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7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


4

I'm assuming that the parent does understand? So the tactic features a lie as its central feature. And the lesson this is supposed to teach the kid is... what, exactly? Lie and be stubborn to get your way? I would consider imparting that lesson to be a major downside to this approach. An example of a more constructive approach might be to actually treat ...


3

Peers count for a lot. You can expect them to talk like their peers. Ref. In Raising Bebe, the author had a funny story about her toddler learning to cuss (with French toddler cuss words) from her peers at pre-school. Modeling counts, while you can not expect them to understand immediately which contexts to use whqt, they will eventually use the right ...


2

Unless your daughter is learning disabled, all children have very good (mind bogglingly fantastic) language acquisitions skills-- in particular they can learn a language by mere exposure, which doesn't work for adults. Adults can be said to have a knack for picking up a 2nd or 3rd language-- usually not, adults study for years and still are incompetent--, ...


2

You are all missing out! AUDIOBOOKS! We all spend time in the car, we all need to concentrate on driving... Get audiobooks in the languages that your kid needs more exposure too. It turns out their language skills develop further if they hear the same language in several voices, rather than just your own...


2

The user "Matt" posts an argument that your children are not speaking German because they do not like to speak it, but rather that they are not completely fluent in it. I'd actually like to offer a counter argument to that: I myself was raised with four languages, and have since observed my mother raise another child with the same languages. I'm also raising ...


1

I'd say YES too, even if your child don't really need it. My chidren are all bilingual: we live in an english-speaking country, they speak English at school and, well, everywhere ; but at home we speak French, that's the rule. If you want to teach him that other language, then really use it, giving him a lesson once a while in that language wouldn't do ...


1

In my experience and opinion, the downsides to the approach of refusing to respond if the child speaks in the native tongue instead of the desired language, is the confusion of the role and abilities of the parent. The parent's job is to raise a human who can communicate effectively and directly, without relying on manipulation and subterfuge to reach his ...


1

Well if you want your daughter to accelerate her english and an immersion school would help her learn at her own pace isn't that by definition the incorrect choice? If you want her to catch up in English then I do think a great standard school would work, you could also get her to a speech therapist. I am not sure what a French immersion school is, were ...


1

I started my son at age 8, but wish I had done it earlier as it would have been even easier for him. He lapped it up, we were home edding at the time so I could choose exactly which lessons he did and how long we spent on each and when we did them, so I could cater for when he didn't feel like it. He then went to prep school in the UK for five terms, ...


1

Being multilingual myself, I feel discomfort at speaking to someone in a language I know doesn't "fit". For example, my dad is Italian, but my brother and I were born and lived in Argentina. We always spoke Spanish at home, but always Italian with my grandparents (his parents). We effectively learned Italian that way. In my adolescence, my dad started ...


1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...



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