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10

No, a child will not teach themselves to develop a new "language" to express themselves, at least not by any generally accepted definition of the term "language". Language is a complex tool used by multiple people or a community. A single child who is never exposed to verbal language does not make up their own... what would be the point if no one ...


10

Based on the information from this site children are usually able to answer simple questions (like the example you have given) by the time they reach 3. At 2.5 years most children are able to answer most yes/no questions. You can also find hints how to improve your child's answering skills. Remember that each child is different. One may start doing ...


7

If your son is otherwise progressing well in his development (that "his play becomes more complicated" and "he wants to explain the rules" is an indication of that), I would not worry (and would certainly not start hectic manouevres to speed up his linguistic development). If you don't feel qualified to judge his general development, don't hesitate to talk ...


7

This is the "forbidden experiment"-- linguist wish they new more about this because it has implications for other questions. But doing this to children is barbaric child abuse. So we wait for natural experiments to arise. The best documented ones are the ones Beofett covered, so I won't repeat that part. The cases of feral children and children locked up ...


6

It's only me in the house. I have to teach him 2 languages. Actually, you don't "have to". In India, people in northern states speak Hindi at home. Not all Indians are fluent in English yet their toddlers know the meanings of English words like cat/watch etc. The reason is the "playschool". Here the people usually send their children to formal ...


6

Welcome to the site, Sean! I generally encourage learning foreign languages but it requires that the parents can participate. Don't underestimate the challenge of new languages. My personal experience is that children can learn languages nearly automatically but adults find it very difficult. If you have a history of little or poor language learning ...


6

If you start reading immediately after your child is born (or even before!), which I highly recommend, and if the goal specifically to exposure your child to English language, then I'd read the English story books in English only. However, I'd suggest taking it a step further than just reading a selection of stories in English. The more exposure to each ...


6

Yes, it's completely normal. My 3 1/2 year old daughter has her pronouns pretty much down already, but my 6 year old son was still mixing them up at age 5, if I remember correctly. It's anecdotal evidence, but the main difference I see is my son talks your ears off, and doesn't stop to listen, so it's tiresome to correct his grammar every single time. ...


6

The best way to teach your child English is to not speak it at home. I have a friend who works with non-native kids in a school, helping them catch up. She says the typical profile of the children coming to her are kids whose parents tried to speak the local language with them... badly. The parents have good intentions, but by the time the kids would start ...


5

Most mispronunciations are not something you can correct by telling the child they are saying it wrongly. One of my children had a persistent use of the n sound where l belongs (eg eating nunch) and I kept asking my doctor who kept saying n is one of the last sounds for children to get right. I kept countering that if my child was saying "wunch" like the ...


5

Make it a game is my advice, make it fun. You have a ready-made reward system as well, break a cookie into pieces and give her one every time she asks for it right in German. Get her to learn the german for "yes you may" or the equivalent, so she can give you a piece when you say it right. As soon as it sounds like work you might lose her.


5

It could be a symptom of brain injury, or it could be completely benign—a result of stress, being tired, or just the natural evolution of his language skills. Sometimes kids that age start trying to imitate adults by talking just as fast, but their oral motor skills aren't developed enough yet. They also aren't very aware yet of how their speech ...


5

When an adult doesn't know a word in a foreign language, they will resort to complicated sentences that have lots of subordinate clauses (i.e. that thing I used to eat cereal with). That would be way out of the range of a kid in the 2 word sentence phase. So he's looking for the right pair of words to express himself. I've read that vocab acquisition is ...


5

My situation is as follows I am English but for a number of years worked for a large engineering company in Thailand. Here there were a few English families and Japanese families together with the local Thai population. While living in Thailand I married a local girl and we had our daughter. At the time my wife spoke little English and my Thai was less ...


4

I know this is an old question, but in case anyone else searches and finds it I'd like to mention that at 16 months a child who is using no verbal language, and which the parents suspect the child doesn't understand verbal language, is a definite cause for concern. The best way to go about handling the concern is to contact your state (or county) Early ...


4

Experience from my bilingual family set up (5 year-old child): First of all, I don't think you should worry. Second, I don't think you need to look for any pediatrician advice at this point. Third: the situation may me more related to the parents than to the child. If both parents work full time, and pre-school is in English, the child will have to ...


4

I was in exactly the same situation a couple of years ago. I took it as a challenge. Today, my son is 4 and we both speak English. It's kinda funny though. When people ask: Ah, you're teaching him English? That's great, man! My answer is: Nope. We are actually learning the language together. Here're some tips off the top of my head: use ...


4

Honestly, you are already doing most of what can be done about it, and even this tip isn't likely to make things a whole lot better. This is a common problem with this age group and up through the teen years. The best answer I found was to do what you are doing really - but consistently and refuse to understand when she doesn't slow down. Since she ...


4

One technique we were taught, that has helped me (but still has a long way to go, as I always talk too fast when presenting - just look at any of the videos of me online) is to treat full stops as breaths. Every time you hit a full stop, breathe. A full breath. This forces you to slow down, and it helps your thought processes. It works for kids - since I ...


4

Personally, I would definitely try to enforce the 'No English' rule at home, although realistically, I'm not sure you will be able to keep it for very long. I'll also second what JPmiaou wrote about using every chance to expose them to the minority languages, and taking comfort in the idea that they won't forget what they learn, even if they one day decide ...


3

Most speech concerns are not real worries until a child is 5 or 6. If children continue to have a lisp when they begin elementary school they are generally referred to a speech specialist to work on those sounds. As much as a lisp in a toddler is not a concern, children learn language from imitating what they hear. It is never too young to speak clearly and ...


3

I think it is an extremely bad idea to put a child into a school which teaches in a language you don't understand, and they have no background in. Children need help with their homework in order to do well, if it's in Mandarin how in the world would you even know if your child has even done it? And you are right to be worried about your child being ...


3

Whatever the language, repetition is the key. If you want to have him understand Russian and English equally well, then you need to speak them with approximately equal frequency. Rather than just focusing on one word ("cat", "dog", "hello") at a time, use full sentences ("Come over here", "Sit down", "Let's eat a snack"). You can try telling him something ...


3

At ten to twelve months, no, not really. At 18 months, yes. According to a study by Pruden, Hirsh-Pasek, Golinkoff, and Hennon (abstract, full text), ten-month-old babies learn words for objects that they find interesting, not words that speakers direct them to learn. However, by 18 months, they learn words through attention to social cues. (See p. 267 – ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


2

I have been doing EI for 18 years and 99% of the kids I have worked with as well as typically developing kids I know including my own 4 all said dada first. Every speech therapist I work with also usually tells parents that dada comes first and it has nothing to do with mommy or daddy. It's just a sound they make when they first start making the sound. ...


2

From 0 to now, your baby has been listening to the sounds of the language. Quantity is more important than quality-- that seems to be the consensus for the writers of the English, Tagalog and Russian nursery rhyme authors that we read to our baby. Sometimes I go through the alphabet or a list of words and just put them in any sentence that comes to mind ...


2

You have mentioned that school is only a half-year away, and that you're confident (rightly so, I'd say) that she'll pick it up when she's there. Beside exposing her as much as you can to other German speakers, I don't think there's much you can do. At this age, she is imitating her parents, and since you're not speaking German with her, she's not going to ...


2

One huge things that a lot of parents I have in my mother group don't realise is that children have multiple phrases, sentences and words that are new to them every day. Sometimes this may be a little confusing and sometimes instructions can be confused with others as they may be smart, yes, but their IQ does not determine their processing rate. My tip ...


2

No research (sorry!) but personal experience: I'd like to suggest that you take into account whether they are likely to need your languages (Fin/Jap) outside of your home? For instance, if you're in Britain, then knowing Finnish is a neat gimmick but hardly useful - unless you frequently visit (or have visitors from) Finland. Same for Japanese, of course. ...



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