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47

Because children in that age range are learning language skills rapidly, and primarily by listening to what adults say. If they hear a new word, they will almost certainly try to use that word, even if they do not understand what the word means (which is frequently the case). It is how they learn. Obviously you aren't offended by profanity, but ...


41

I grew up bilingual, and so does my son of 18 months. My son and I both have a Danish father and an Austrian mother. Here is what I've learned, from my own life as child and as parent, and from others: Start immediately. it won't do to decide on this after a year or more. It must be from the start, because kids learn even before birth, and most under the ...


25

It's true: to stop swearing in front of your kids, you really have to stop swearing altogether. Like a lot of young couples, my wife and I swore casually in conversation, which kept the words in ready recall when you need an interjection for stubbing your toe. Even if you watch your mouth around the kids, when you get cut off in traffic or knock over a ...


21

It's all about language acquisition. The concept of pronouns is a little advanced for a 9-month-old who is only vaguely grasping the concept that everything has a name to begin with. When I refer to myself as "Mommy" to my daughter, it reinforces to her 1) who I am and 2) that I have a name just like everything else. While its initial use is for language ...


19

My wife and I have been raising our four year-old daughter exactly as you describe since birth. I speak to her in English, and my wife and her family speak to her in their native language -- even though all of us otherwise primarily speak English in our daily lives here in the US. It has worked out wonderfully; our daughter now speaks both languages ...


19

The /r/ sound is quite complex to produce and requires refined oral motor skills. It is often one of the last developing sounds in children. As a speech language pathologist, I work with many children who have difficulty with this sound. Because it's a later developing sound, using another sound such as the /l/ for it at 3 years of age is considered ...


18

Kids can and will quote you verbatim on the worst possible statements at the worst possible time. To avoid that, moderate your language at all times when the child is within earshot. I can sometimes bang my first into any nearby wall, or drop objects from a slightly-higher-than-necessary height, and I have seen my son imitate some of that for no apparent ...


16

The answer from the collective "Captain Obvious" ... Don't cuss in front of the kid ... is certainly correct. I don't expect it is very helpful to the OP, either. I am sure it occurred to him already, and I expect he asked here because he and his wife are struggling with it. So the real question, as far as I am concerned, is ... How do parents prevent ...


14

I remember saying hello to one of my daughter's friends when she was five-ish. The friend's response was "f***ing a***hole." She repeated this many times and thought it a great joke. I tend to curse like a sailor but did not find this funny or cute. With children, language spreads like a virus so we stopped encouraging our daughter from playing with the ...


14

Definitely don't let it slide, but also don't overreact. We used a consistent timeout policy (warning, ultimatum, timeout) with our teenager when he was younger, and despite the fact that he cusses like there is no tomorrow with his friends now, he will almost never cuss in front of us. With our four younger kids, all under 6yo, we also use a consistent ...


14

From my experience growing up bilingual, the problem won't be that your kids don't want you to speak the "foreign" language, but that they will refuse to speak the "foreign" language. (The fact that you will do uncool things is a given: you're the parent, anything you do is by definition uncool.) The only way to counteract this is to build up a good ...


13

Because "you" doesn't uniquely identify me. Parents want to teach their kids "dada" and "mama" and other subjects. Using "my" doesn't help with that. Similarly, parents will also say "Sasha hold mummy's hand" (Sasha being the baby) - this is to emphasize to the baby that her name is Sasha. If instead of using that language, I say "You hold my hand" - she ...


10

When should I allow a child to swear? When you feel like you should. That's really the only valid answer, as it's an extremely personal decision each parent will make on their own. Along with that comes the whole issue of what is a swear word vs. which is not along with context. I think most would say, in general, parents will frown upon swearing as ...


10

I say embrace it. The Western Hemisphere has a very large Spanish speaking population. The worst thing that can happen is your son will speak 3 languages as an adult. And that could benefit him in the long run. As long as he is speaking and studying English at home he should be fine. Don't worry.. Kids pick up language very easily.


10

You know your kid best. I personally vote for trust every time, because it was a big deal to ME when I was a kid when my parents trusted me enough to confide something like this in me. "I know you are mature enough not to use this word in your everyday language, so I'll tell you what it is and why people use it, and why we choose NOT to use it." Also, you ...


