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13

The key here is Don't Read Books You Don't Enjoy. Peter: [reading a review of a boxing match in a hushed, storytelling way] The champ caught Smith with a savage left hook... Michael: What are you reading her? Peter: [responding to Michael in same tone] It doesn't matter what I read, it's the tone you use. She doesn't understand the words ...


10

I think @deworde has the best advice to help motivate you to read stories. However, I wanted to add an answer that mentions options other than reading. Until they are about six months old, babies will rely on tone of voice and sentence patterns to help learn to understand you. The more you interact with them, the better they'll be able to learn how to ...


9

If you want your child to understand language, you have to talk to your child. A study was done on the differing number of words per hour spoken to a child in low income, middle class, and professional families. The difference was startling. A low income child would hear 600 words per hour. A middle class child 1200. A professional class child 2100. A ...


9

You recognize already that this is a developmental issue. It takes time, work, and maturity to develop. In addition, I think what you are describing is more than an appreciation issue. It can also be about control. A five-year-old has very little control in her life - she doesn't get to choose how the money is spent, what time she goes to bed, what she ...


8

I have had some success (in an unpaid, friend of the family or parent of the child's friend kind of way) with the following approach: Stop referring to them, even inside your own head as lazy-to-think. While that is one possible explanation for them not answering, or blurting out any old number without working it out first, there are plenty of others: they ...


8

Because you care about mathematical concepts and your daughter learning them, most likely she will learn them. You will point them out and talk about them. "see honey, you had one slice of banana, now, you have more slices of banana." You will be drawn to stories that contain math concepts (yes, they are out there) and games that teach mathematical ...


7

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


6

Even if you are speaking their native language children don't understand all of what is being understood, especially if they are very young. Children enjoy the act of listening and looking at the pictures, and being with their parent. Don't worry about the comprehension, that will come in time. Your motivation is simply the enjoyment of reading a story with ...


6

Chrys' Answer covers most of the ground I was going to, but one suggestion might be gamification. From what you've said, some children see no value in going beyond basic maths, and while you might be able to convince them that those jobs they plan for require maths (good luck being a householder who can't balance a monthly budget), that's not always valid, ...


6

This may seem counterintuitive, but babies and small children will do the best at math if they are told stories and learn to tell stories themselves. O'Neille et al. (below) found that storytelling is an essential precursor for the development of logical thinking. This makes sense when you think about the fact that storytelling is ingrained in centuries of ...


5

The solution is in your question : some of them also early decide that they will be artists, dancers, athletes, house-wives, etc so they don't need mathematics. Involve their goal/hobbies/interests in your teaching. There is a high level of opportunity there. Applied mathematics are probably the key for most people having issues with formal ...


5

If your son is already failing all those courses and not doing homework, then it is probably too late for grounding to be effective. Sometimes I question the effectivity of grounding at all in teenagers, but that is beside the point here. Your son is becoming independent, and he has reasons (however ill-founded) for deciding to not do the work. Negative ...


5

While I personally have a number of issues with Kohn's book, I do agree that "do-this-and-you-get-that" is a poor system, fraught with problems. The stance that we are taking with my son (who is still only two, but its never too early to start expecting participation) is that chores are things that just need to get done, and that we expect him to do those ...


5

First off, rewards do not have to be financial. They can be encouragement, praise, getting to stay up a little later...anything Secondly, as adults we do chores not because we want to but because we know the consequences will be more work later in tidying up - children can be taught this from quite an early age. When they are very young they don't have ...


5

From my personal experience (mother of two college-age boys, former elementary school and pre-school teacher, current librarian) and many, many years of professional reading... Preliminary thoughts Kids develop differently. If you had not had the Harry Potter experience with your older child, you would probably be less worried about your younger child. ...


5

Reading is a means to an end. People don't read just to read. Otherwise, we'd pop open a dictionary to relax after a hard day. We read to be entertained by a story, to learn about topics, or to communicate. You need to first think about the ends your son enjoys, then find reading material to further those ends. Go to the library and explore all the ...


