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27

If she's asking you which bits need work and why, that's a sign she's open to criticism, and that she trusts you to provide it. The thing about criticizing creative work is you want to be as specific as possible. "This part needs rewriting" is a completely useless criticism. If she knew how to rewrite it better, chances are she would have already done it. ...


24

You should also consider that 2-year-olds often don't react as expected when quizzed. My son (almost 3) is pretty intelligent for his age, but if I ask him what he did today, no matter what we did, he "played cars and trains". If I ask him what he had for lunch, it was "macaroni and cheese". He seems to find an answer that is a valid answer sometimes, and ...


23

First off, in terms of helping the child learn: Many/most schools have computer clubs. Encourage the child to inquire from other students, or ask the school professionals yourself. This will place the child with his peers developmentally, which is the biggest encouragement you can give. Talk to a computer teacher in the school if one exists. They may agree ...


19

I think perhaps you should re-assess what your expectations should be for an 8 year old both in writing quality and in capacity for taking criticism. I know few, if any 8 year olds who can take criticism in the way some adults can, and fewer still who have any self-criticism at all. There can be a significant difference in quality between what kids produce ...


18

I meet people at local meetups. Where I live there are about three Python meetups a month. My experiences have been great: excellent programmers who just like to talk shop. While you will likely meet others at your skill level, you won't meet people at your age level. It will mostly be older people (e.g. college age or higher), but if the goal is to talk ...


13

I'm 15, and I had this same problem about a year ago. There's an awesome community called HS Hackers on Facebook. To call it lifechanging would be a gross understatement. Hackathons are the best way to meet other talented (and often young) programmers. Hackathons are basically coding marathons. The best event to go to would be a CodeDay. It's a 24 hour ...


12

Color is a difficult thing to teach . . . they don't know that you're talking about a quality rather than an object. Kid: "Hey, just a moment ago, they told me that was an elephant, and now it's a grey. I'm so confused." My daughter got it all at once when we were driving at night. The traffic lights had no visible structure beyond a circle of light. ...


12

A couple of things to add to user3143's excellent answer: Tools. Tools are not a substitute for experience or knowledge, but every craftsman/woman appreciates good tools, and they are something that you as a non-programming parent can help with. Some of the best are free, but if the kid wants an IDE, library, program, etc that costs any reasonable amount of ...


11

It's normal, and you're expecting too much. Colors are hard, for a variety of reasons explained in this article: Colors are not a thing like a "ball" or a "dog", but a property of a thing Colors are societal construct interpreted differently in different languages, with lots of gray areas even within a language (is that particular shade red or orange?) ...


10

I do not want to say that you are out-of-luck, but you are pretty much out-of-luck. The issue is that most people around your age do not know those languages. In fact, most people around your age likely do not even know what most of them are. If you asked most 14-year olds what Vim or LaTeX is, many of them would have no clue at all. Some might know what ...


8

I've decided to share a few things we do right now which seem to be interesting and fun and (I think) help her develop (or at least don't slow her development:). Just an explaination: I write her all the time because I have a daughter. At this age it doesn't change much for boys I guess. Indoors Activities with children's books There are many books for ...


8

Go to a hackerspace. They are everywhere in the world, and they are places where 'hackers' meet, in the sense of good-willing computer experts. It's mostly adults, but if you are lucky there are also some teens. There are plenty of projects to work on, such as programming software, 3D printers, soldering, etc. And other people can participate in your ...


7

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...


7

I'm currently one year below your age, and I've been programming since I was eight years old. I currently hold knowledge in PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery and Java mainly although I have little knowledge in other languages, too. Being in your position, it's not usual that you find somebody who is our age with our knowledge levels. Usually, I find ...


6

I was once in a similar position. I was a pre-teen who was eager to learn about programming and I was exhilarated by watching a computer execute commands as I instructed. I wasn't interested in web development, rather I was initially interested in quite the opposite: hacking/exploiting. Nonetheless, I believe my experience with learning to program will be ...


