Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

Your child will learn the language from you, so if you are only somewhat capable in a language, your child will also become only somewhat capable. Since your are living in an English speaking country, I would suggest you teach her English as a mother tongue as she will not be able to become fluent in your own mother tongue without an outside tutor. And such ...


11

I agree with Erik's answer but I'd like to add a few things. Since you seem to speak your mother tongue with your parents, they are probably fluent in it? Have them speak your mother tongue with your child, only translating into English if the child doesn't seem to understand. I know a few people who's grown up learning a second language by speaking it ...


7

I have limited experience, but I also remember reading about some research on this. The most frequent situation is that father and mother have different native languages and use these to communicate with the children. This works very well. The children learn both languages properly. An interesting phenomenon is that the children tend to get angry if the ...


7

It appears that children don't learn language well from television because they need interaction and conversation. It's not so much that the "picture on a flat device [isn't] a person", but more that the child doesn't get a response when they try to talk back to the picture. In one study, when children had a conversation over Skype with an adult, they were ...


5

If there's one thing you should be worried about it's that your daughter is put in such a class and you were apparently not even aware of it... I find it really strange. But learning a second language is best done when you're young. Living in a bilingual country (Belgium), this is actually the direction towards a lot of schools/parents are moving: bilingual ...


4

You are all missing out! AUDIOBOOKS! We all spend time in the car, we all need to concentrate on driving... Get audiobooks in the languages that your kid needs more exposure too. It turns out their language skills develop further if they hear the same language in several voices, rather than just your own...


4

The user "Matt" posts an argument that your children are not speaking German because they do not like to speak it, but rather that they are not completely fluent in it. I'd actually like to offer a counter argument to that: I myself was raised with four languages, and have since observed my mother raise another child with the same languages. I'm also raising ...


4

I have found that it comes along as I have corrected my daughter's speech over the years as well. At the age of two I'd say she's doing just fine. According to this chart, she should be barely understandable. Sounds like your child's speech is on track, although it doesn't cover when you get into present versus past tense. According to this site, your ...


4

Personally I have grown up bilingually and on top of that went to an English level school and having read in the past through research regarding bilingualism in children I think it's fair to say that it's a huge advantage in many different ways: not only does it open up more paths later on in life, but purely from a cognitive point of view it helps a lot as ...


3

A child can learn to speak two languages natively. If you are able to give the child a chance of learning both languages natively, that could be an advantage later. So if your mother tongue would be useful for your child to learn, then I would say you speak your mother tongue to the child. Since you are living in an English speaking country, you can expect ...


2

Yes, it is absolutely possible for children to learn to speak in few different languages. I have seen 5 year children learning 3 different languages effortlessly. We live in English speaking country now. I talk to my daughter in my mother tongue so my parents can speak to their grand daughter and vice versa. My daughter is fluent in speaking in 2 languages. ...


2

According to the abstract of this study of 60 3-year-old children: From these experiments we conclude that children have the metalinguistic skills necessary to identify homonym pairs; moreover, they realized that homonyms represent two different categories. Finally, if children have a one-to-one mapping assumption, it is not strong enough to prevent them ...


2

Unless your daughter is learning disabled, all children have very good (mind bogglingly fantastic) language acquisitions skills-- in particular they can learn a language by mere exposure, which doesn't work for adults. Adults can be said to have a knack for picking up a 2nd or 3rd language-- usually not, adults study for years and still are incompetent--, ...


1

I don't think she'll have a problem. Our oldest was barely functional in French when he started school. This year will be his third year at the same (French, not even bilingual) school, and he's mostly fluent in both (still a bit better in English, but not by much). You'll be surprised by how quickly she absorbs it. As a side note, now's a really good time ...


1

My brother-in-law is from Mauritius, his wife from Poland and they live in UK. His girls speak fluently Polish and English and understand some French. I've never heard them "refusing" to speak any of the parents' language. The eldest sometimes interpret for polish school mates. She looks quite happy to know more than one language, so your worries maybe for ...


1

Well if you want your daughter to accelerate her english and an immersion school would help her learn at her own pace isn't that by definition the incorrect choice? If you want her to catch up in English then I do think a great standard school would work, you could also get her to a speech therapist. I am not sure what a French immersion school is, were ...


1

I started my son at age 8, but wish I had done it earlier as it would have been even easier for him. He lapped it up, we were home edding at the time so I could choose exactly which lessons he did and how long we spent on each and when we did them, so I could cater for when he didn't feel like it. He then went to prep school in the UK for five terms, ...


1

Since I can see it in her eyes that she wants to communicate but is not able to and I can see it bothering her a lot. One of the Amerind languages was reputed to be so hard that native children weren't fluently competent until about age 8. It is possible that if a child needs to speak 4 languages, it will take longer before they reach competency in all ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible