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27

If she's asking you which bits need work and why, that's a sign she's open to criticism, and that she trusts you to provide it. The thing about criticizing creative work is you want to be as specific as possible. "This part needs rewriting" is a completely useless criticism. If she knew how to rewrite it better, chances are she would have already done it. ...


24

You should also consider that 2-year-olds often don't react as expected when quizzed. My son (almost 3) is pretty intelligent for his age, but if I ask him what he did today, no matter what we did, he "played cars and trains". If I ask him what he had for lunch, it was "macaroni and cheese". He seems to find an answer that is a valid answer sometimes, and ...


19

I think perhaps you should re-assess what your expectations should be for an 8 year old both in writing quality and in capacity for taking criticism. I know few, if any 8 year olds who can take criticism in the way some adults can, and fewer still who have any self-criticism at all. There can be a significant difference in quality between what kids produce ...


12

Color is a difficult thing to teach . . . they don't know that you're talking about a quality rather than an object. Kid: "Hey, just a moment ago, they told me that was an elephant, and now it's a grey. I'm so confused." My daughter got it all at once when we were driving at night. The traffic lights had no visible structure beyond a circle of light. ...


11

It's normal, and you're expecting too much. Colors are hard, for a variety of reasons explained in this article: Colors are not a thing like a "ball" or a "dog", but a property of a thing Colors are societal construct interpreted differently in different languages, with lots of gray areas even within a language (is that particular shade red or orange?) ...


9

Okay (takes a deep breath), I'll share... I have no data for when kids are old enough to talk to them about racism, slavery, and the Jim Crow laws that were in effect for so many decades afterwards. I can tell you what I wanted for my child, which was that she be old enough not only to understand why these things were wrong, but also to understand the ...


8

I've decided to share a few things we do right now which seem to be interesting and fun and (I think) help her develop (or at least don't slow her development:). Just an explaination: I write her all the time because I have a daughter. At this age it doesn't change much for boys I guess. Indoors Activities with children's books There are many books for ...


7

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...


5

There's no reason you can't tie other activities to his interests to help him diversify but still enjoy his object of fascination. "Let's draw a picture of a truck". "lets build roads out of playdoh for your playdoh Diggin Rigs". "Let's build a garage for your trucks out of duplos". "Should we put on construction hats/costumes and pretend play we are ...


5

Maybe you should ask her teacher how she takes criticism in the classroom, if you can find a teacher that gives the student feedback these days. Personally I like to ask questions: "Do you think it would sound better if you did ........ " or "What if we put that sentence over here, read that do you like how that sounds? " Also try to get her asking ...


4

Pick the colors you want to teach. Get some magnetic fridge magnets in that color. Let's say they are dog shaped Put them on the Fridge Tell him to go get the 'Red dog' If he comes back with the red one, praise him, throw him up in the air, hug em. Say "Yes, this one is Red!." "Now go get me the blue Dog"... Rinse repeat. If he comes back with the ...


4

I know it's hard to have your daughter pitching a fit at tummy time, and all you want is to keep her happy and let her learn, but let her fuss. The frustration of tummy time actually encouraged both of mine to start crawling. Think of it this way; by having her do tummy time, even if she's not a fan, you're encouraging her to find a way to either make it ...


4

According to my experience, you will not "put her off" if you remember a few pointers: Any material, whether educational or otherwise, should be treated as an offer, not an obligation. Offer to read with her, but do not push her. Usually it's the "encouragement" that puts the child off, not the difficulty. The level should roughly match the developmental ...


3

I agree with all the answers above, and I just wanted to amplify the point that this issue has almost nothing with your daughter, or poetry, or writing or even children in general. All people of all ages when they are in the early stages of attempting to master some new task are looking - nay, craving - positive reinforcement, and they don't really care if ...


3

I have researched and researched and researched looking for any associations between starting piano too young and heart complications. I have found nothing. While that's not dismissing the claim since I have no evidence either way, it does sounds rather unreasonable. I was able to find personal stories of playing piano and problems with pain. One man I ...


3

Do like my stepfather did with my stepbrother: Requirements: 1 bag of M & M's or similar colored treats. A little patience Now, tell your child they will get the M&M's they correctly identify the color of. In your case, it will turn out like this: "Green, green, green, green....... Red? Yellow? Blue? Blue, blue, blue, blue...... Red? Yellow? ...


3

First, I think kids knowing that life isn't always fair and hasn't always been fair for all is actually a good thing (in my experience, it helps keep us reminded of why we should be grateful - so I would introduce this as a concept even to the littlest one. However, young kids need to be left with a sense of hope in order for these kinds of lessons to build ...


3

My suggestion for 1 year old play is to take them outside. Bring them to a park or outside environment every day, in all weather. Let them get dirty, hot and cold, muddy and dusty. This will stimulate their entire body which will stimulate their mind. Outside play also stimulates their immune system letting them encounter bacteria that are abundant and ...


2

One huge things that a lot of parents I have in my mother group don't realise is that children have multiple phrases, sentences and words that are new to them every day. Sometimes this may be a little confusing and sometimes instructions can be confused with others as they may be smart, yes, but their IQ does not determine their processing rate. My tip ...


2

I think you will find the month by month outline on American Pregnancy Helpful because it goes over the major developments you can expect in a very clear and precise way for the first year. The list includes motor skills as well as others (such as social) but since the most noticeable and "measured" developments that occur during the first year are ...


2

I read about a study that seems to imply that certain colors are easier to understand than others. They tracked primitive cultures' names for colors and found a natural sequence: Though I haven't seen this applied specifically to parenting, it does seem to imply that a child would be best served by learning light-dark distinction first, then learn to ...


2

The difficulty for the child to understand is that colors are something abstract, so something they cannot take into their hands and play with. But at this age touching something is an important factor in learning. An idea would be to get colored plastic sheets (yellow, magenta, cyan) and show them what happens when you look through them. This allows your ...


2

"Safe" as in not harmful? Of course. Assuming you're not hurting her, there's minimal risk of physical harm in "forced crawling" around (don't step on her). When babies do crawl, they really slam their limbs into the floor, and they very often fall down. It's good to note that your baby's kneecaps are not bone, yet. They are cartilage, so there's a much ...


2

Crawling is a motor development skill that develops naturally on each child's own developmental time table. Barring any severe physical or neurological disabilities, there is no need whatsoever to "teach" or "encourage" a child to crawl. Other than giving them ample safe space in which to explore, respect their stage of development (whatever that is), and ...


2

One of the hardest things for me to learn when my son was your daughter's age was "be less helpful." He didn't have too much need to crawl because he'd reach for things outside his grasp and we'd get them for him. That said, he simply was not much of a crawler, ever. He was pulling himself up on things and traveling before average but didn't "army crawl." ...


2

Tummy time is not explicitly 'learn to crawl' time. It is a combination of several things. Building strength and balance Increasing activity Getting the baby used to different positions Usually is more active than back-time Improve head shape (avoiding 'flat head') Certainly give her toys during this period. Don't push crawling very hard; she'll do ...


2

I agree with taking children outside, they learn so much by exploring nature and the surrounding environment. As a parent of teenagers, we did so many early activities related to reading - one thing I wished I'd done more is playing games to develop early MATH skills. Here are some ideas: One type of toy that seems really simple but are important ...


1

I remember my experience of when I was having writing classes on the school pretty well. When the teacher made critics to my text, it was often impossible to turn the critics into something practical for my text. Frustration then emerged on me, and I hated writing. Text writing, I believe, is one of the fields where critics are most often useless for ...


1

I think you're overthinking (smile). You are already supplying some diversity (reading, outside play, and daycare which will eventually be replaced with school). I am sure you have other toys and activities available in your house for him to choose from, but he is choosing what he enjoys, what interests him, what gives him comfort. Others have suggested this ...


1

Forced anything is not good for your child. Or for your spouse or colleague or anyone else. If you want more specific feedback, I can give you a child physiotherapeutist's opinion: Don't do it. Let him/her do what he/she feels like doing. No forced crawling, walking or anything, that creates bad movement habbits which take real hard work to fix years ...



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