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10

Based on the information from this site children are usually able to answer simple questions (like the example you have given) by the time they reach 3. At 2.5 years most children are able to answer most yes/no questions. You can also find hints how to improve your child's answering skills. Remember that each child is different. One may start doing ...


10

You know your kid best. I personally vote for trust every time, because it was a big deal to ME when I was a kid when my parents trusted me enough to confide something like this in me. "I know you are mature enough not to use this word in your everyday language, so I'll tell you what it is and why people use it, and why we choose NOT to use it." Also, you ...


8

My experience tells me you should both speak your native tongue at home, and you can throw in some English along the way just for variety. You know how you can tell Chinese from Spanish, even if you speak neither? Children up to at least 7 years of age are incredibly good at telling languages apart - even languages they don't speak. Children can learn a ...


6

Welcome to the site, Sean! I generally encourage learning foreign languages but it requires that the parents can participate. Don't underestimate the challenge of new languages. My personal experience is that children can learn languages nearly automatically but adults find it very difficult. If you have a history of little or poor language learning ...


6

Parents dramatically overestimate the risk of not learning the community language, especially if you are in the US. In my family alone, over 7 languages have died in the last 3 or 4 generations (German, Russian, Swedish, French, Cherokee, Dutch, Polish). There has never been a case of a child born in the US failing to learn English from the community. My ...


4

One technique we were taught, that has helped me (but still has a long way to go, as I always talk too fast when presenting - just look at any of the videos of me online) is to treat full stops as breaths. Every time you hit a full stop, breathe. A full breath. This forces you to slow down, and it helps your thought processes. It works for kids - since I ...


4

Honestly, you are already doing most of what can be done about it, and even this tip isn't likely to make things a whole lot better. This is a common problem with this age group and up through the teen years. The best answer I found was to do what you are doing really - but consistently and refuse to understand when she doesn't slow down. Since she ...


3

I don't think your boy needs counseling based on my observations of my boys and their interactions with the other kids on the block. They are always "killing" something. Not literally. Not so much my oldest, but even he is oblivious to it, which supports your theory that it's the teachers that are upset by it. I had an incident last year where my boy and his ...


3

As Michael Thompson (child psychologist and author of several great books on raising boys and their emotional development) likes to say (I'm paraphrasing), kids know the difference between real violence and play, and we lose credibility with them when we act like we cannot tell the difference. If you're playing a game where you're pretending to be assassins ...


3

I was raised in a solely Spanish speaking home in the U.S. and have friends that come from English and Spanish speaking homes watching their sibling that only responded in English to their parents Spanish commands really hindered their ability and comfort speaking the language as they got older. I highly suggest insisting your child respond to you in Danish ...


3

We have always allowed swearing, openly and uncensored, in our household, with the exception of racial slurs or sexual choice words ("gay"). Those are taboo. We also don't allow swear words to be used to hurt or demean others (I.e. In an argumentative context). Beyond that, used as expletives or emphasis, we have always allowed our kids to use them freely, ...


3

I think it is an extremely bad idea to put a child into a school which teaches in a language you don't understand, and they have no background in. Children need help with their homework in order to do well, if it's in Mandarin how in the world would you even know if your child has even done it? And you are right to be worried about your child being ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


2

From 0 to now, your baby has been listening to the sounds of the language. Quantity is more important than quality-- that seems to be the consensus for the writers of the English, Tagalog and Russian nursery rhyme authors that we read to our baby. Sometimes I go through the alphabet or a list of words and just put them in any sentence that comes to mind ...


2

Any answer would only be an opinion, Learning English would be a good skill to have and would make it easier for her daughter on such occasions. But i don't see why it should make any difference, Speaking English does not make them any better than someone who cant speak English and her mother shouldn't have to learn another language just so her daughter will ...


1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...


1

Once she is old enough (depending on where you are, this is likely between 7th and 9th grades), enroll her in Speech and Debate. In Debate, talking fast is a big plus - but talking fast AND being understandable is absolutely crucial; and in other variants of speech, clarity and enunciation is very important. On top of that, it can be pretty fun, especially ...


1

Have his hearing tested. Our son had hearing problems until age 4.5 and we did not even realise it. He behaved in the same way that your child seems to be behaving. Surgery fixed his hearing, but it still took over a year for him to catch up. I'm not sure where you're from. In Australia, this is a free test. If the problem persists, you may consider a ...


1

This is very common at this age even when there is only one language being spoken! Developing the skill of relating an event takes practice, and as you have discovered, kids often are reluctant. I would suggest a trip to the library to find materials your son actually enjoys. Some possibilities: Non-fiction. Boys often prefer this to fiction stories. He ...


1

Yes. Tell him. Tell him the word and what it means Also... Tell him who gets to use it and why it's not for 6 yr old boys. What I told/tell my kids: Look... you won't get in trouble from me if I hear it from you, but it's a bad habit for a kid your age. If you're chillin with your friends, droppin it here and there because it's funny, you're going ...


1

I have met Icelander who said they learned a lot of their English from TV & sometimes you can tell which shows they watch (American vs British) by their accent. But they are in a country with widespread bilingualism, English has prestige (and more importantly isn't Danish) & is cool among young people, etc. My reading "Screen Time" was very ...


1

As far as toddler language acquisition is concerned, the more exposure a toddler gets to a language, the better he/she learns it. The correlation is direct and very obvious in young kids (say 1-5 years old). Exposure takes many forms: videos, songs, books, conversations with real people. So if you could read Spanish bedtime books along with showing the ...


1

thank you for the suggestions! following some of the advice, i changed the words i was using to search for these songs, and found this lovely piece at : http://akshara.niketana.com/ It uses a simple tune to go through a aa e ee all the way through the vyanjanas (consonants) also ! Which was exactly what I was looking for. it has no images, but the song ...



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