Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...


0

I was a fast speaker growing up (still am) and was constantly reminded to slow down. It never really helped. Then at some point I was given the advice to remember to breathe. That did the trick. I found that focusing on remembering to breathe forces you to take pauses which naturally regulates your pace.


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


1

Seek help in older relatives of child. Maybe a private lessons? Otherwise you have to learn that language, team up with other parents and try to teach by yourself. To complete my answer that's what my parents did. They invested what they could (time, money in books, computer software, private lessons, introducing me to natives) in me to later make me ...


4

Personally, I would definitely try to enforce the 'No English' rule at home, although realistically, I'm not sure you will be able to keep it for very long. I'll also second what JPmiaou wrote about using every chance to expose them to the minority languages, and taking comfort in the idea that they won't forget what they learn, even if they one day decide ...


2

This is a variant of the "both parents speak the minority language" model of bilingual childrearing, except with two minority languages, one for each parent. My sister and I grew up in the bilingual version, and I think its success definitely depended on the strict No Majority Language In The House rule that our parents enforced. Our friends from similarly ...


2

No research (sorry!) but personal experience: I'd like to suggest that you take into account whether they are likely to need your languages (Fin/Jap) outside of your home? For instance, if you're in Britain, then knowing Finnish is a neat gimmick but hardly useful - unless you frequently visit (or have visitors from) Finland. Same for Japanese, of course. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included