Hot answers tagged

25

It's a common issue at around that age, both ours had issues with '6' for some reason and skipped from 5 to 7 and the younger one later got stuck with '13' for a short while. The best thing to do is practice with them and they will get there. Practicing counting as a song / rhyme (like 1-2 buckle my shoe) is one good way to help them to remember the ...


10

Rather than answering all her questions correctly and fully, what is important to help her develop a scientific mind is to spark her interest in the scientific method: The steps of the scientific method are to: Ask a Question Do Background Research Construct a Hypothesis Test Your Hypothesis by Doing an Experiment Analyze Your Data and ...


10

say "let's find out together". Then collect some different magnets, some magnetic and non magnetic items, something the magnetism can be transferred to (screw driver or pin). Some type of compass building items would be nice too. Metal shaving would be nice for showing the magnetic field. Then do experiments, when possible have your child guess the outcome ...


9

I'm not a child psychologist, but I've also observed this as common behavior, and my intuition is that it comes from learning the numbers as a sequence, not as having actual intrinsic meaning. I've been trying to get my kids to remember the sequence of stops on the subway line we live on for years, and there's a couple they almost always skip — mostly ...


7

Many. But which exactly greatly depends on your child and his experiences so far. Some suggestions: Death is final Really. If you are four you haven't necessarily made that experience yet. Families are smaller and live apart, neighbourhoods less connected than a few generations ago. First-hand experience with death is rare even for adults. Death is ...


7

21 months is young to truly understand waiting, but it's not too young to get a head start. Of course, this is a balancing act: teaching her to wait is a good thing, but too much waiting may make things spiral out of control. Key to teaching things like this is helping her get a complete understanding of why she is waiting, coupled with an idea of how ...


5

The first hit on google leads to this 1998 paper written for the AMA's Council on Scientific Affairs which says precisely the opposite of your psychologist friend. ...there is little evidence of widespread overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis of ADHD or of widespread overprescription of methylphenidate by physicians. In 2006, the AMA *Journal of Ethics ...


5

I doubt a child at this age is even capable of understanding that parents are fallible. It took me until my teens to realise my parents couldn't do everything. However, that's probably in part because they look up to you because they need to learn from you. But rather than trying to teach them at this age that you can't do everything, you can also use their ...


5

Don't we all sometimes struggle with this? Probably less with numbers, but certainly sometimes with the alphabet. The reason behind this is how our brain "files" data. Let's take the alphabet, for example: Haven't we all learned the Alphabet Song? Sure, that means we know all the letters but we teach and learn them as a sequence, not as individual items. ...


4

Just be yourself. Right now you can do everything at a level that she can`t, you set her rules and boundaries, so of course you're a superhero. As her abilities grow, and her cognition grows, and her sphere of what she compares you to grows - she'll eventually figure out what things you suck at, maybe sometimes even better than you do. Things her friend's ...


4

I wouldn't worry about it too much. Certainly don't make your child feel bad/stressed about it. As James said, "look for opportunities to count up to that 'missing' number". Here's something I've tried: Play a game where the tickle monster will be hiding/waiting until it hears a number. The exchange goes like this (say the troublesome number is 12): ...


4

My daughter has recently turned 4 and was raised in somewhat the same way. We speak Dutch to her, but she sees a lot of English videos and stories, so she also picks up some Dutch. She started making proper sentences shortly after she turned 3 and is currently doing quite well. She occasionally mixes English and Dutch words and understands that they mean ...


4

Your son wasn't as connected to the fish (who he couldn't touch) as he would be a puppy (who would have personality and follow your son around), so it's not surprising that he isn't upset. I would use this as a moment to teach the following: Small animals are delicate and have shorter life spans than dogs or humans. It's natural and no ones fault when ...


3

First of all, the answers by @Eric and Peter Schneider are already good. Instead of always explaining stuff by words, let the kids try to find it out as much as possible by themselves, if possible. Guide them, encourage them to try this and this, and if they claim an idea about it, let them prove it. That's just how real science works, too (without the ...


3

The first thing I'd do is read up on magnetism myself. I seem to recall that it is a relativistic effect of electric currents, but that's about it. In spite of what I said in my comment, I would try to give as good and exact an answer as I can. (Talk about atoms, electrons going in circles -- oh my, what an oversimplification....) In my experience children ...