6

As a programmer and to some extent being 'that kid' myself I'd say that things like (cheap) embedded hardware kits such as the Raspberry Pi or Arduino are the way to go. These kits are usually quite cheap (the Pi is around $30 and is powered by a phone charger). Young programmers are not interested in getting a proper grasp of programming concepts like ...


6

Contact your local library. It is part of a library's mission to promote education, to facilitate knowledge creation, and to foster a sense of community. They run interest groups of all kinds, and if your local library is large enough, they will likely even have a tech guru of some kind on staff. If you can get a group started in the library, you have the ...


5

There's no reason you can't tie other activities to his interests to help him diversify but still enjoy his object of fascination. "Let's draw a picture of a truck". "lets build roads out of playdoh for your playdoh Diggin Rigs". "Let's build a garage for your trucks out of duplos". "Should we put on construction hats/costumes and pretend play we are ...


5

Maybe you should ask her teacher how she takes criticism in the classroom, if you can find a teacher that gives the student feedback these days. Personally I like to ask questions: "Do you think it would sound better if you did ........ " or "What if we put that sentence over here, read that do you like how that sounds? " Also try to get her asking ...


5

Two caveats: I'm not a parent. I know nothing about raising kids. (But I do know about geeks.) I'm not sure if the question was aimed at meeting people your age, or any age. I'm assuming you are open to meeting and interacting with older teens and adults. Elevator Pitch Having truly productive programming skills at your age is unusual. More common is to ...


4

Pick the colors you want to teach. Get some magnetic fridge magnets in that color. Let's say they are dog shaped Put them on the Fridge Tell him to go get the 'Red dog' If he comes back with the red one, praise him, throw him up in the air, hug em. Say "Yes, this one is Red!." "Now go get me the blue Dog"... Rinse repeat. If he comes back with the ...


4

I know it's hard to have your daughter pitching a fit at tummy time, and all you want is to keep her happy and let her learn, but let her fuss. The frustration of tummy time actually encouraged both of mine to start crawling. Think of it this way; by having her do tummy time, even if she's not a fan, you're encouraging her to find a way to either make it ...


4

According to my experience, you will not "put her off" if you remember a few pointers: Any material, whether educational or otherwise, should be treated as an offer, not an obligation. Offer to read with her, but do not push her. Usually it's the "encouragement" that puts the child off, not the difficulty. The level should roughly match the developmental ...


4

Having learned software development myself in much the same way (although in the early 90s there was a lot less useful material readily available online and so I found/bought books as my primary source of info), I can say that the most important thing the kid needs he already seems to have: Motivation to learn. The other answers here offer good suggestions, ...


4

Folks have already added some great suggestions. The only thing I can add would be to find something that he already likes doing, that programming would give him a competitive advantage in. For example, if he likes video games and knowing how to code means he could mod his system or software (yes I know this could lead to cheating) to give him an ...


4

Never forget that there are two goals, which may sometimes conflict. Have fun programming Become a great software developer Keep those two in mind, because if you make decisions without being conscious about which of the two you are prioritizing, you may not get the right balance. Always prioritizing the same over the other won't turn out well. Somebody ...


3

Do like my stepfather did with my stepbrother: Requirements: 1 bag of M & M's or similar colored treats. A little patience Now, tell your child they will get the M&M's they correctly identify the color of. In your case, it will turn out like this: "Green, green, green, green....... Red? Yellow? Blue? Blue, blue, blue, blue...... Red? Yellow? ...


3

My suggestion for 1 year old play is to take them outside. Bring them to a park or outside environment every day, in all weather. Let them get dirty, hot and cold, muddy and dusty. This will stimulate their entire body which will stimulate their mind. Outside play also stimulates their immune system letting them encounter bacteria that are abundant and ...


3

I agree with all the answers above, and I just wanted to amplify the point that this issue has almost nothing with your daughter, or poetry, or writing or even children in general. All people of all ages when they are in the early stages of attempting to master some new task are looking - nay, craving - positive reinforcement, and they don't really care if ...



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