Hot answers tagged

58

This one may be a challenge - UK laws on knife carrying are not age-related (although there is an age limit on purchasing knives) but they are related to size of knife and to some extent what you are doing with it and where you are carrying it. Personally I think a Swiss Army Knife is appropriate for outdoorsy kids from an early age - whenever they can ...


45

I am a scout leader from Germany. We allow children to carry pocket knives as young as 8, but only under these conditions: Children with "behavior problems" are exempt (at the discretion of their leader). If they want to have one, they are first taught the rules of using knives (it's a tool and not a weapon, never cut towards your own body, never cut ...


19

First of all, the "how should I handle this" depends a lot on what your own concerns are. Is your concern the "cousin" part? or the "two 14 year olds" part? If the latter, is it specific aspect (are they mature enough to consistently use birth control?) or just general age-readiness for sex as a concept? Once you sort out your concerns, the main and best ...


16

Disclaimer .. IANAL, and A needs a lawyer. I don't think there are inherent legal rights conferred by being a "god-parent". However ... the real answer is it depends who is contesting. If no one contests, the court will award A custody. It will initially temporary, and she will need to petition for adoption after all is settled. Relevant Issues: ...


10

Eleven is an OK age for handling a nice compact Swiss Army knife. That said, he (or she) would need to be taught and shown how to use and handle it, in just the same was as you might show him(her) how to hammer a nail (Hammers are very dangerous - just check how many gruesome TV murders use one ;-). It's important that you are happy to provide the help and ...


8

The research referred to on the program was a study out of the Universty of Toronto (by Esme Fuller-Thomson and Angela Dalton) published in Psychiatry Research which "examined gender specific differences among a sample of 6,647 adults, of whom 695 had experienced parental divorce before the age of 18." So they were talking to adults about whether they had ...


7

You should talk to your Sea Cadet leader. Scouting and cadet organisations are used to dealing with both the laws and the practical safety aspects of children with knives. If I recall correctly from when my son was in Scouts, its basically illegal for him to carry it unless he is going to an event where the organisers have declared that knives are intended ...


6

Legally, no medical procedures can be done to minors without parental consent (with exceptions in some states for contraceptive care for teenagers). In practice, doctors who claim emergency medical necessity can basically do what they think is necessary. For more legal advice than that general information, you should ask a lawyer. I recommend you air these ...


6

We've gifted pocket knives to our kids as young as 7 years old. It's about the time they start scouting and other outdoor youth programs, where they would have a good environment and reason to use one. Proper training occurs over time - a one time teaching session isn't enough. Once you give them one it's best to create activities and opportunities to use ...


6

I am from Anchorage, Alaska, so I will not attempt to comment on UK law or social norms. However, I grew up with knives and think I can comment on that aspect from another perspective. Alaska is an idiosyncratic locale, and we are generally raised in a more experiential (i.e., learn not to cut yourself by accidentally cutting yourself) way. I was given my ...


6

The following link from .gov.uk clearly describes the UK legislation. https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives In essence carrying a knife with a folding blade of length less than 3 inches is legal. Threatening someone with a knife of any size is, of course, illegal. Even though a small knife is legal, if your lad is stopped by the Police or by a teacher ...


6

Adding to tomjedrz... Things to consider: Who currently has physical custody of the children? If it is A, make it official with the authorities, such as a family court or child protective services. If not we will need more information. What sort of documents are available to assert B's intentions? Find letters, emails, baptismal records, power of attorney ...


6

This all depends on where you live. If you live in some countries, where they adore their kids, then this would be considered par for the course. I remember walking down a street with our (then) three year old daughter in one such country. A waitress came out of a cafe, picked her up, and carried her into the shop. 30 seconds later they re-emerged, our ...


5

There are 2 (possible) issues here. Age You could be concerned about the age. This does raise a few concerns: What happens if they break up? Will she be able to cope? A number of people around my age have been in serious committed, sexual relationships and haven't worked out - for a number of reasons. It often seems to be that those boys who will enter ...


