Hot answers tagged

17

I'm married to a Speech Therapist who owns her own clinic, so while she's really the best to answer your question, I can tell you from my observations and discussions with my wife that your child would not likely qualify as "delayed" based on your description. We also have a 2 year-old who's speech developed slower than his older sister's so that also gives ...


17

This is a clip of the Denver II Developmental Milestones checklist: If you draw a vertical line from the slash in dada/mama specific and the "c" in dada/mama non-specific, you'll have the 8 month old line. The white rectangle is "average"; the blue one means "late but still normal". Falling off the blue box means "possibly prudent to follow-up". There ...


12

If you want to encourage his development, spend time with him and talk to him like you would an adult. Speak to him as though he can understand everything you are saying. If you need to go to the gas station or grocery store, take him with you and explain what is going on while you're doing it. Let him hear you speak with other people. He may not like ...


10

I would suggest a 3rd option. Our kids are bilingual in English (used in preschool) and Danish (used at home). They are currently 2 & 4. We speak almost only Danish to them, though we do read some some books in English. Both of them, when starting to speak, started in mostly Danish, then switched to some words in English, some in Danish. We never ...


10

Just talk with your kid. Have a lot of conversations. Kids have an amazing ability to digest language and separate words into the correct language. They also have the ability to be stubborn, willful and belligerent. If she doesn't want to speak it, you may not be able to change that yet. My daughter is fluent in a second language (her mother's) but it has ...


8

We moved with three kids ages 1-4 from Germany (your name sounds German, so this may be relevant). We were lucky enough to find a pre-school program that was for kids whose first language was neither English, Spanish or Portuguese (large Brazilian population). It worked great and within a year or so the kids were perfectly bilingual for their age. Kid #2 ...


7

If you are worried, you should have his hearing checked first. It is not uncommon for Small children to develop a hearing impediment caused by ear infections, which will have an impact on their speech development.


7

It appears that children don't learn language well from television because they need interaction and conversation. It's not so much that the "picture on a flat device [isn't] a person", but more that the child doesn't get a response when they try to talk back to the picture. In one study, when children had a conversation over Skype with an adult, they were ...


6

First: Pick your battles wisely. There is no need to train your child to use the proper words in each and every case. (And no, this is not the "Aawww, so cute when he says 'Duper!'" perspective, more an "The grass doesn't grow faster when you pull on it.") Even if you suspect "stubbornness" remember that your child has reached an age where he starts to ...


6

Children develop at their own speed. Especially language shows a lot of variation. Some start early and form complex sentences soon, others start early, stay at the one- or two-word stage for a looong time, then catch up and some are virtually mute, then improve drastically and "never stop talking" again. If you search around here at Parenting SE there are a ...


5

Some actual quotes from the video: Talk to a child as if you were talking to another adult. Don't use baby language. Don't even use oversimplified language. Talk to a child just as you would talk to another person. You will find that by the time they're three years old, they will have an amazing mastery of the English language, and will be able ...


5

9 months is too early to expect them to speak yet and they'll pick it up when they're ready, usually before they're 2 years old. What you can do at this stage is to take him with you as you go about your day. Give a running commentary about the things you see and do so they hear you speak and can match it to the world around them. Hearing language is ...


4

I have found that it comes along as I have corrected my daughter's speech over the years as well. At the age of two I'd say she's doing just fine. According to this chart, she should be barely understandable. Sounds like your child's speech is on track, although it doesn't cover when you get into present versus past tense. According to this site, your ...


4

According to the abstract of this study of 60 3-year-old children: From these experiments we conclude that children have the metalinguistic skills necessary to identify homonym pairs; moreover, they realized that homonyms represent two different categories. Finally, if children have a one-to-one mapping assumption, it is not strong enough to prevent them ...


4

This behavior is a normal part of development for a two-year-old. At 24 months a child should have about 70% accuracy of consonants, and by 36 months about 87% accuracy. Producing "b" instead of "f" is one example of a very common mistake a child of this age might make. Of course, if it seems like the accuracy is worse than 70%, or if the child does not ...


3

My daughter didn't speak any even remotely recognizable words at 2 years old. We didn't do anything special, and eventually she figured it out. She is 13 years old now, and has had straight A's for 5 years straight, scored in the 99th percentile across the board on her high school entrance exams, played the lead in the 8th-grade play, and won a partial ...


3

I do not know who said that he should know 50+ words. That's clearly not the case with the vast majority of children. Here is a nice chart on child development I read somewhere on this site (do not take this chart as absolute limits, most children that are advanced in one area tend to be somewhat late in another area): Development chart From what you say, ...


3

Age of Child (source: http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-development/language_development/) 6 Months Vocalization with intonation Responds to his name Responds to human voices without visual cues by turning his head and eyes Responds appropriately to friendly and angry tones 12 Months Uses one or more words with meaning (this may be a fragment ...


3

Please allow me to offer a few points of information. Your child may be phonetically inclined, and it seems he may be having trouble separating words from their sounds. He may be also having trouble separating words from other words. What is his awareness to the situation and is has he been socially affected by it? Does he feel he has a problem or shows ...


3

Baby Sign Language If your goal is communicating with your young child, and developing their language abilities, try sign language. Not standard adult sign language, modified simple Baby Sign Language. Babies and toddlers gain control of their limbs and hands long before they can utter verbalizations. The cognitive ability for language arrives before the ...


3

Every child develops at his own pace, but let me say this: those coos, ohhs, and aahs are him speaking to you. You just haven't learned what he's saying. :) He learns by listening, then repeating. The best technique for you teaching him is, therefore: talk, listen, encourage. Repeat. Importantly, don't just say the same word over and again. That's how you ...


3

Our son is also 16 months and I was starting to worry slightly as he didn't seem to be saying any words until recently. He didn't even say Mama or Papa. I had read that at one year, children should be saying one or two words in addition to Mummy and Daddy. However, in recent weeks, we suddenly started to understand a lot of words from my son. He currently ...


3

If your son has an immediate family member who only converses with him in Hindi, he will become a fluent speaker of Hindi. The language development may progress a bit more slowly than his English, with more people speaking English to him, but he will learn the language. However, as he gets more verbal, your son may not initially seem interested in learning ...


3

It might not be easy but definitely go for it. Having some personal and family/friends experience in multilinguisme with kids my advices would be (cannot add the references for my claims on studies results right now but I will try to add them later) As much as you can find kids that would speak Russian with yours. Making Russian an important social ...


3

Development checklists. Phooey. You can never really know what is right for a baby. ...but as a parent, it can sure make you wonder! I've got lots of kids, and even more nephews and nieces. So far they have all turned out well. So let me give you a few drastically contrasting histories. Some totally unclinical, anecdotal histories: First daughter: Never ...


3

I just wanted to add a slight counterpoint to zxq9's answer, as I'm not sure it's correct that if something's wrong it won't be ambiguous. There are plenty of conditions that only become obvious when the ability gap between a child and their peers has widened quite a bit, but which could be handled better if the child was given some support before then. A ...


3

I am not qualified to give you a real response as I am not a professional in this field in anyway, but I am bilingual and my mother taught me how she made both my sister and I fluent in both Korean and English. First of all, she made sure only to speak in Korean with me, while I was learning English in an American school. She also made sure that I NEVER ...


2

Well, I am a Pakistani and I am a bilingual. My mother taught me both languages as I was a toddler, but she mostly used Urdu (which is extremely similar to Hindi) at home. She did teach me English words but those that I could relate to or those which a child finds at home. You should take it very gently, teaching her English words gradually but do not speak ...



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