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22

The value of money is a pretty abstract concept, and difficult for young children (and many adults!) to grok. When your son gives money to friends and relatives, he's likely learning a different lesson about the value of money: when he gives it to people, they say nice things to him. As was mentioned in a comment above, that's not necessarily a bad ...


14

Is this a problem? My personal feeling is that, yes it is. The issue here is one potentially of child abuse -- not your children, but of M. I would question whether M has been subjected to inappropriate requests, or even subject to CSE. It could actually be nothing, but if M is being abused at home or elsewhere it could save M years of hurt if things were ...


9

It seems to me that the question you linked (I haven't read all the answers) is about things which should be considered normal (sleeping in her own bed). Maybe the main objection ("the child will become reluctant to do things if there are no rewards") can be mitigated by clearly defining what chores the child is expected to do normally (tidying her room, ...


7

It depends on your point of view. Were I the parent, I would offer to pay rent. Were I the child, I would decline the offer. In any case, I would advise both parties not to become dependent on the financial arrangement, if at all possible, even non-fiscal benefits like babysitting or housework. If you pay rent, don't make it so high or deplete your ...


6

According to the USDA's Expenditures on Children by Families annual study (2013 is the latest I found): Table 10. Estimated annual expenditures* on a child born in 2013 by income group, overall United States Income group Year Age Lowest Middle Highest 2013 <1 $9,480 $12,940 $21,430 2014 1 9,710 13,250 21,940 2015 2 9,940 13,570 22,470 2016 3 ...


6

My answer for both of situations (parent with child, child with parent), is likely to be the same. Although, I would give more leeway to a person attending some form of college or vocational training, regardless if that was a traditional student or a returning-ed adult. I don't think there is any moral obligation for the parent to pay rent to their child. I ...


5

Doing a chore and getting an immediate reward like candy is an easy and natural association and can be learned quickly. The further you seperate the reward in time the harder it is to associate. If you give them money and a week later they can buy something with it, it isn't a natural concept, so can take longer to master. They are dependent on you to ...


5

I suggest you go back and read the full report you cited more thoroughly, as I doubt you will find anything better than that. It is 32 pages long. You will find: If your gross income level is less than about $60K, you will spend about 25% raising a child. At $60k-$105k, you will spend about 16%. Over $105K, you will spend about 12%. These are averages ...


3

It depends a lot on your culture, but rather than trying to raise the value of money in his mind and thereby encourage him to deny it to others, giving it special status, I'd suggest helping him understand what one-way monetary transactions mean in your culture. For instance, in one culture, giving money without exchanging it for anything else may make the ...


3

I tell my kids that cash is a very special thing that needs very special handling. They are not allowed to engage in cash transactions without prior approval - neither giving no receiving. They are explicitly allowed to buy items in shops and from food vendors, while everything else requires a review. The problem I see is that kids, without realizing it, ...


2

Here's a different take on the cost of raising children from the Fraser Institute (2009) in Canada which looked at numbers for Canada, the US, Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand. They found a significant flaw in traditional methods of calculating the cost of raising children, which is that adding children to the family doesn't so much add costs as it ...


2

I took a roll of pennies and spray painted them gold so they couldn't get mixed up/mistaken for normal money. These were "pirate coins" or "treasure". I used them to reward extra good behavior and routine tasks that they needed some motivation for (1 penny for doing a good job brushing teeth, 1 penny for sorting laundry, etc). There were several benefits ...


1

A couple points of perspective: I've always believed that moral obligation goes from parents to offspring. Any obligation perceived by offspring in the opposite direction comes out of the feelings of the offspring. Circumstances of need clearly can affect feelings at any time. Children don't ask to be born. They have zero say in their birth situation, so ...


1

In my household I simply expect everybody to contribute. Of course, that's only according to their abilities, and of course children should have lots of free time left. But there are chores to be done, and some of them are done by the kids. Their sole incentive doing them is that they contribute to the community they live in. Over the years we have ...


1

That sort of thing is mostly useful for people in highly dangerous industries that involve radiation exposure, or other serious injuries that are nonfatal but prevent you from fathering children. So, if you're a tech at a nuclear power plant, I suggest you look into this. Similarly, if you have cancer in an area near your testes, and require radiation ...


1

Personally I would cancel it, but I am super cheap :) I agree with @anongoodnurse here, put that money into life insurance instead (or invest it for retirement). The question of sperm "going stale" seems like it is more appropriate to ask the sperm bank, that is sort of their thing. Personally I would not keep my sperm around so my wife could have a child ...


1

This sounds like it may be an issue of not understanding the value of money. Does he understand that his toys, television, outings, etc. cost money? Maybe go through the steps of going to work to earn money, then paying bills, buying groceries, then the leftovers for savings/fun money. We're working on the same thing with our daughter (5 years old). She ...


1

I agreed with many of the points offered with the most upvoted answers, but I felt that they all could include something more. I believe that having a detailed budget is the biggest aide in becoming financially independent and stable. You need to know how much many you have coming in, and how much money you have going out. Other answers have suggested ...


1

there are some good and also some wildly crazy answers on here. A realistic idea of the costs, accounting for detergent and energy costs is provided by eLeMeNO-Pee on their site at http://www.elemeno-pee.com/calculator This is a great cloth diaper calculator that compares costs and lets you play with a few variables with just a few clicks.



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