10

Based on the information from this site children are usually able to answer simple questions (like the example you have given) by the time they reach 3. At 2.5 years most children are able to answer most yes/no questions. You can also find hints how to improve your child's answering skills. Remember that each child is different. One may start doing ...


9

For me, the answer depends on the age of the child. Younger Children For a child who is, say, 3 years old or under, just ignoring it is a best practice. At that point, if they don't get a reaction, they probably won't use those words again. Another technique at that age is to morph what they've said into a different word. If they say "fuck" for example, ...


9

I live in Australia. My wife came to Australia 12 years ago from China. I can speak fluent Chinese. My 4 year old son goes to childcare 4 days a week and my parents look after him 1 day a week. So Monday to Friday during the day he speaks English. Here is how we help him to learn: Be consistent: He already spends plenty of time speaking English at school ...


9

You are asking the wrong question. Your question really is, how can I sensitize my children to understand the context of people with which they are interacting and choose their language and manner of expression accordingly? If that is your question, then all you have to do, is to let them listen to the language of those around them. If they are on a ...


9

The main thing I would recommend here is that you talk English around him. I appreciate that he's probably at daycare for longer time than he spends with you, but parenting time is more 1-1, and therefore has more of an immersion effect than daycare. You mentioned that his primary language is Thai, which I assume is from your wife. (please correct me if I'm ...


8

Any exposure to another language is great for children. With my sample space of two children, my daughter (now ten) was raised bi-lingual and is years ahead in both languages (school-wise) even though she has limited exposure to her second language. My son (3.5) primarily speaks and thinks in his second language but can swap to English very quickly. He, ...


8

Any age Please start right away! It is great for your child to have even just exposure to another language. Others will disagree and talk about exactly how to achieve fluency, but my take on it is, exposure no matter how small is better than just plain old monlinguism. Since you speak English pretty well, if you used English with the baby 24/7, it would ...


8

I'll start off by saying that there is a time and place for text shortcuts like the ones you described. Where, exactly, the time and place for those shortcuts are is subject to debate. In my opinion, the appropriate time and place for this is either in real-time chat, where taking the time to ensure proper spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) can ...


8

My experience tells me you should both speak your native tongue at home, and you can throw in some English along the way just for variety. You know how you can tell Chinese from Spanish, even if you speak neither? Children up to at least 7 years of age are incredibly good at telling languages apart - even languages they don't speak. Children can learn a ...


7

It took my husband and myself about 6 months (before the kids were born, so less pressure) but we were eventually able to stop. Now most, if any, of the cursing just happens inside my head. You just have to find replacement words - "fudge", "shucks", "heck", "darn", etc. Once you have replacement words - it's a matter of replacing your vocabulary. It's a ...


7

Why would you ever let your kids swear - even as adults we know that many people are offended, and so even though I may swear in certain select groups, my default behaviour is to never swear and I am generally surprised when I hear others swear. Children should have no reason to swear (adults shouldn't have any reason to swear, but we figure once you are ...


6

When they show an interest I did Latin for one year at school, aged 13. I can whole-heartedly say that it has helped immensely through other education, not because those subjects use Latin, but because the 'lingo-lego' nature of Latin helps you to analyse/deconstruct other words, phrases and languages. It helped with my Mathematics, Computing, French and ...


6

Since you asked for "strategies" plural: The best way to raise a child who is fluent (and literate) in Tagalog despite growing up in an English-speaking country is for both parents to always speak Tagalog at home. Reserve English for interactions with the outside world — school, work, playmates. Don't even bother teaching the child English at first; ...


6

I'm not familiar with the Rosetta CD you refer to, but there has been a few interesting language questions (here and here) that might help you. To address your question: It's never too early to expose children to new languages, because they can hear very well right from birth, and the sounds they hear shape their ability to discern the patterns and melodies ...


6

You are asking how to prevent your kids from picking up your language without actually curbing your language. Short of forcing the kid to wear ear plugs, there isn't a solution for that. So, assume he's going to pick up your language. At that point, you need to help let the child know when it's not OK to use those words. In our house, we have a policy ...



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