Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Different kids are motivated by different things. You say he is not motivated by rewards, well what have you tried? You have certain things that you need him to do. My eldest really likes money. My middle child: iPad time and stickers. My youngest: sweets on Friday. There are lots of different reward schemes you might try. I know someone who has a monkey ...


1

Hmm, help her out with the baby. If she needs a little break ,be there to assist with the babies needs. and that may mean that you take baby for walk, change diapers, or even give baby a bath, while mom takes it easy. You may be a starting mister mom with this, but in your wives eyes, she will regard you as an angel dear for helping her. Besides, all moms ...


-3

Music lessons and children often don't seem to mix, especially when it's practice time. It's really the same as anything else in family life, really. Children follow parental examples, and it's no different in music or any other art form requiring years of cultivation. Parents who wish for their children to become athletes are usually sports enthusiasts ...


1

Perhaps your son would be more productive in his practice if you were actively involved, as parents are in the Suzuki method. There is a nice book about how to be a parent practice coach -- http://www.carriereuning.com/soundcarriespress.html. The author has published some of the material in the book on her website: ...


3

Most of the advice before me is good advice. Here is my 2 cents. As a father with two high school dancers that have danced since age 3 - one daughter just shows up. The other daughter practices before dance class and then practices after dance class. The daughter that just shows up - she's tired of dance and does not want to dance after high school. ...


5

I have faced this very challenge with my son. Here are a few ideas (in addition to the main idea mentioned by several people, of giving her a larger pond to swim in): Let her go to a dance camp for one or two weeks in the summer. (Choose carefully.) There are sleep-away versions and day programs. If the day program is out of town, contact the director ...


1

"How do I convince my eleven-year-old to practice her dancing?" How about, don't? Let her decide for herself if she wants to invest the time practicing. You can push her, but she will resent you for it. Simply tell her that all the best dancers practice and stretch, so if she wants to be the best she should emulate them, otherwise she can just do it for ...


1

I'm not going to tell you to deliver an ultimatum, but... You are in a sense enabling the behavior. You could move her to a different studio as the other answers suggested, but if you are that concerned with your daughter going through the motions you could simply stop supporting her in doing so. Even if you are so financially well-off that the money is ...


7

I can speak from experience as someone who has had multiple talents, but is lazy: I do things because I enjoy them. I, for example, rarely did anything with my clarinet for the sake of becoming a better clarinetist. The music we were going to perform? I played it because I enjoyed playing it. I never really practiced for an abstract sense of becoming ...


11

There's a common saying among highly-successful people, which is to never be the smartest person in the room. You grow by surrounding yourself with people who challenge you to be better. Somewhat counterintuitively, if you want to be truly successful, you need to fail sometimes. If you never fail, you're not pushing your boundaries. You're playing it too ...


15

This can be a common issue in children who are very successful in almost anything: when they are motivated by success, and that success is easy to achieve, they see no reason to work hard to achieve basically the same success. The returns for additional success tend to be diminishing; being a big fish in a small pond can be very comfortable to someone ...


1

The computer/phone time (Facebook, etc.) need to be set up as free-time pursuits, i.e. rewards for having made a solid effort with schoolwork and helping around the house. Once she starts experiencing some success in school, and understands the pattern, it will get easier to implement. This is called parental discipline.


0

Teenagers, even ones who appear to waste their lives on social media, cannot possibly have an absolute lack of interests. And while I am only reluctantly admitting this, social media in itself is a profession, and in these days it is becoming more integral and valuable. I strongly dislike social media for a huge number of reasons but it is undeniable that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included