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10

Based on the information from this site children are usually able to answer simple questions (like the example you have given) by the time they reach 3. At 2.5 years most children are able to answer most yes/no questions. You can also find hints how to improve your child's answering skills. Remember that each child is different. One may start doing ...


10

You know your kid best. I personally vote for trust every time, because it was a big deal to ME when I was a kid when my parents trusted me enough to confide something like this in me. "I know you are mature enough not to use this word in your everyday language, so I'll tell you what it is and why people use it, and why we choose NOT to use it." Also, you ...


8

My experience tells me you should both speak your native tongue at home, and you can throw in some English along the way just for variety. You know how you can tell Chinese from Spanish, even if you speak neither? Children up to at least 7 years of age are incredibly good at telling languages apart - even languages they don't speak. Children can learn a ...


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


6

Parents dramatically overestimate the risk of not learning the community language, especially if you are in the US. In my family alone, over 7 languages have died in the last 3 or 4 generations (German, Russian, Swedish, French, Cherokee, Dutch, Polish). There has never been a case of a child born in the US failing to learn English from the community. My ...


4

I'm assuming that the parent does understand? So the tactic features a lie as its central feature. And the lesson this is supposed to teach the kid is... what, exactly? Lie and be stubborn to get your way? I would consider imparting that lesson to be a major downside to this approach. An example of a more constructive approach might be to actually treat ...


4

One technique we were taught, that has helped me (but still has a long way to go, as I always talk too fast when presenting - just look at any of the videos of me online) is to treat full stops as breaths. Every time you hit a full stop, breathe. A full breath. This forces you to slow down, and it helps your thought processes. It works for kids - since I ...


4

Honestly, you are already doing most of what can be done about it, and even this tip isn't likely to make things a whole lot better. This is a common problem with this age group and up through the teen years. The best answer I found was to do what you are doing really - but consistently and refuse to understand when she doesn't slow down. Since she ...


4

I don't think your boy needs counseling based on my observations of my boys and their interactions with the other kids on the block. They are always "killing" something. Not literally. Not so much my oldest, but even he is oblivious to it, which supports your theory that it's the teachers that are upset by it. I had an incident last year where my boy and his ...


3

As Michael Thompson (child psychologist and author of several great books on raising boys and their emotional development) likes to say (I'm paraphrasing), kids know the difference between real violence and play, and we lose credibility with them when we act like we cannot tell the difference. If you're playing a game where you're pretending to be assassins ...


3

Peers count for a lot. You can expect them to talk like their peers. Ref. In Raising Bebe, the author had a funny story about her toddler learning to cuss (with French toddler cuss words) from her peers at pre-school. Modeling counts, while you can not expect them to understand immediately which contexts to use whqt, they will eventually use the right ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


3

I was raised in a solely Spanish speaking home in the U.S. and have friends that come from English and Spanish speaking homes watching their sibling that only responded in English to their parents Spanish commands really hindered their ability and comfort speaking the language as they got older. I highly suggest insisting your child respond to you in Danish ...


3

We have always allowed swearing, openly and uncensored, in our household, with the exception of racial slurs or sexual choice words ("gay"). Those are taboo. We also don't allow swear words to be used to hurt or demean others (I.e. In an argumentative context). Beyond that, used as expletives or emphasis, we have always allowed our kids to use them freely, ...


2

Any answer would only be an opinion, Learning English would be a good skill to have and would make it easier for her daughter on such occasions. But i don't see why it should make any difference, Speaking English does not make them any better than someone who cant speak English and her mother shouldn't have to learn another language just so her daughter will ...


1

I'd say YES too, even if your child don't really need it. My chidren are all bilingual: we live in an english-speaking country, they speak English at school and, well, everywhere ; but at home we speak French, that's the rule. If you want to teach him that other language, then really use it, giving him a lesson once a while in that language wouldn't do ...


1

In my experience and opinion, the downsides to the approach of refusing to respond if the child speaks in the native tongue instead of the desired language, is the confusion of the role and abilities of the parent. The parent's job is to raise a human who can communicate effectively and directly, without relying on manipulation and subterfuge to reach his ...


1

Once she is old enough (depending on where you are, this is likely between 7th and 9th grades), enroll her in Speech and Debate. In Debate, talking fast is a big plus - but talking fast AND being understandable is absolutely crucial; and in other variants of speech, clarity and enunciation is very important. On top of that, it can be pretty fun, especially ...


1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...


1

Have his hearing tested. Our son had hearing problems until age 4.5 and we did not even realise it. He behaved in the same way that your child seems to be behaving. Surgery fixed his hearing, but it still took over a year for him to catch up. I'm not sure where you're from. In Australia, this is a free test. If the problem persists, you may consider a ...


1

This is very common at this age even when there is only one language being spoken! Developing the skill of relating an event takes practice, and as you have discovered, kids often are reluctant. I would suggest a trip to the library to find materials your son actually enjoys. Some possibilities: Non-fiction. Boys often prefer this to fiction stories. He ...


1

Yes. Tell him. Tell him the word and what it means Also... Tell him who gets to use it and why it's not for 6 yr old boys. What I told/tell my kids: Look... you won't get in trouble from me if I hear it from you, but it's a bad habit for a kid your age. If you're chillin with your friends, droppin it here and there because it's funny, you're going ...



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