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12

It is my belief that facts are only memorized when there is a motivation to do so, and that by far the best motivation is relevance to something the individual cares about. Thus memorizing facts on their own is hard, but doing interesting problems which require those facts will lead to natural memorization through repetition. Therefore I would recommend ...


8

I have had some success (in an unpaid, friend of the family or parent of the child's friend kind of way) with the following approach: Stop referring to them, even inside your own head as lazy-to-think. While that is one possible explanation for them not answering, or blurting out any old number without working it out first, there are plenty of others: they ...


8

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


8

Because you care about mathematical concepts and your daughter learning them, most likely she will learn them. You will point them out and talk about them. "see honey, you had one slice of banana, now, you have more slices of banana." You will be drawn to stories that contain math concepts (yes, they are out there) and games that teach mathematical ...


7

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...


7

The best age is "when you need them". But let me elaborate: Math starts way before school, because you need mathematical concepts to explain the everyday world. But we usually don't call it "Math", unless we are thinking about it. Start with simple counting: Count the apples when buying them at the store. Count the chairs at the table. Count fingers, ...


6

My favourite math games use cards: cribbage (adding to 15, counting to 31, matching) snap (matching) war (more than, less than) beat the calculator (one person has a calculator, the other doesn't, 2 cards are turned up; first person with the answer wins, calculator alternates between people) You can also use dice. Playing Yahtzee requires counting and ...


6

Chrys' Answer covers most of the ground I was going to, but one suggestion might be gamification. From what you've said, some children see no value in going beyond basic maths, and while you might be able to convince them that those jobs they plan for require maths (good luck being a householder who can't balance a monthly budget), that's not always valid, ...


6

This may seem counterintuitive, but babies and small children will do the best at math if they are told stories and learn to tell stories themselves. O'Neille et al. (below) found that storytelling is an essential precursor for the development of logical thinking. This makes sense when you think about the fact that storytelling is ingrained in centuries of ...


5

The solution is in your question : some of them also early decide that they will be artists, dancers, athletes, house-wives, etc so they don't need mathematics. Involve their goal/hobbies/interests in your teaching. There is a high level of opportunity there. Applied mathematics are probably the key for most people having issues with formal ...


5

Piaget's developmental stage theory, despite its wide-ranging impact on education, is highly questionable today in many respects. His research methods were erroneous, and there is plenty of evidence that his overly rigid stage concept is wrong. Milestones based on the theory are also questionable, and in any event general milestones cannot be used to ...


4

Definitely try Khan Academy! It's free! Google and the Gates Foundation have contributed money sponsoring it. There is talk of it being translated. presents math drills from 1+1 to university level calculus and algebra supported by youtube videos explaining the concepts achieve badges based on proficiency must answer 10 questions in a row correctly in ...


4

I remember in elementary school (somewhere between grade 1-5, probably 3 for this example) we had some person from some company (or maybe government) come in and teach us division. It was very cool how she did it (well, at the time I thought so anyway). We were in a big hall. There was some 28-30 (assume 30 for this example) of us. We were asked to divide ...


4

I'm not convinced there's an age at which kids CANNOT learn something. You certainly need the basic building blocks before you can start constructing a tower, but at any age they seem to have the ability to learn all sorts of mathematical concepts. Verbalizing them is something entirely different, of course. First, to directly address your question about ...


4

When I was 3 year old, my dad gave me a calculator and taught me to use it for addition and multiplication. I started playing with it and memorising the results, so at 4 I was already able not to use the calculator. So the calculation aids are not necessarily evil. Sometimes they help. Why don't you just play with the kid, so that the kid asks you question ...


4

Check out Khan Academy, Math Mammoth, Saxon, Abeka, Singapore, Math-U-See, and Miquon. Those are the major curricula used by homeschoolers. The leap pad 2 tablets have some nice math games, and there are tons of apps for iPad and Android if you search the app stores. You can find a lot of individual activities by searching pinterest or ...


3

Is it worth reversing the question back onto yourself... asking yourself "Why am I so lazy at teaching?" That's not to say you are lazy, but being good at a subject and being good at teaching it aren't even the same ballpark. So what are your roadblocks to getting through to them. At ages 12-15 they're starting to enter the adult world and in a private ...


3

Abstract thinking requires practice. While Piaget's theories about child development are somewhat reliable for young children, the wheels tend to come off the Piaget bus when it comes to abstract thinking and when different people acquire abstract thinking skills. New research now tells us that the adult brain is not really fully developed until well into a ...


3

You child has mastered a skill and finds it boring? Don't ask her to do drill on that skill, do something she'll find challenging, even if it's outside of her current curriculum. For example, addition and subtraction are used all around us; when you go shopping, ask what change you should expect. Ask what notes and coins the change will come in (best ...


3

There are a few tv shows that help preschoolers familiarize (noy really teach, in my opinion) with mathematical concepts. Among them: Numberjacks, Team Umizoomi.


3

Schoolhouse Rock is always the top of the heap for multiplication. It worked in 1974 and still works frighteningly well today. As for addition and other basic forms; I'd suggest scouring YouTube. I've been very fortunate to find, not merely old Sesame Street counting; but other educational vids. (Note the answer from Dr. Stiehler above supports educational ...


3

Do you mean Glenn Doman's Dot Method?


3

Many math teachers fall into the trap to teaching only the procedural knowledge of math--that is, they get so wrapped up in teaching the steps to successfully work the problem that they forget to teach their students the declarative knowledge of math--the WHY they need to be able to do math. As balanced mama said, the more you can incorporate real life and ...


3

The current trend in test-driven school systems like in the United States is to introduce the formal academics too early. By "formal" I mean where you sit down with a page full of problems that you solve for its own sake. That means the role of parents today is largely helping your children keep up and not feel frustrated or stupid at not quite being ready ...


3

I'm sure there will be more detailed and informative answers, but to start things off: Show her how the math she's learning now (at 14, probably some variety of Algebra, possibly Geometry) will inform later studies in a wide variety of subjects. Sure, some of algebra is a bit boring, but you have to know how to solve X=2X+4 before you can master physics, ...


2

Perhaps you are referring to Touch Math. If so, here is a link with more info. http://www.touchmath.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=WYT.welcome&page=AboutTouchMath


2

I found 'Great Big Book of Children's Games' with a google book search and searched for 'math' within the book: goo.gl/e6f25 Some examples of math related children's games: Casino (card Game) Number Tic-Tac-Toe Shut the Box Brother Jonathan You may be able to find a number of other games with similar searches.


2

I always enjoyed the animations at "Brain Pop". They have a math section. http://www.brainpop.com/


2

Here are links to a variety of math games that I suspect would be appropriate. http://thematicunits.theteacherscorner.net/math-games.php#activities Scroll to the Games to Create section (below the online games) for details of various math games. http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/ Select a specific math worksheet on the left and optional games ...


2

This was my problem at primary school - my initial solution was to try and find practical problems that required arithmetic. This kept me interested for a year or so, and by that stage the school had realised what I needed and provided extra tuition in calculus and the more fun aspects of mathematics. If your school can't or won't support a gifted child ...



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