4

Here is a list based on our experiences, and what I was able to research: Identification Apply for (and order copies of) birth certificate Apply for social security card Apply for passport (if desired) Legal Update your will: Name a guardian for your child Designate what your child should inherit, and how that money should be ...


4

How you handle it is entirely up to you. If you choose to bail her out, I believe it is reasonable to ask for something in return. What that something is is up to you (I also advise that you have some sort of documentation of any agreement you make that will hold up in court, but I digress). If you don't cancel the order, you aren't doing anything wrong. ...


4

Your son is 11, and really shouldn't be privy to the monetary specifics of your relationship with his mother. However, "Should" often doesn't translate to reality. So you need to be prepared, if you take this step of denying her and in effect sending her to jail (let's call a spade a spade; your son may well see it this way), or of cutting her out of your ...


3

From a legal standpoint, if you think she would sign over rights in exchange for cancelling the child support, I would do it. This doesn't have to limit her ability to see the child, but it does give you legal protection if she decides she wants to go for custody later on (personal experience - my stepbrother's mom did just that, in hopes of getting my dad ...


3

Your child has a human right to a family life with his mother. Her financial debts to you are irrelevant to that right. She has a human right to a family life with her child, and again her debts to you are irrelevant to that right. These rights can be interfered with, but only in extreme situations. Is the child at risk of physical, sexual, or emotional ...


3

Not only is it probably not illegal, it might actually be illegal for them to allow it due to overly restrictive school safety regulation. Assuming this is not a legal issue, it is certainly a liability issue. It might be possible to work something out with them where you provide permission (in writing) that your child is allowed to walk home.


3

I am in US, and my son age 10 has a tiny swiss-army type of knife because he loves gadgets. My biggest fear is that he would get into some silly argument with his buddies(my knife is better than your knife - look at it!), show them his knife, and will be accused of aggression. In US the consequences can be horrendous. So he is only allowed to use it at ...


3

As naomisl said, legally they can't do anything without your consent, and they have a lot of checks and balances to make sure the right baby gets matched with the right parents. However, a lot of that consent also comes by way of the forms you sign when you are first admitted, in addition to sort of rushed "okays" you give when they ask a question like, ...


2

A recent company I worked for disallowed carrying a Swiss Army Knife, so I changed things up a bit and carried a Leatherman 831488 Style PS Multi-Tool. This is a multi-tool with some most-requested features, but explicitly be designed to be openly allowed by the US TSA to be taken through airport security. This may, or may not, be an appropriate solution to ...


2

He needs to understand that it is only appropriate to carry the knife under certain circumstances and that trying to sneak it out without permission will be punished harshly. If he is not mature enough to understand that then I would not get it for him. I have no idea what the policy of the sea cadets is on knives and would suggest you talk to them before ...


2

My kids got theirs when they were 5, but we got the special rounded end models. Once we'd shown them how to open and close them and to use them properly we've never had any problems As far as the legal aspect goes; I've honestly never considered it. http://www.knivesandtools.co.uk/en/pt/-victorinox-children-s-folder.htm


2

The home study is the part that sounds the scariest, but it's really the most insignificant part of the process. They give you a checklist, just follow it. What we found was that it was a convenient excuse for making sure we were mentally prepared for fostering and adoption. The first time we looked into adoption we realized we weren't ready by the fact ...


2

You know - I'd be a hell of a lot happier if my ex were out of my life too. But she's only in my life BECAUSE we made a couple of awesome kids together. And the kids are already old enough to know that mom can be unreasonable, that mom has her faults, and where mom falls down in the parenting department. They also know all that stuff about me too because ...


1

I don't think the other answers recognize the legalities of your question and it really should be asked on the Legal SE but I can answer you here. Child support is not yours. It is your child's. Your child is not 18 so cannot legally bind a contract. Therefore the courts are the guardian of the child and look after his rights. No court that I know of ...


1

Life Insurance. You have someone (your child) now who is completely and solely dependent upon you to take care of them. If something unfortunate were to happen and you were no longer there to provide for them, that would be tragic. Life insurance, like any other insurance, is a necessary evil for parents of young children. Tern life insurance is typically ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible