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42

I'm probably going to experience this situation pretty soon, too. One very interesting idea I've picked up a long time ago is not to accept a short "why" but encourage a full-sentence question. Requiring a full sentence forces the child to actually think about the topic before asking. What is the topic? What do I want to know? How can I phrase that? This ...


30

I usually respond to endless 'why's with questions that focus on critical thinking. "Do you want french toast or pancakes for breakfast?" "Why?" "Well, which do you think would make your tummy happier?" "Why?" "We eat because we want happy bodies and happy tummies..." and at least with my two, it eventually winds down. Or maybe my questions overload their ...


27

If she's asking you which bits need work and why, that's a sign she's open to criticism, and that she trusts you to provide it. The thing about criticizing creative work is you want to be as specific as possible. "This part needs rewriting" is a completely useless criticism. If she knew how to rewrite it better, chances are she would have already done it. ...


24

You should also consider that 2-year-olds often don't react as expected when quizzed. My son (almost 3) is pretty intelligent for his age, but if I ask him what he did today, no matter what we did, he "played cars and trains". If I ask him what he had for lunch, it was "macaroni and cheese". He seems to find an answer that is a valid answer sometimes, and ...


21

I love the answers I've gotten so far, but I thought I might as well chime in and describe what I have been doing, since its a little... different. Generally, I try to answer his questions as best I can... within reason. Many of his questions I can answer fairly clearly, and do so (e.g. Q:"why [is the kitty afraid of me]?" A:"because you're much bigger ...


19

I think perhaps you should re-assess what your expectations should be for an 8 year old both in writing quality and in capacity for taking criticism. I know few, if any 8 year olds who can take criticism in the way some adults can, and fewer still who have any self-criticism at all. There can be a significant difference in quality between what kids produce ...


14

As a programmer i would propose to you the following: Abstract thinking, Pragmatic Thinking, Higher problem solving. Design Patterns ( Not programming in general but building. Building in sense of building, construction. Did you know that design patterns come from designing buildings and problem solving in engineering? ) Also i would recommend starting ...


12

If you are asking the question, then that's all that matters. The act of asking the question implies that you care how you are doing as a parent and that means you're likely the best parent you can be already. So don't sweat it. Enjoy the kids.


12

A few years ago, a study was done on students that observed student response to how they were praised about their school work. The study found that students who were praised with phrases like, "You're so smart!" or "Look how clever you are!" were more likely to give up when confronted with a problem that they found difficult. Students who were praised ...


12

Although I have no personal experience with the 'why' phase yet, I imagine that the occasional: "What do you think?" thrown back at him would give you a few seconds to catch your breath. More importantly, it could give you a lot of insight into how your child perceives the world, and what type of answer from you would be meaningful for him. However, I don't ...


12

Color is a difficult thing to teach . . . they don't know that you're talking about a quality rather than an object. Kid: "Hey, just a moment ago, they told me that was an elephant, and now it's a grey. I'm so confused." My daughter got it all at once when we were driving at night. The traffic lights had no visible structure beyond a circle of light. ...


11

I started when I was 6 or so—I didn't have any particular pre-requisites, I just liked exploring (especially on the computer!). I actually found QBASIC on the computer myself, had no idea what it did or how to work it, and asked my father—I had no idea it was to do with "programming" or what that was—but he just showed me how you could tell the computer to ...


11

Giving up is not necessarily a bad thing, providing you are giving up on a certain approach to a problem, and not the problem altogether. Knowing when to give up, and figuring out what to try next instead are important problem solving skills. In other words, if you've been sitting there staring at a math problem for 10 minutes without success, chances are ...


11

It's normal, and you're expecting too much. Colors are hard, for a variety of reasons explained in this article: Colors are not a thing like a "ball" or a "dog", but a property of a thing Colors are societal construct interpreted differently in different languages, with lots of gray areas even within a language (is that particular shade red or orange?) ...


10

No, a child will not teach themselves to develop a new "language" to express themselves, at least not by any generally accepted definition of the term "language". Language is a complex tool used by multiple people or a community. A single child who is never exposed to verbal language does not make up their own... what would be the point if no one ...


9

I am not a pedagogue, but I've been told children in their early years can comprehend numbers which are the same of their age. Two year old's can comprehend two, Three year old's can comprehend three, and so on... Counting to ten is not the same. That is more like reciting a nursery rhyme. My daughter of two and a half can count to ten, in that manner. She ...


9

As Erin's answer mentioned, there are different types of learners, with different strengths. It was focused on the book-based learning - I will try to give a broader perspective. Hope you will find some useful bits in it :-) There are different types of intelligence, according to Howard Gardner. And traditional schools only focus on visual and verbal ...


9

Part of it is curiosity, but kids also take a lot of pleasure in controlling their parents. It's only fair, I guess. After a certain point, they're just pushing their boundaries to see how far they can take it, and it becomes a game rather than a learning opportunity. After you recognize it has turned into a game, you can either play along or just say ...


9

Okay (takes a deep breath), I'll share... I have no data for when kids are old enough to talk to them about racism, slavery, and the Jim Crow laws that were in effect for so many decades afterwards. I can tell you what I wanted for my child, which was that she be old enough not only to understand why these things were wrong, but also to understand the ...


8

The best way to teach kids vocabulary is to talk to them all the time. When you go to the store, tell them what you are doing, what you need to find, name produce, etc. Just fill their brains with as many words as possible and let them sort it out. They will surprise you when they name a papaya or asparagus by site at the store. We have used flash cards ...


8

We have always talked to our daughter as if she were an adult. It was rare that we would use baby words, though we would dumb things down a little in her earlier years (she is now 9). You soon grasp a child's vocabulary, so the first few times you use a new word with the child you need to explain it. It is the same with expressions - yesterday I was ...


8

Maybe it would be easier for him to grasp the basic concepts, through some programming/educational games. Some of them are: Kodu A visual programming language made specifically for creating games. Accessible for children and enjoyable for anyone." Kinderlogo Kinderlogo is an adaptation of Logo for young children, offering Logo's stimulating ...


8

The distinction here, as you've noticed, is between setting goals and applying pressure. The difference is whether the focus is on the behaviour of your child or of the centre towards your child. From the centre's perspective, I suspect they're simply trying to figure out what you, their clients, want from them. For example, I would like my daughter to be ...


8

You could do almost anything, but I think you should set yourself some ground rules. Obviously you don't want to put your baby into any kind of potentially harmful situation. You want to avoid any experiments that cause undue stress... no witholding of food, sleep, or affection, no stress testing their capacity for discomfort, etc. So what can you do? I ...


8

This is the "forbidden experiment"-- linguist wish they new more about this because it has implications for other questions. But doing this to children is barbaric child abuse. So we wait for natural experiments to arise. The best documented ones are the ones Beofett covered, so I won't repeat that part. The cases of feral children and children locked up ...


8

I have had some success (in an unpaid, friend of the family or parent of the child's friend kind of way) with the following approach: Stop referring to them, even inside your own head as lazy-to-think. While that is one possible explanation for them not answering, or blurting out any old number without working it out first, there are plenty of others: they ...


8

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


7

When they show an interest I did Latin for one year at school, aged 13. I can whole-heartedly say that it has helped immensely through other education, not because those subjects use Latin, but because the 'lingo-lego' nature of Latin helps you to analyse/deconstruct other words, phrases and languages. It helped with my Mathematics, Computing, French and ...


7

If it were one of my children, I would absolutely seek the advice of a medical professional. All the school specialists have been able to tell you is that her short term memory is not functioning properly, but they have not told you why and they won't be able to. A neurologist should be able to help you understand better what is going on with your ...


7

It sounds like you're doing all the right things. Just keep it up! Every child starts talking at their own pace. 15 months without any words is a bit behind the milestone (2-3 words by 1 year is the normal milestone), but missing a milestone is absolutely no cause for worry. It is only when you see a pattern of missing multiple milestones that you should ...



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