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17

I'm married to a Speech Therapist who owns her own clinic, so while she's really the best to answer your question, I can tell you from my observations and discussions with my wife that your child would not likely qualify as "delayed" based on your description. We also have a 2 year-old who's speech developed slower than his older sister's so that also gives ...


11

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


10

If you want to encourage his development, spend time with him and talk to him like you would an adult. Speak to him as though he can understand everything you are saying. If you need to go to the gas station or grocery store, take him with you and explain what is going on while you're doing it. Let him hear you speak with other people. He may not like ...


7

If you are worried, you should have his hearing checked first. It is not uncommon for Small children to develop a hearing impediment caused by ear infections, which will have an impact on their speech development.


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


6

As a mother and speech-language pathologist, I understand the concerns of speech and language development. Some general information to know is each sound of our language has a different range of ages in which your child should correctly produce the sound. By age 8, your child should be able to produce all sounds of the English language, unless second ...


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


5

Some actual quotes from the video: Talk to a child as if you were talking to another adult. Don't use baby language. Don't even use oversimplified language. Talk to a child just as you would talk to another person. You will find that by the time they're three years old, they will have an amazing mastery of the English language, and will be able ...


3

My daughter didn't speak any even remotely recognizable words at 2 years old. We didn't do anything special, and eventually she figured it out. She is 13 years old now, and has had straight A's for 5 years straight, scored in the 99th percentile across the board on her high school entrance exams, played the lead in the 8th-grade play, and won a partial ...


3

Please allow me to offer a few points of information. Your child may be phonetically inclined, and it seems he may be having trouble separating words from their sounds. He may be also having trouble separating words from other words. What is his awareness to the situation and is has he been socially affected by it? Does he feel he has a problem or shows ...


3

I do not know who said that he should know 50+ words. That's clearly not the case with the vast majority of children. Here is a nice chart on child development I read somewhere on this site (do not take this chart as absolute limits, most children that are advanced in one area tend to be somewhat late in another area): Development chart From what you say, ...


3

Peers count for a lot. You can expect them to talk like their peers. Ref. In Raising Bebe, the author had a funny story about her toddler learning to cuss (with French toddler cuss words) from her peers at pre-school. Modeling counts, while you can not expect them to understand immediately which contexts to use whqt, they will eventually use the right ...


3

Interesting question. I think you'd need to split up the question a little further. Most of my answers rely on Lise Eliot's book What's Going on in There, which I unfortunately returned to the library on Friday, so I'm only able to paraphrase the few things I remembered or made notes of. Will she be able to learn to speak another language? As you already ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


2

I speak Portuguese, my husband speaks French and we live in the US. The only language we have in common is English. Since we both can speak a tiny bit of each other's language( I more so than him), and since I am staying home mom, I try to speak all 3 of them to my son. It happens naturally depending on what I am talking about with my son. If I am trying to ...


2

My suggestion would be to not enforce it, but do 2 things: Don't generally speak English to him. If he speaks English, simply answer in Finnish/Japanese. Make a game out of it. When he starts learning new words, ask him what they are called in Finnish/Japanese. I think learning through playing is really useful to kids. My husband and I are both ...


2

My son is 2 in half and he had his tongue clipped today. He has been in speech therapy for 3 months before surgery. After his surgery his tongue was still num and as we was leaving Cody was eating a red popsicle and I noticed he was bleeding so I rushed him back inside. Cody was bitting on his tongue eating it. I didn't know what to do . So I popped my boob ...


2

There are entire countries where language switching is the norm, i.e. from sentence to sentence you switch among two or more languages. They do not get confused. People who are monolingual think speaking anything but one language is confusing because high school French was confusing for them. Children have been reported to prefer to speak one particular ...


2

Unless your daughter is learning disabled, all children have very good (mind bogglingly fantastic) language acquisitions skills-- in particular they can learn a language by mere exposure, which doesn't work for adults. Adults can be said to have a knack for picking up a 2nd or 3rd language-- usually not, adults study for years and still are incompetent--, ...


2

First of all, I wouldn't worry too much. Learning languages takes some time. It is often said that speech in bilingual kids can be delayed. Even if he is already fluent in his first and even his second language, he might just need some time to process a third one. It's a good sign that he understands German; give him some time, and the rest will follow. I ...


2

You are all missing out! AUDIOBOOKS! We all spend time in the car, we all need to concentrate on driving... Get audiobooks in the languages that your kid needs more exposure too. It turns out their language skills develop further if they hear the same language in several voices, rather than just your own...


2

I'm just a parent of a little girl slightly older than your son. She has similar problems, but I'm not worried. I recommend to read with him, picture books, let him locate pictures of animals and name them, or ask what they say. Cat, snake, dog... Do not hesitate to read the very same book twice in a row, or more, but you must keep him active and ...


1

Anecdotal only but I didn't say anything much for years after my first word. One time my mum threw on the brakes and I fell into the foot-well and my first sentence was "If you do that again, I will pack my bags and move to Granny's house." So I kinda skipped all the steps between around 1 year-old to about 4 year. After that though, no-one could shut me ...


1

My 5mnth old had hers done its been 24hrs and she bled quite abit so we had to stay until it stopped they used something to stop the bleeding-forget what its called.she was in pain all evening afterwards but nursed quite well i also noticed dark colored bowel movement which is not her norm but im almost certain its from swallowing blood.today it looks ...


1

When raising our baby, the changing table was one good place for practicing sound mimicry. I would make a sound, and she would try to imitate. We started with vowel sounds, then work on consonant sounds. Each time she figured out how to form her lips, teeth and tongue to make the sound correctly, I would respond with excitement and laughter. She loved it, ...


1

Well if you want your daughter to accelerate her english and an immersion school would help her learn at her own pace isn't that by definition the incorrect choice? If you want her to catch up in English then I do think a great standard school would work, you could also get her to a speech therapist. I am not sure what a French immersion school is, were ...


1

I live in Indonesia and I have a son who is 15 months old. My native language is English but I can speak Indonesian and Javanese too (the local language here which is pretty close to Indonesian). His dad is Indonesian and speaks all three languages also but the grammar in English is not perfect. The majority of the other people around him speak Indonesian ...


1

I started my son at age 8, but wish I had done it earlier as it would have been even easier for him. He lapped it up, we were home edding at the time so I could choose exactly which lessons he did and how long we spent on each and when we did them, so I could cater for when he didn't feel like it. He then went to prep school in the UK for five terms, ...


1

My guess is that your child will do fine. It takes effort to lean to speak, and up to now, understanding German has been enough. Daycare for the first three years does not exactly make a lot of linguistic demands on a child. I had a son who largely refused to speak his (only, native) language until well after the age his older brothers had. There was ...



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