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1

A lot depends on how interested the child is in the topic, and how she responds to difficult topics. I wish I could find the reference at the moment, but I read an article a while ago about how children will persevere through very difficult material if it is personally interesting to them. For example, how Homer Hickham learned rocket science in October ...


1

If you don't push particularly hard, it's unlikely to do any damage: either she will be interested in it and read it, or she will not and she will ignore it. I bought my nephew (then 7) a copy of D'aulaires Book of Norse Myths, a fairly advanced book of Norse mythology; he didn't think it was interesting at first, but then randomly read a bit, realized it ...


4

According to my experience, you will not "put her off" if you remember a few pointers: Any material, whether educational or otherwise, should be treated as an offer, not an obligation. Offer to read with her, but do not push her. Usually it's the "encouragement" that puts the child off, not the difficulty. The level should roughly match the developmental ...


1

It sounds like he needs drills, and if he thinks he's bad at it the drills need to be fun. We have some tablet math drill games that our kids (7 & 8) really like. Ours are Lakeshore Learning, but you can check out TuxMath and GCompris (for Linux) or ask the teacher for suggestions. Our kids are not way behind but they need some more support. We have ...


1

It's tough not to speak the language of your child's school instruction. But there is a very helpful tool out there! Dutch speaking kids have the possibility to use rekentuin, or 'calculating garden' for learning basic mathematical operations. It's made like a game, you have four flowers (one for each operation) and as you answer questions, the flowers grow. ...


1

I don't know what the school system is like where you are, but I suggest talking to the school and finding out if there are ways he can be taught different approaches to math - whether that means a different teacher who has a different approach, or some outside help. Math is very hard to learn if you're not taught in a way that makes sense to you, and ...


-1

I was given consequences. He doesn't lack the ability to focus, he lacks motivation and self control to stick with it while he learns. Consequences motivate. Now, the consequences kept me motivated out of fear. I still am. I also had a whole lot of them. Maybe he just needs a few. The biggest hurdle I had to overcome was staying focused on working at ...


7

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...



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