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22

The value of money is a pretty abstract concept, and difficult for young children (and many adults!) to grok. When your son gives money to friends and relatives, he's likely learning a different lesson about the value of money: when he gives it to people, they say nice things to him. As was mentioned in a comment above, that's not necessarily a bad ...


9

It seems to me that the question you linked (I haven't read all the answers) is about things which should be considered normal (sleeping in her own bed). Maybe the main objection ("the child will become reluctant to do things if there are no rewards") can be mitigated by clearly defining what chores the child is expected to do normally (tidying her room, ...


5

I suggest you go back and read the full report you cited more thoroughly, as I doubt you will find anything better than that. It is 32 pages long. You will find: If your gross income level is less than about $60K, you will spend about 25% raising a child. At $60k-$105k, you will spend about 16%. Over $105K, you will spend about 12%. These are averages ...


5

First and foremost, your parents are the only parents you have, and they will always be your parents. It can be easy at times to forget this, particularly while you are angry at them, but underneath it all, they're your family, and you (almost certainly) love them. Being angry/disappointed/frustrated with someone is not mutually exclusive with loving them. ...


5

Doing a chore and getting an immediate reward like candy is an easy and natural association and can be learned quickly. The further you seperate the reward in time the harder it is to associate. If you give them money and a week later they can buy something with it, it isn't a natural concept, so can take longer to master. They are dependent on you to ...


3

It depends a lot on your culture, but rather than trying to raise the value of money in his mind and thereby encourage him to deny it to others, giving it special status, I'd suggest helping him understand what one-way monetary transactions mean in your culture. For instance, in one culture, giving money without exchanging it for anything else may make the ...


3

I tell my kids that cash is a very special thing that needs very special handling. They are not allowed to engage in cash transactions without prior approval - neither giving no receiving. They are explicitly allowed to buy items in shops and from food vendors, while everything else requires a review. The problem I see is that kids, without realizing it, ...


3

19 years old ! This "kid" really needs a reality check. Some suggestions - Try to find out why he needs more. To impress girls, to fit in with the rich crowd etc. ? If those are the reasons behind his behavior, then explain why he should not spend money on those things. Tell him to get a job as short-term experiment and see how money does not literally ...


2

The first thing to do is to take a deep breath. This is a situation with a lot of emotional ties pulling your girlfriend in many different directions. There are a lot of relationships involved so at some point, so tread lightly. That said... Consider where you want you, your girlfriend and her daughter to be in two year's time. That's your short term ...


2

Here's a different take on the cost of raising children from the Fraser Institute (2009) in Canada which looked at numbers for Canada, the US, Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand. They found a significant flaw in traditional methods of calculating the cost of raising children, which is that adding children to the family doesn't so much add costs as it ...


1

In my household I simply expect everybody to contribute. Of course, that's only according to their abilities, and of course children should have lots of free time left. But there are chores to be done, and some of them are done by the kids. Their sole incentive doing them is that they contribute to the community they live in. Over the years we have ...


1

That sort of thing is mostly useful for people in highly dangerous industries that involve radiation exposure, or other serious injuries that are nonfatal but prevent you from fathering children. So, if you're a tech at a nuclear power plant, I suggest you look into this. Similarly, if you have cancer in an area near your testes, and require radiation ...


1

Personally I would cancel it, but I am super cheap :) I agree with @anongoodnurse here, put that money into life insurance instead (or invest it for retirement). The question of sperm "going stale" seems like it is more appropriate to ask the sperm bank, that is sort of their thing. Personally I would not keep my sperm around so my wife could have a child ...


1

This sounds like it may be an issue of not understanding the value of money. Does he understand that his toys, television, outings, etc. cost money? Maybe go through the steps of going to work to earn money, then paying bills, buying groceries, then the leftovers for savings/fun money. We're working on the same thing with our daughter (5 years old). She ...


1

Can she find another woman in the same situations who she TRUSTS? Through some church group maybe? One of them can watch the kids, one can work and pay her half? Two kids are really easier to take care of at that age than only one, they keep each other entertained. Or they can both get part-time jobs and watch the others kids when they're not working?


1

I agreed with many of the points offered with the most upvoted answers, but I felt that they all could include something more. I believe that having a detailed budget is the biggest aide in becoming financially independent and stable. You need to know how much many you have coming in, and how much money you have going out. Other answers have suggested ...



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