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32

Common Sense Media is an incredible resource for this purpose. It provides parent-focused overviews and specific details about scenes that contain both desirable and undesirable activity. Movies are rated for age appropriateness and in each of the following categories: Desirable Educational value Messages Role Models Undesirable Violence / scariness ...


31

In my experience, people see what they want to see in movies. For example, there was a brouhaha about Frozen promoting a gay agenda. If you actually examine the plots, the messages of princess movies are overwhelmingly that wealth and good looks are not enough. Snow White and the witch were both very beautiful, but one was vain and one was modest and ...


28

I agree that there may be an issue here - ie, some Disney movies perpetuate gender stereotypes, gender roles, and other things that aren't good things to perpetuate. However, I feel like this is similar to the censorship debate, in that simply not letting your kid watch them is not the right answer. Your kid will be exposed to similar issues whether or not ...


13

I think it comes down to good 'ole fashioned parental gut feeling. You know your kid. Watch the movie in question beforehand and then judge whether you think it's appropriate for whatever stage your kid is currently in. Some kids are obviously more sensitive to certain things so you just have to be cognizant of what might be scary for him/her. I'd also ...


7

While you should definitely vet the content of movies you let your child watch, Disney movies are perhaps the least problematic in this regard. Let's look at a few Disney movies with these Princess characters. I'm going to limit it to the previous century to avoid an incredibly unweildy list problem. Snow White Here right off the bat we do have a ...


7

The BBFC (British Board of Film Classification) has an extremely good reputation for rating movies, and then explaining WHY a movie is so rated. They're the ones responsible for the legal rating of British films, but the key advantage for a parent such as yourself is that they generally include WHY they made that decision, and a thorough list of all the ...


7

I have recommended Common Sense Media in response to a similar question about movies, and it turns out that they provide similarly high quality reviews for the following media: Movies Games Apps Websites TV Books Music They have rankings for age appropriateness, as well for rankings and explanations for specific categories that parents are likely ...


6

It really depends entirely on the child. As for: what to do if they are bored after 5 minutes Leave. Be prepared to NOT make it through the entire film and be OK leaving early if need be. That takes a lot of stress out of the whole process.


6

As you mentioned in a previous question, attention span is likely to be the limiting factor. It's not common for children that age to be able to sit through entire movies. In addition, there is no evidence that any television, regardless of the content, provides any benefit on children under the age of 2. So at the most basic, no, your 18 month old son is ...


4

The American Academy of Pediatrician's policy statement addresses this very issue. You can read it in full here. In fact, 2 studies have found that watching a program such as “Sesame Street” has a negative effect on language for children younger than 2 years, and 2 studies have found no evidence of benefit....Children 12 to 18 months of age ...


3

An important consideration to make is WHY you are showing a movie. At that young age, most of what you do with the child should be intentional. If you think it has a message that you want to convey to your child, or if it is a subject that your child enjoys (and is age-appropriate), then by all means. However, if it's for your own pleasure or because ...


3

The BBFC (British Board of Film Classification) has an extremely good reputation for rating movies, and then explaining WHY a movie is so rated. They're the ones responsible for the legal rating of British films, and their ratings are like this. U(c): Universally Acceptable but aimed for a very young audience. U: Universally Acceptable PG: Acceptable, but ...


3

My kids all did fine from about the age of 3. The only real way to know which movie to pick is by seeing what they like at home. My kids all have wildly different taste in movies, so usually I take them one at a time. Sometimes they get bored during exposition, but just require a quiet reminder from me. You can't really judge it by how much they sit ...


2

I saw Fantasia at around 4 or 5. Can't remember that exact age, but I still remember seeing it. If all you're looking for is that your child "sits quietly", my kids sat quietly through a movie at 2 and 3. if you want a "take home" value I think 4 or 5 is a good age.


2

This varies so much from child to child I'm not sure their is a useful answer other than just to try them. In a worst case you will have wasted a few pounds/dollars/euro etc and have to leave early. My eldest enjoyed films from about 4, but my middle daughter was not a fan until she was about 6. I remember taking her about her fifth birthday and she ...


1

What age can you expect a child to happily sit through a movie It depends on how much media consumption they've been trained to handle. My 3½ year old watches about five minutes of TV per day, just one episode of Barbapapa before bed. He wouldn't last long in a cinema. On the other hand, some pre-schoolers spend between one and three hours per day in ...


1

I use general review sites for judging if the game is appropriate for my son or not. Every popular review site I know (metacritic, imdb, boardgamegeek, amazon, etc.) contains information about genre, PG rating, basic description, screenshots (or photos) and so on. This general information normally gives me enough data to decide if the game is appropriate. ...


1

I actually watch the movie first, or read the preview of the story, so I will get an idea whether it is appropriate for my child or not. I have to screen it first, so I would know if my son will get good values out of it. Sometimes, I also ask for recommendations coming from a friend or relative who already watch the movie. I also watch with my 1 year and ...


1

(Copy from my answer to the Star Wars q) IMDB lists the age certifications a movie has received in many countries. This can act as a good guidance about movies you haven't seen. Here is the ones for Star Wars: Iceland:L (special edition) / Iceland:LH (original version) (video re-rating) / Malaysia:U / Canada:G (British Columbia/Quebec) / South Korea:All / ...


1

Netflix has a good breakdown of most modern movies in terms of how appropriate their content is for children. It will give you details about what potentially objectionable content is in a movie, give recommendations of what age level it is appropriate for, and give you child-appropriate discussion topics based on the content of the movie. I believe you ...


1

I frequently use Plugged In Online. It is funded by Focus on the Family, and I've found it to be honest and fair in its assessment of films. Their reviews come from a conservative POV, but they don't slander one group or another.


1

Use the rating as a general guide, but sit with your child through the film and if there are scary bits let them cuddle into you for reassurance. At that age you should be the safest thing in their world, and showing you enjoy a film can help them enjoy without being scared. A large part of making the decision will also come down to how mature your child is ...


1

All wonderful answers so far.IMDB also has a useable parental guide to films.



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