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17

This is a clip of the Denver II Developmental Milestones checklist: If you draw a vertical line from the slash in dada/mama specific and the "c" in dada/mama non-specific, you'll have the 8 month old line. The white rectangle is "average"; the blue one means "late but still normal". Falling off the blue box means "possibly prudent to follow-up". There ...


12

We moved with three kids ages 1-4 from Germany (your name sounds German, so this may be relevant). We were lucky enough to find a pre-school program that was for kids whose first language was neither English, Spanish or Portuguese (large Brazilian population). It worked great and within a year or so the kids were perfectly bilingual for their age. Kid #2 ...


7

It appears that children don't learn language well from television because they need interaction and conversation. It's not so much that the "picture on a flat device [isn't] a person", but more that the child doesn't get a response when they try to talk back to the picture. In one study, when children had a conversation over Skype with an adult, they were ...


6

First: Pick your battles wisely. There is no need to train your child to use the proper words in each and every case. (And no, this is not the "Aawww, so cute when he says 'Duper!'" perspective, more an "The grass doesn't grow faster when you pull on it.") Even if you suspect "stubbornness" remember that your child has reached an age where he starts to ...


6

You should get your child in to be evaluated by her pediatrician. There are a number of syndromes that could explain what you are perceiving, some of which are speech related, while others are general developmental issues. I'm not going to name any of them because I'm not a doctor and you shouldn't be getting your child evaluated by some random person in ...


5

I am not qualified to give you a real response as I am not a professional in this field in anyway, but I am bilingual and my mother taught me how she made both my sister and I fluent in both Korean and English. First of all, she made sure only to speak in Korean with me, while I was learning English in an American school. She also made sure that I NEVER ...


5

9 months is too early to expect them to speak yet and they'll pick it up when they're ready, usually before they're 2 years old. What you can do at this stage is to take him with you as you go about your day. Give a running commentary about the things you see and do so they hear you speak and can match it to the world around them. Hearing language is ...


4

This behavior is a normal part of development for a two-year-old. At 24 months a child should have about 70% accuracy of consonants, and by 36 months about 87% accuracy. Producing "b" instead of "f" is one example of a very common mistake a child of this age might make. Of course, if it seems like the accuracy is worse than 70%, or if the child does not ...


4

Development checklists. Phooey. You can never really know what is right for a baby. ...but as a parent, it can sure make you wonder! I've got lots of kids, and even more nephews and nieces. So far they have all turned out well. So let me give you a few drastically contrasting histories. Some totally unclinical, anecdotal histories: First daughter: Never ...


3

I just wanted to add a slight counterpoint to zxq9's answer, as I'm not sure it's correct that if something's wrong it won't be ambiguous. There are plenty of conditions that only become obvious when the ability gap between a child and their peers has widened quite a bit, but which could be handled better if the child was given some support before then. A ...


3

Baby Sign Language If your goal is communicating with your young child, and developing their language abilities, try sign language. Not standard adult sign language, modified simple Baby Sign Language. Babies and toddlers gain control of their limbs and hands long before they can utter verbalizations. The cognitive ability for language arrives before the ...


3

Every child develops at his own pace, but let me say this: those coos, ohhs, and aahs are him speaking to you. You just haven't learned what he's saying. :) He learns by listening, then repeating. The best technique for you teaching him is, therefore: talk, listen, encourage. Repeat. Importantly, don't just say the same word over and again. That's how you ...


3

Everyone giving you an age without a qualifying "on average" would be grossly generalizing. Currently the ability to read (as in take an abstract symbol and attach meaning) is seen as a process of brain development, stemming from the same ability that allowed our ancestors to conclude from animal footprints to the behavior and whereabouts of the animal that ...


2

Well, I am a Pakistani and I am a bilingual. My mother taught me both languages as I was a toddler, but she mostly used Urdu (which is extremely similar to Hindi) at home. She did teach me English words but those that I could relate to or those which a child finds at home. You should take it very gently, teaching her English words gradually but do not speak ...