3

The best schooling for a two year old consists of reading to him and playing with him, and taking him frequently outside to parks and play groups where he can socialize with other kids his age. At two, some of the books he might be interested in that would also be very intellectually stimulating include photo books which consist of nothing but photos of ...


3

As I go for work i will be busy in my work after reaching home. When I get time I spend the whole day with my DS. I just find it hard for the activities but I go online for the activities so that I can engage my kid and has lot of fun. I would like to share few of the activities that i do with my son. I use to play Indoor basket ball: This one of the best ...


3

Tv is not an answer. At this age the amount of TV should be very, very limited - 1 to 2 hours according to American Academy of Pediatrics - but I'd say that 1h is absolute maximum, seeing how my girl is hooked to tv, watching it with open mount and a thoughtless impression. As for other activties - here are some ideas: Our daughter loves playing with ...


3

You should not feel that you have to be supplying all of her entertainment. Between daycare and the home life you have described it sounds like your daughter never has to find her own entertainment. This is not something you want to encourage, rather she should be encouraged to learn how to entertain herself and be comfortable with her own company. This ...


3

One possibility is a Language Processing Disorder. A child with a language processing disorder may have problems with: following multi-step directions paying attention in noisy environments such as classrooms, loud parties, malls, etc following spoken directions rhyming, spelling, reading, writing (many kids have difficulty with written expression, ...


2

No, the AMA has made no such stance. I have combed the AMA's Press Releases from the last several months, with no mention of anything related to the validity of AD/HD. Historically, as outlined in user15736's answer, the AMA has been for AD/HD as a valid diagnoses, and it would be highly unusual for them to release an opposing stance. So unusual would this ...


2

https://www.khanacademy.org/ has a lot of resources. Practice problems, hints, how-to videos. There is a myriad of open source textbooks out there too. These are mostly college texts, but there are also some high school texts. There are a lot of homeschooling resources out there too.


2

It's a good opportunity to drill into her that "all people have their own strengths and weaknesses". If/when you hire people to do services, or take the car to the shop, or go to the vet's or doctor's take the opportunity to explain what those people do, and that they're better than you at those particular things. "And you will have strengths too, but ...


2

It is a good thing that your daughter thinks so highly of you -- use it as an opportunity to be a role model and exemplify the value of asking others for help. "I know how to do this because I asked _____ how to do it", "I did not do this completely on my own -- _____ did some of the work", etc. And then "You too can do just about anything if you ask the ...


2

Many pet stores have a guarantee period. In my town they all offer 7 days; if I take the fish back to the store, along with a sample of the water from the tank, they test it, determine whether the death was caused by water conditions, improper handling, or possibly a condition the fish had before purchase (and in the latter case, they offer a replacement). ...


2

What she is really asking is not details about how it works - poles, relationship to distance, etc. These are things we understand about magnetism. But what we do not understand is the nature of magnetism. Feynman concludes that he cannot tell the interviewer why magnetism works, because we still do not know why magnetism works. We know magnetic forces ...


2

Going beyond "They just do" is a bit difficult when dealing with a four-year-old. Think about some other substances with unusual properties. You can see through glass and plastic. Pumice floats in water/Helium balloons float. Mercury is liquid at room temperature. Metal bends, but glass shatters Rocks are heavy Understanding these concepts takes ...


2

I have a similarly tireless 21 month old and it can be hard to keep up with his endless energy. We also only have to take care of him on weekends as he is in daycare during the week. However I feel this time while he is small and wants to spend a lot of time with his parents will pass way too fast so when I find things a bit overwhelming I try to remind ...


2

Kids who have some sense of reason will always have a desire to exert some control over some area of their life. Especially at this age, they don't realize they want it or are doing it, but they have a drive, however small, toward some independence and control. In many kids this manifests itself in diet. They will refuse to eat certain things and ...


1

Probably no harm, but probably no benefit. At this age, the kids are learning phonetics, they are learning the inventory of different sounds. At a bit later age, they will no longer hear the sounds that are not in their language, same as adults. In one interesting study, Kuhl’s team exposed 9 month old American babies to Mandarin in various forms–in ...



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