Hot answers tagged

68

As rumtscho commented, how do you know the child has no talent? And how do you know they won't end up selling a million records? Take the Sex Pistols as an example - when they started they couldn't play or sing and sounded awful, but were incredibly enthusiastic and became stars. Everyone starts off sounding like they are strangling a cat, or destroying the ...


33

I wouldn't discourage following musical talent. Although he may never be good, it may be a good release when he needs to think. Thomas Jefferson was not amazing but often played the violin when he needed to think things through. We tend to gravitate toward things at which our personalities excel. You could always have him look at other things he may enjoy ...


29

The child is 9 years old. It isn't exactly urgent that you either squash his creative ambitions or support them at the expense of every other possibility. Why not just be supportive? I don't remember when I hit my stride, but it was well into adulthood, and even then, my parents still didn't really understand my style or what I was doing, and they would ...


27

The key to getting a reluctant practiser to practise anything (a musical instrument, reading, physical exercise, whatever) is to change from: Time for you to go practise X! to OK, time for us to do your X! I don't mean stand over him with a timer and glare to ensure he doesn't stop at 9 minutes 30 seconds. I mean you show your enthusiasm for the ...


19

You might consider starting with clapping games, like pat-a-cake. These games are effective because you know when you are out of synch because of your partner. Success is being able to play the game smoothly. The speed can be increased to make it more challenging. I started teaching my kids by having them press the back of my hands as I was clapping. To ...


14

When is it OK to introduce non-children's music? Immediately. Seriously, there is absolutely no reason to "ease" your kids into music gradually. We started our son our with everything from John Williams, to Frank Sinatra, to The Ramones, starting before he was born and continuing right up to today (he's three). We mixed in children's music (for example,...


13

Insisting, forcing him to do something will most likely not work in the long term. Yes, he may improve, but it'd be much much better if he wanted to improve. You should talk to your son, ask him whether he wants to learn to play well or not. If he doesn't - I think you shouldn't force him. I admit that he will eventually learn, but it'll cost him much and ...


12

Basically it's all marketing wearing a lab coat. Nothing in the research supports a 'Mozart effect'. The original research used to support the 'Mozart effect' is Music and spatial task performance (Rauscher et al.) which demonstrated a performance improvement:- lasting 10-15 minutes in adults for specific types of spatial-temporal tests general ...


12

With formal training and time (and maybe earplugs for you) everyone improves. My son played for many years with more enthusiasm about sharing the experience of creating music than putting in the time to be very good. His music teacher gave him an award for being "most enthusiastic" student because it was clear to all he really enjoyed it. He moved on from ...


12

Talent ≠ skill. While a talent is innate, a skill is learned and developed. Talent can definitely give you a jumpstart on the road to success, but it's only through developing skill that you'll ever achieve it. Remember that regardless of talent, everyone begins their journey with no skill.


11

Without exception, every adult I know who took piano as a kid but no longer plays, including some who were quite talented, had it turned into a chore by their parents. It is absolutely essential to find a way to keep it fun. So I would make your busiest days fun days, where you still expect him to play, but let him play whatever he wants. It might ...


10

I would get him to play more on days when he is does not have sport or late finishes, and get him just to do a couple of scales or something on days when he has more on. As he starts playing for longer he'll also start enjoying it more as he'll start becoming more creative.


10

Be glad your kid is enthusiastic about something which does not involve a computer monitor and beeping! I suffered greatly when my son learned drums, but it broke my heart when he gave everything up for World of Brainless Beepcraft. It is useful for any child to learn the discipline and self-discipline of music. The wonder of knowing how the dots turn into ...


9

"Too early" depends very much on the child. My wife started banging on the family piano when she was five, until her mother finally convinced a teacher to give her lessons (normally the teacher did not give lessons to children under 6). Since she had an active interest that she expressed without prompting from her parents, I'd say that 5 was not too early ...


8

Any music you enjoy listening to, that you plan to play after the baby is born would be appropriate. Human voices are best for learning speech processing. Newborns can recognize the voices of people whom they heard speaking before birth. Normal sounds, including mother's heart beat, walking, and parents' voices are appropriate for development. Some would ...


