superb way to start learning music and rythm in a playful manner. I might say this because I so immensely love this app myself but, hey, it's good if a parent can have fun too right? :-)


2

Clapping Games are a great way to start, simply clap a rhythm and see if she can repeat it. However, she is only one. You might simply try playing games with her dancing to the music to just get a sense of fast and slow. Can she identify these terms? Then also identifying soft and loud and finally, high and low sounds. As she grows older, rhythm will ...


2

When we wanted our child to take lessons, we took some time for preparation. When he was about 3 and a half years old, we told him that he cannot start learning an instrument before the age of 4. Of course it didn't matter at first. But After telling it over and over (carefully dosed, of course) it became one of the best things about his 4th birthday. He ...


2

As someone you started Piano at 5 and took lessons on and off for 8 years, I would have to ask if the child wants to continue the piano. Without knowing how mature your child is, or what she may have committed to before hand, I would suggest that piano is either 1) Not suited to her attention span, which should be managed, first 2) Not as much fun as she ...


2

There doesn't appear to be any evidence to support the idea that there is any concrete long-term benefit for playing music to babies still in the womb. There does appear to be a short-term improvement for specific spatial tasks found after listening to some classical music pieces (the so-called Mozart Effect), but the studies that introduced us to the idea ...


2

My 2 year old son likes to listen to Pink Floyd. At least it is the only band/genre/etc that he can listen to without doing anything else - just staying in place and listening. I've tried playing him a variety of music, mainly based on my opinion of which music is good and which is not. I've tried playing lots of different old stuff - from rock'n'roll to ...


1

I've heard all the same suggestions about listening to music and types of music and whatnot, and think it's all a bunch of bunk. Maybe it has some deterministic effect, but even if it does I think it's minor. The baby's ears are hardly developed, and even if they were they'd be listening through inches of flesh. They aren't going to "hear" much; maybe ...


1

No bribes too. I endorse what Brian says and add - make the practice one of the first things they do when they walk in door before anything else can distract them. If any bribe - get an after school snack - apples or something cut up and ready for them as soon as they're finished. They're usually famished and would even eat broccoli at that point!


1

To answer the question, I think piano or vocal lessons when they reach an appropriate age (4-5) is not out of the question. I started my now 18 yo on piano lessons when he was 4. However, that being said, I question the motivation of steering a child towards a goal of yours, as opposed to giving them the tools with which they can make their own decisions. ...


1

It is never too early to start singing songs, including the ABCs to your child. In terms of letter recognition and the like, that will come naturally. Read books to your child, even at that early age, sing to them, play with them, enjoy them. More important at this age is a sense of well being and therefore interaction with you, if you choose to use ...


1

By exposing your child to a range of rich musical experiences right from the start you increase the liklihood that your child will be interested in the language of music when the time comes. The solfege method has already been mentioned (Sound of Music, do re mi . . .) and stick notation for rythm can both be introduced around the age of five pretty easily, ...


1

Take a look at Daniel Levitin's book This is your Brain on Music. It's a great read about how your brain processes and responds to music. There's a part of the brain that actually will activate and respond/mimics the dynamics of the music...If you were to graph the response, it would probably look like some of the music visualizations that you see out there. ...



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