4

Wow! does that sound familiar! As a former Middle school teacher I can tell you I had a least a couple of these kids every year. A specialist I know you don't want to throw meds at it - so please know I'm not including this information for that purpose. ADD and ADHD shows up a little differently in girls and what you describe actually describes what I ...


4

Sounds like she's tried a lot of great things. She would be welcome to check out The Learning Tree by Stanley Greenpsan. It's written for parents to help them understand any learning difficulties their child might have and activities to boost skills. I'm not saying this child has one, but it's a way for the mother to think about possibilities without getting ...


4

I'm not convinced there's an age at which kids CANNOT learn something. You certainly need the basic building blocks before you can start constructing a tower, but at any age they seem to have the ability to learn all sorts of mathematical concepts. Verbalizing them is something entirely different, of course. First, to directly address your question about ...


3

Many math teachers fall into the trap to teaching only the procedural knowledge of math--that is, they get so wrapped up in teaching the steps to successfully work the problem that they forget to teach their students the declarative knowledge of math--the WHY they need to be able to do math. As balanced mama said, the more you can incorporate real life and ...


3

Is it worth reversing the question back onto yourself... asking yourself "Why am I so lazy at teaching?" That's not to say you are lazy, but being good at a subject and being good at teaching it aren't even the same ballpark. So what are your roadblocks to getting through to them. At ages 12-15 they're starting to enter the adult world and in a private ...


2

Are you more about the reading, or the consuming information? It may be that reading words is not how he likes to consume information. If so, you have two separate and independent paths: help him to consume information that can enable him to be better at the creative and inventive things he's doing, or just to enjoy himself. Watching movies, online videos, ...


2

Depending on your circumstances this may seem like a drastic solution, but this is what I recommend: Take your family on holiday to India, or some other developing nation. Make an effort to go to places where you will see some real disadvantage, where she will see little girls with dusty dreadlocks, torn dresses and no shoes (and not much food). Consider ...


2

This is a common problem for younger siblings and although, I have an only child (at the moment) I've worked quite a bit with a number of different ages etc. I would address this one in a combination of ways and figure on it being a process to "fix." Show her how her brother has had to practice to learn things Do you still have any samples of her older ...


2

If punishments are not working, switch things around and offer rewards for doing the right thing. If she completes the task, she gets X reward. If she completes it quickly, she gets something better. If it's not done at all, then the standard punishments will be applied. For example... If you tidy your room, you can stay up a little later tonight. If ...


1

I think teachers and some homeschoolers are now starting to teach math earlier and earlier because when the kids are younger, they have a tremendous and almost instinctual ability to pick up concepts. My kids started showing signs of understanding rather early and I helped them (without overwhelming them with too much information) by allowing them to ...


1

You are (were) a teacher, does it work if you sit down with him and assist him with his homework? It may not be a long term solution, but might be enough to get him kick-started. The broad spread of problem subjects probably shows that it is not one subject that is difficult, rather a greater motivation issue. We found with our daughter (12) that there ...


1

I agree with everyone who has posted on here. Growing up, my math teachers only cared to finish the syllabus and not really see if anyone understood anything - as long as they felt like their job was done. It's very hard to get kids to think that Math is worthwhile. What I do is have a blend of activities to keep their attention. Have some roleplaying where ...


1

A blog I read suggested giving a task that must be done to the youngest child capable. This is because than the child gets a "big person" job, and not the same childish job they have been doing for a long while. Also, older children see their younger siblings are also asked to help out. Children frequently are motivated by thinking of themselves as more ...


1

Children learn by example so here is my few points First, don't eve make the mistake of comparing your child to other children. it doesn't help "Children learn to enjoy study sessions when these come wrapped in love". First try to read with your child. http://m.wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/2010526?q=children+reading&p=par "A powerful ally of love is ...



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