Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

In general, you should be praising effort rather than results. A child that has difficulty remembering Grandma's name, and thinks hard and remembers, should be praised for the effort to try and remember. A child that has a hard time walking should be praised for the effort to try and walk, whether or not it is successful. As such, the "Wow" is ...


7

I don't think there's a definitive answer as children vary widely in coordination and ability at a given age. Enthusiasm also is a big factor. My son has been helping unload the dishwasher, load and unload the washing machine and dryer since he was 1 and a half. We didn't ask him to do anything, he just walked over and started doing it because he wanted to ...


4

I'm glad you asked this question as my 4-year-old has started spending more time in the kitchen with me (though mostly he just wants to lick the cake batter bowl). So...of course I went to do some research. The What's Cooking with Kids website has some excellent suggestions on how to ease kids into chopping and there are some excellent alternative chopping ...


4

While setting examples for both work ethic and life balance, you should think out loud, because you also need to set the example of how to make decisions that weigh one against the other. Present it not as a lecture, but just a musing on your choices. This works for all sorts of decision-making, like how to spend/save money, how to tell someone something but ...


2

So of course GdD's answer that there isn't a definitive answer is absolutely true in that no two kids are alike and one must gauge where an individual is at any given time. Still, there are guidelines of what can typically be expected at certain age levels. So far, I have found this list to be fairly accurate in our home, but it is missing quite a few ...


2

Yes, she's probably ready. I think the most important criterion in deciding whether or not to try learning to use a knife is willingness to follow directions. If she's not listening to and obeying every word you say, no knife practice, period. That and sufficient gross motor and fine motor skills to control the knife would be important. If she can handle ...


2

We always did it by describing behaviors rather than overtly praising them. This left the child to ascribe pride to the accomplishment on his own. For example, we would say, "You climbed all the way to the top!" - without any overstated objectives. Sometimes we might comment on the effort it took, like: "You tied your shoes. That's a hard thing to learn."


2

It is important to give positive feedback to what children do, even if the "reward" seems to be much too much for the actual task. For once this is important in the development of a child (receive positive feedback develops motivation) and for second you need to see the difficulty from the eyes of a 3-year old. Even walking is a challenge at that age. With ...


1

The main ill effects are a sense of stress from the routine being disrupted, and being hungry or tired from not eating or resting when their body is accustomed. However, different children have different tolerances for variation. One of our daughters has an extreme need for routine, but our son seems to have almost no sense of time at all. Our other ...


1

We let ours start to chop from about four years old, but to keep things safe we bought a safety knife for them, which is serrated but very blunt, with a rounded end. The serrations will allow the cutting of most vegetables, although tomatoes may just squash. It works perfectly for peppers and carrots. We also found a safe peeler for carrots that reduces ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible