Hot answers tagged

13

TL; DR: We've been through the same thing, and we tried to explain to my daughter what was going to happen ahead of time, without hiding anything. Overall, it was a painless process, and after a month in the new flat, she seems to have adapted to her new environment. We went through exactly the same situation a few months ago with my 2.5 year old daughter. ...


10

From my own experience moving 6 times as a child, and talking to others about their childhood moves, I would say the earlier you relocate, the better. Socially, in general other children are less accepting of outsiders the older they get. This is especially true if you're moving somewhere with a visibly different culture or accent. My wife moved from ...


8

I cannot offer research-based hard facts, but I can offer you my personal experience: I've moved 16 times in my life, between 5 countries, at varying ages. (My father was a valued specialist at the time.) My bullet #2 would be most appropriate to you, but I'll list other ages for reference. In summary, I would recommend that you move sooner rather than ...


7

(by popular request) Look for English-speaking ex-pats in the area you're moving back to, especially ones with small children...


7

Both are valid options, but reading your post carefully I'd suggest finishing the school year at the old school. A list of pro's (in somewhat random order): Finishing at his old school should give him some sense of closure - this phase ends for all the current kids next summer. So I can understand that he doesn't want to leave prematurely but (perhaps ...


5

Children at that age love to play, and they will play together even if the don't speak the same language. Where I live the community here is so mixed that most children are English as a second language. Just focus on teaching her the ABCs and 123s in German. In kindergarten they focus mostly on the foundations of reading and counting. If she learns that ...


5

Moving to a new house and changing the daycare are big changes, a new bed is a small change. Potty training can be either, as is so often the case, it depends... I see three separate issues here: Can you separate the daycare switch from the moving? If you can, you definitely should consider making them two distinct events, IMO Moving means a new room and ...


4

I think you should let them watch some english Children's TV programs with CLOSE CAPTIONS turned on, and talk English a little bit at home with them, so they know "English is a fun game we play with mom and dad" as well, that German is their primary language. As a person who grew up in an all English household, and who learned German in high-school, but ...


4

It seems you need to find and talk to someone that meets the following criteria. Someone very familiar with the area you're considering moving to (current and long-time resident perhaps). Someone who shares your values. Someone who understands your needs and desires. With our recent move, we also needed to make some important decisions. We happen to be ...


4

We also went through it with our kids, several times. Our first international move, from the U.S. to Peru, was when our oldest was 3.5 and our second had just turned 2. Then we moved from Peru back to the U.S. four years later, with a third child who'd been born in Peru and was just shy of 2 years old at the time of the move. In the 11 years since, we've ...


3

What steps can I take to help her make new friends once we move? Try to register her at a sports club and/or music school (something like that).This helps deflecting the old friends (as a 6 year) and then she should find new friends (mostly) at her age, very soon...


3

I agree with Matthew...integrate the German into her life as much as you can. Once you get settled, then perhaps you can find a part-time daycare-type situation that will expose her to native speakers. Here in the US, we have mothers-day-out programs in a lot of areas which are only a couple of days a week in most cases for maybe 4 hours each day. The ...


3

Babies have been doing this since the beginning of time. They are flexible little beings, and any discomfort will likely be minor and short-lived. But if you are concerned, keep a burp cloth (cloth diaper or nappy) over your shoulder whenever you hold him. It protects your clothes as well!!


3

Two things: Ask your colleagues, neighbours, or people on local forums about schools; Go to school, talk to teachers,to a director, look around inside.


3

Doing everything at once gets it over with in one go, but at the risk that it won't go very well. I would changing one element at a time. Toddlers are a bit like people with autism; they like fixed patterns and repetition, any change can be upsetting. Especially when you're facing big changes, tread lightly. I can't really say "do one change every two ...


3

Of course, as already said, the earlier the better. Later on, it would be wise to coordinate that with the moment that the child would change school anyway (like going from elementary to middle school, or from middle to high school).


3

I second the other answers suggestion of looking for expats. A few notes: Your kids will forget a second (even first language) if it is not reinforced. They learn language (and other behaviours) to talk to their peers even more than their parents. This means that there is very little you can do directly but also that you can be very effective by ...


3

I was in the same situation as yourself. One daughter finishing grade 6 before moving to middle school, the other in grade four. The move was occasioned by a messy divorce and financial downsizing, so everyone was rattled. I kept the girls at the old school to finish the year, so there would be some continuity. The following year, the older went to middle ...


2

Another option is online communities. There are many parental/school-related local communities on FaceBook/G+ etc... (I know our locality - which is a small town - has a couple, some very specifically centered around specific shared-value communities). You can try searching community names for "locale+school" or "locale+parents" or "locale+families" Find ...


2

Check out age appropriate language courses, here is one example I found in my hometown Hamburg. Only one hour per week should be plenty to keep your child from forgetting what it has already learned. Just be careful to avoid groups that try to hammer as much knowledge into your child's brain while it is still too young to defend itself, they seem to be very ...


2

Your preschooler will probably have very little problem with the move in comparison with the adjustment to the new baby. Be sure her room is the first you unpack so her bed and the like are set up for her on the first night. Take a tour of the house when you first arrive, talking about all the great things she will be doing in each room. Make a REALLY big ...


2

I live in Georgia right now. We've been here for about 1 year. The native language is Georgian and most people (adults at least) also speak Russian. Our youngest child (age 2) understands as much Russian and Georgian as she does English (mostly due to baby sitters and playgroups), and she hasn't taken classes in any language. I've been studying Georgian for ...


2

We moved with 3 kids age 0.5, 2.5 & 3.5 to a different country and it was no problem whatsoever. We were lucky enough to find a pre-school that was specifically designed for non-native speakers and worked quite well. Within 6 month or so the two older ones could communicate effortlessly and within a year there were indistinguishable from native speakers. ...


2

First of all, I love the fact that I get to tell one of the forum mods "YOR DOIN IT RONG!!!11" IMO wait till the move. If it's planned and it's in the pretty near future (couple months), there's no reason not to wait. Every routine you have is going to be restarted anyway, and you'll even have to start some new ones. Regardless of how you try to plan it, ...


2

I think you will find the month by month outline on American Pregnancy Helpful because it goes over the major developments you can expect in a very clear and precise way for the first year. The list includes motor skills as well as others (such as social) but since the most noticeable and "measured" developments that occur during the first year are ...


2

Both options seem equally good from your description. Have you considered other downsides of the move, such as trying to make friends there? At middle school there will be lots of other kids trying to make friends, but a year before the end of this school may be difficult to become part of established groups. There is no right answer, at the end of the day ...


2

We did this some years ago. As far as our son was concerned it was all an excellent adventure. He was too young to be sad about losing friends, and the airplane and airport were exciting and interesting. If you are flying then read the fine print on luggage allowances carefully. We were able to bring a full size suitcase and hand baggage as "his" luggage, ...


1

Have you considered co sleeping? This way you dont have to worry about A hurting your younger baby B. Once your younger kid attains 3 years of age, you can shift him.in the same bedroom of A. So this way, they will have a playroom and a bedroom.


1

A lot of parenting at this age comes from just making your best call and teaching the child the "way it is" for them. If you look around the world, kids just learn to adapt to whatever, from the richest mansion to the poorest village -- what they are given is what is normal. It is your job to choose what is best for them. I wouldn't worry about it. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible