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24

You should also consider that 2-year-olds often don't react as expected when quizzed. My son (almost 3) is pretty intelligent for his age, but if I ask him what he did today, no matter what we did, he "played cars and trains". If I ask him what he had for lunch, it was "macaroni and cheese". He seems to find an answer that is a valid answer sometimes, and ...


12

Color is a difficult thing to teach . . . they don't know that you're talking about a quality rather than an object. Kid: "Hey, just a moment ago, they told me that was an elephant, and now it's a grey. I'm so confused." My daughter got it all at once when we were driving at night. The traffic lights had no visible structure beyond a circle of light. ...


11

It's normal, and you're expecting too much. Colors are hard, for a variety of reasons explained in this article: Colors are not a thing like a "ball" or a "dog", but a property of a thing Colors are societal construct interpreted differently in different languages, with lots of gray areas even within a language (is that particular shade red or orange?) ...


9

Okay (takes a deep breath), I'll share... I have no data for when kids are old enough to talk to them about racism, slavery, and the Jim Crow laws that were in effect for so many decades afterwards. I can tell you what I wanted for my child, which was that she be old enough not only to understand why these things were wrong, but also to understand the ...


8

I have had some success (in an unpaid, friend of the family or parent of the child's friend kind of way) with the following approach: Stop referring to them, even inside your own head as lazy-to-think. While that is one possible explanation for them not answering, or blurting out any old number without working it out first, there are plenty of others: they ...


8

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


7

That sounds like a normal six year old. Certainly I'd expect the same from my daughter and her peers. At that age it's quite a big task for them to follow a story, dialogue and images in enough detail to be able to recall them afterwards. That's partly why they can quite happily watch the same TV programme/film repeatedly, it takes them a few repeats to ...


7

Unfortunately college admission is a very confusing and opaque process which is quite different for any individual college so this is almost impossible to answer in general (assuming you are talking about college in the US). I would recommend creating a list of colleges that you are interested, go there, view the campus, and talk directly to an admissions ...


6

I think that home-school could be advantageous because my GPA would not carry over. I hate to break it to you, but colleges will almost certainly want to consider your entire high school GPA, and request a transcript from both your parents and the school you previously attended. Homeschooling for one semester doesn't "erase" the rest of your academic ...


6

Chrys' Answer covers most of the ground I was going to, but one suggestion might be gamification. From what you've said, some children see no value in going beyond basic maths, and while you might be able to convince them that those jobs they plan for require maths (good luck being a householder who can't balance a monthly budget), that's not always valid, ...


5

The solution is in your question : some of them also early decide that they will be artists, dancers, athletes, house-wives, etc so they don't need mathematics. Involve their goal/hobbies/interests in your teaching. There is a high level of opportunity there. Applied mathematics are probably the key for most people having issues with formal ...


5

"We are visual creatures and we have to have pictures, not just text, to help us visualize things." I'd be a bit careful about that idea. Not everyone thinks the same way. In fact, people have a variety of learning styles, and most people find that one or two styles of learning may be more effective for them than others. You may want to suggest a variety ...


5

There's no reason you can't tie other activities to his interests to help him diversify but still enjoy his object of fascination. "Let's draw a picture of a truck". "lets build roads out of playdoh for your playdoh Diggin Rigs". "Let's build a garage for your trucks out of duplos". "Should we put on construction hats/costumes and pretend play we are ...


4

Sounds like my 5 1/2 year old, too! And I will echo James Snell in that it seems like it's a pretty normal 5/6 year old thing. My son could watch the same episode of Octonauts or whatever a thousand times and pick up new stuff each time he watches it. I can remember being 6ish years old and vividly remembering certain dialogue or scenes in a movie, only ...


4

I am writing this assuming you are in the US. I have no idea what educational entrance requirements exist for homeschooled students elsewhere in the world. As a public and private high school teacher, it is my understanding that even homeschool parents must submit a "transcript" of sorts to colleges their children are applying to. A quick search online ...


4

Pick the colors you want to teach. Get some magnetic fridge magnets in that color. Let's say they are dog shaped Put them on the Fridge Tell him to go get the 'Red dog' If he comes back with the red one, praise him, throw him up in the air, hug em. Say "Yes, this one is Red!." "Now go get me the blue Dog"... Rinse repeat. If he comes back with the ...


4

I know it's hard to have your daughter pitching a fit at tummy time, and all you want is to keep her happy and let her learn, but let her fuss. The frustration of tummy time actually encouraged both of mine to start crawling. Think of it this way; by having her do tummy time, even if she's not a fan, you're encouraging her to find a way to either make it ...


3

First, I think kids knowing that life isn't always fair and hasn't always been fair for all is actually a good thing (in my experience, it helps keep us reminded of why we should be grateful - so I would introduce this as a concept even to the littlest one. However, young kids need to be left with a sense of hope in order for these kinds of lessons to build ...


3

Many math teachers fall into the trap to teaching only the procedural knowledge of math--that is, they get so wrapped up in teaching the steps to successfully work the problem that they forget to teach their students the declarative knowledge of math--the WHY they need to be able to do math. As balanced mama said, the more you can incorporate real life and ...


3

Do like my stepfather did with my stepbrother: Requirements: 1 bag of M & M's or similar colored treats. A little patience Now, tell your child they will get the M&M's they correctly identify the color of. In your case, it will turn out like this: "Green, green, green, green....... Red? Yellow? Blue? Blue, blue, blue, blue...... Red? Yellow? ...


3

Is it worth reversing the question back onto yourself... asking yourself "Why am I so lazy at teaching?" That's not to say you are lazy, but being good at a subject and being good at teaching it aren't even the same ballpark. So what are your roadblocks to getting through to them. At ages 12-15 they're starting to enter the adult world and in a private ...


3

I have researched and researched and researched looking for any associations between starting piano too young and heart complications. I have found nothing. While that's not dismissing the claim since I have no evidence either way, it does sounds rather unreasonable. I was able to find personal stories of playing piano and problems with pain. One man I ...


2

Here's the reason I upped Valkyrie's answer (for "more conversation, please"), when there were so many good ones: My daughter went through a several-month "what would happen if...?" stage before she entered her "Why?" stage. (Silly me, I thought we were doing the first instead of the second, but we ended up doing both.) I was sort of enjoying both ...


2

As a proponent of Home-education and a former classroom educator and advisor, I'll chime in on advising that switching now is probably not the time (sorry). Instead, I would focus on getting your GPA up and figuring out how to explain the earlier low GPA in an "exceptions" essay. Even if you started homeschooling now and got a 4.0 (With clear proof a 4.0 ...


2

One huge things that a lot of parents I have in my mother group don't realise is that children have multiple phrases, sentences and words that are new to them every day. Sometimes this may be a little confusing and sometimes instructions can be confused with others as they may be smart, yes, but their IQ does not determine their processing rate. My tip ...


2

I read about a study that seems to imply that certain colors are easier to understand than others. They tracked primitive cultures' names for colors and found a natural sequence: Though I haven't seen this applied specifically to parenting, it does seem to imply that a child would be best served by learning light-dark distinction first, then learn to ...


2

The difficulty for the child to understand is that colors are something abstract, so something they cannot take into their hands and play with. But at this age touching something is an important factor in learning. An idea would be to get colored plastic sheets (yellow, magenta, cyan) and show them what happens when you look through them. This allows your ...


2

I think you will find the month by month outline on American Pregnancy Helpful because it goes over the major developments you can expect in a very clear and precise way for the first year. The list includes motor skills as well as others (such as social) but since the most noticeable and "measured" developments that occur during the first year are ...


2

Tummy time is not explicitly 'learn to crawl' time. It is a combination of several things. Building strength and balance Increasing activity Getting the baby used to different positions Usually is more active than back-time Improve head shape (avoiding 'flat head') Certainly give her toys during this period. Don't push crawling very hard; she'll do ...


2

One of the hardest things for me to learn when my son was your daughter's age was "be less helpful." He didn't have too much need to crawl because he'd reach for things outside his grasp and we'd get them for him. That said, he simply was not much of a crawler, ever. He was pulling himself up on things and traveling before average but didn't "army crawl." ...



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