8

As another answerer already mentioned of course, decibel level is of concern - you don't want your kids listening to music that is so loud, you will actually hurt their hearing. Outside of that, as shared by this poster some studies on music and toddlers have shown that there can be some impact on intelligence, while still others seem to indicate that is a ...


8

As an adult who does the same thing, I don't think it's anything to worry about. If they aren't already involved in playing a musical instrument or some type of singing outlet you could find a local option to help them get the music out. I know in my case it's that I really love music and find myself thinking about songs I enjoy or sometimes am noodling a ...


7

Your child may have good rhythm but lack the motor skills to express it by clapping or bouncing in exact time to the beat. I'd suggest not only the suggestions above, which focus on musical development, but also activities that encourage motor development in general. This page talks about motor development and gives some suggestions on activities. Beyond ...


7

Yes, it's okay. If it's any consolation, the subject matter doesn't register with your daughter -- yet! But this will soon change, so you're right to address it ahead of that time. Becoming parents means learning how to raise a well-rounded kid, but it also means learning which of your old habits to let go of -- at least for a couple of years. There are ...


7

I think lots of people want to be musicians for reasons that have less to do with the music than with being the centre of attention in a specific way. So it should be relatively easy to transfer it to something else once the child gains recognition for successes there. However, if the child is still young, then as a parent I would try to make sure not to ...


7

Music helps in areas of math and analytical thinking. Give the kid time, some lessons, and i think you will come to realize that it was a great gift. Never discourage a young mind from creativity and interest. Never tell them what you wrote here. Instead you could complement them on their interest. Yes it is hard on the ears but most all musicians start off ...


6

Rhythm is the outcome of synchronized movements. Therefore, rhythm emerges as the body's movements become more refined. Any opportunity for a child to integrate timing of motor movement with balance and motor responses support the development of rhythm. Bouncing on a ball, swinging in a parents arms, clapping hands, swinging arms, stomping feet, beating ...


6

What kind of practice are you trying? One of the key components of techniques like the Suzuki method is to have one parent sit down with the child during practice sessions. The point is that the child will want to do it if the parent shows some interest in the child's activity. If you just tell then to practice, turn on an egg timer, and then walk away (...


6

My 7 year old was recently diagnosed with ADD and this was actually a question on his assessment and yes, he hums all the time! He has done this since he could talk and honestly, it drives me up the wall but according to his psychiatrist, it is a way for kids with ADD to keep themselves "busy" and they really do not even realize they are doing it.


6

Even some of the MCs known for their notorious lyrics don't feel that they are suitable for children's ears. To quote Willie D of the Ghetto Boys (censored a bit): Interviewer: Well that’s strange to hear coming from the guy who wrote “Let a Hoe Be a Hoe.” Those songs were extremely explicit and you’re worried about the late night porn on the TV? ...


6

Toddlers and pre-schoolers do not have terribly long attention spans, generally speaking. 21 minutes (roughly the time of a half-hour show, minus commercial breaks) can be a long time for a kid to sit and follow uninterrupted dialog. In order to appeal to parents, shows targeting that age range will frequently try to work some sort of "edutainment" (...


6

I'm going to add a little contrast to the other answers. I think you should insist, but carefully. Focus on having your son set goals, encouraging your son / being there for him, setting a routine, and possibly finding a better teacher. I have been playing the piano for more than 10 years, and I never would have made it this far if my parents did not "force"...


5

No bribes! If you reward your kids for an activity then the activity becomes an obstacle, something to be overcome to get what they want. By definition an obstacle is something to be overcome, avoided, etc. My son, also 8, just started piano lessons. He asked for them which helps, but he has to practice every day for 10 minutes. We're not too strict on ...


5

I can't follow the story. :-) The main problem though is sitting still and keeping quiet. Once the child can do that for as long as required, it should be fine. For other kids some concert halls actually have concerts for children, which basically means popular classical music (and sometimes the good bits from operas) where kids are allowed to jump in the ...


5

You would have to qualify the definition of normal to get an appropriate answer but I'll go ahead and assume you are asking based on the majority of other children. I would say this is normal. I used to hum all the time. Sometimes I would sing too, but mostly hum but then I started playing guitar. While sometimes I still hum, when I am feeling "musical" I ...



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