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Adding to the wonderful answers, there is something you can do (besides being patient, and speaking to your child in meaningful ways, as already mentioned). You can read picture books to your child, adapting the text on the page in a flexible way. This encourages language development, and is a fun activity for both of you. If you are already doing this, ...


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Adding to Stephie's great answer -- As she said, never correct -- simply ask. Example: "Can we have 'paghetti, Daddy?" "You want (slowly) spaghetti for dinner?" (Wait for nod or verbal response) "Let's see if we have some spaghetti in the cupboard, shall we?" If it's a multi-syllable word, and the child is getting them mixed up, step one is, you ...


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Baby Sign Language If your goal is communicating with your young child, and developing their language abilities, try sign language. Not standard adult sign language, modified simple Baby Sign Language. Babies and toddlers gain control of their limbs and hands long before they can utter verbalizations. The cognitive ability for language arrives before the ...


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Every child develops at his own pace, but let me say this: those coos, ohhs, and aahs are him speaking to you. You just haven't learned what he's saying. :) He learns by listening, then repeating. The best technique for you teaching him is, therefore: talk, listen, encourage. Repeat. Importantly, don't just say the same word over and again. That's how you ...


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Right now, your child is still primarily cooing or babbling, which is one of the ways infants learn to use the parts of their body necessary for speech. Cooing and babbling are good signs, and should be encouraged! At 9 months, your son could start saying a recognizable word any day, or it could even be another 9 months away. Each child is different, and ...


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9 months is too early to expect them to speak yet and they'll pick it up when they're ready, usually before they're 2 years old. What you can do at this stage is to take him with you as you go about your day. Give a running commentary about the things you see and do so they hear you speak and can match it to the world around them. Hearing language is ...


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First: Pick your battles wisely. There is no need to train your child to use the proper words in each and every case. (And no, this is not the "Aawww, so cute when he says 'Duper!'" perspective, more an "The grass doesn't grow faster when you pull on it.") Even if you suspect "stubbornness" remember that your child has reached an age where he starts to ...


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A toddler learn most of his/her early feats by imitation. That goes the same way with language. They essentially repeat what they have heard. Babbling is when they start to do that. The "wah-er-bah-dah" does not sound like anything you'd recognised, but it is their best attempt to say something they heard. My 15 month-old daughter makes a few of those ...



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