2

A toddler learn most of his/her early feats by imitation. That goes the same way with language. They essentially repeat what they have heard. Babbling is when they start to do that. The "wah-er-bah-dah" does not sound like anything you'd recognised, but it is their best attempt to say something they heard. My 15 month-old daughter makes a few of those ...


2

Right now, your child is still primarily cooing or babbling, which is one of the ways infants learn to use the parts of their body necessary for speech. Cooing and babbling are good signs, and should be encouraged! At 9 months, your son could start saying a recognizable word any day, or it could even be another 9 months away. Each child is different, and ...


2

There is no rule for this, and it's different with every child. My girls are both bi-lingual. I speak to them in one language, and my wife (and the environment) speak to them in another. My eldest started speaking both languages more or less together, and is happy to switch from one to the other when talking to different people. My second would only speak ...


2

She understands the words just fine, what she doesn't understand is the underlying cause. Kids that age live very much in the moment. Past and present get jumbled in their mind, and they don't pause to reflect on their motivation. Somehow parents can't resist asking why anyway, but I can count on one hand the number of times I've received an answer that ...


2

a) If he has been exposed to a lot more Hebrew (e.g. at school) than English, it seems natural that he would be a lot more comfortable speaking in Hebrew. While children in general have an easier time learning languages than adults, I'm sure there is a range, just as there is with adults (some adults can pick up languages in no time, while others require ...


2

My advice would be to teach your son as many languages as you can, as early as you can - he will sort it out eventually. At first, he will be confused but keep explaining that there are different people who use different words for the same things and teach him the words for the same object in different languages all the time. Your son will likely have a ...


2

I'm in a similar situation, linguistically. The thing is, I have two, and can see the differences between them in this respect. My eldest learnt both languages in parallel, the way you think "should" happen. My second has a much stronger first language, and is only now starting to speak short sentences in the second, though she has always understood all ...


2

Children are generally taught to start reading words in their Reception year at school (age 4-5), however I think from personal experience I would say that being able to read short words in a sentence does not automatically equate to being able to understand the meaning and context of the sentence. By age 6, a good proportion of children are able to read ...


2

Definitely. Especially in a situation where they're surrounded by multiple languages that handle pronunciation differently. Your child is learning three languages simultaneously, so it's not terribly surprising that they may stumble over some sounds more than a child that only learns its native language. The thing, as it often seems to be with raising a ...


2

Reading is the best practice for spelling. My suggestion is to not focus so hard on "spelling" practice, like it's its own discipline. Reading, writing, and spelling are all part of the same set of skills. Have your child read books out loud to you casually while you sit on the couch. You don't have to really pay attention, but if you hear the child ...


1

The one parent-one language policy is popular in many advice books on how to raise bilingual children, that said many policies work provided that the child gets enough exposure to each language (ballpark of 20+ hours each) Different language communities have different customs on language switching. In the Philippines, US boarder with Mexico, hipster ...


1

My children grow up multi-lingual, with one language spoken by me and the grandparents, which is also what my wife and me speak together, one language spoken by my wife, and finally the language spoken at day care, which is in the same language family as the one I speak with them. The level of proficiency in each of these three languages closely mirrors the ...


1

First, you are doing such a great thing for your son, giving him access to another language! We have a not too dissimilar situation in our household. My 7yr old daughters first language is English but her mom speaks to her entirely in Russian. She also struggles with Russian in response but understands pretty much everything my wife says. Neither of us ...


1

It cannot be forced. I tried and failed dismally. My daughter first learnt my wife's language then English. Once she learnt English, she would refuse to go back. Teaching a child another language is a long term process. My kids have been going to language school since the age of 6 and will continue until they achieve year 12 proficiency. I would love them ...


1

Coming under other practical advice, many times employers include specialist relocation consulting as part of their relo packages. This consulting might include finding the right schools and playgroups, and can often be a big help. Sometimes people don't use all the potential resources offered, so be sure to find out what's available, and don't be afraid to ...


1

I have two children with special needs and both have speech and Language difficulties. We moved from the UK to abroad and our children not only picked up the language but one of them retained their English so is bilingual. The other one is actually able to understand English just prefers to speak in the other language which he of course hears all day every ...



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