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8

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...


7

The best age is "when you need them". But let me elaborate: Math starts way before school, because you need mathematical concepts to explain the everyday world. But we usually don't call it "Math", unless we are thinking about it. Start with simple counting: Count the apples when buying them at the store. Count the chairs at the table. Count fingers, ...


4

Check out Khan Academy, Math Mammoth, Saxon, Abeka, Singapore, Math-U-See, and Miquon. Those are the major curricula used by homeschoolers. The leap pad 2 tablets have some nice math games, and there are tons of apps for iPad and Android if you search the app stores. You can find a lot of individual activities by searching pinterest or ...


3

I'm sure there will be more detailed and informative answers, but to start things off: Show her how the math she's learning now (at 14, probably some variety of Algebra, possibly Geometry) will inform later studies in a wide variety of subjects. Sure, some of algebra is a bit boring, but you have to know how to solve X=2X+4 before you can master physics, ...


3

The current trend in test-driven school systems like in the United States is to introduce the formal academics too early. By "formal" I mean where you sit down with a page full of problems that you solve for its own sake. That means the role of parents today is largely helping your children keep up and not feel frustrated or stupid at not quite being ready ...


2

https://www.khanacademy.org/ has a lot of resources. Practice problems, hints, how-to videos. There is a myriad of open source textbooks out there too. These are mostly college texts, but there are also some high school texts. There are a lot of homeschooling resources out there too.


2

I completely agree with Joe's answer but wanted to add an example from my experience. I found math in middle school and high school to be as boring as rocks. I was lucky, because my dad bought back some books on fractals and I could use some programs (and write some myself) to see how math was involved in: the Mandelbrot set measuring the coastline or ...


1

A math teacher friend of mine recommended Saxon or Singapore. There are a ton of resources available for each. Based on some research I'm going to go with Saxon.


1

As early as possible (but not earlier) and at whatever pace the child can keep up with. I find pocket money is an excellent tool to learn to count, add and subtract, provides incentives to get it right, but earlier on, there are many games you can use to tickle the math neurones. When your child starts reasoning about his surroundings (which varies from ...


1

It sounds like he needs drills, and if he thinks he's bad at it the drills need to be fun. We have some tablet math drill games that our kids (7 & 8) really like. Ours are Lakeshore Learning, but you can check out TuxMath and GCompris (for Linux) or ask the teacher for suggestions. Our kids are not way behind but they need some more support. We have ...


1

It's tough not to speak the language of your child's school instruction. But there is a very helpful tool out there! Dutch speaking kids have the possibility to use rekentuin, or 'calculating garden' for learning basic mathematical operations. It's made like a game, you have four flowers (one for each operation) and as you answer questions, the flowers grow. ...


1

I don't know what the school system is like where you are, but I suggest talking to the school and finding out if there are ways he can be taught different approaches to math - whether that means a different teacher who has a different approach, or some outside help. Math is very hard to learn if you're not taught in a way that makes sense to you, and ...



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