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11

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


6

As a mother and speech-language pathologist, I understand the concerns of speech and language development. Some general information to know is each sound of our language has a different range of ages in which your child should correctly produce the sound. By age 8, your child should be able to produce all sounds of the English language, unless second ...


4

One technique we were taught, that has helped me (but still has a long way to go, as I always talk too fast when presenting - just look at any of the videos of me online) is to treat full stops as breaths. Every time you hit a full stop, breathe. A full breath. This forces you to slow down, and it helps your thought processes. It works for kids - since I ...


4

Honestly, you are already doing most of what can be done about it, and even this tip isn't likely to make things a whole lot better. This is a common problem with this age group and up through the teen years. The best answer I found was to do what you are doing really - but consistently and refuse to understand when she doesn't slow down. Since she ...


4

Personally, I would definitely try to enforce the 'No English' rule at home, although realistically, I'm not sure you will be able to keep it for very long. I'll also second what JPmiaou wrote about using every chance to expose them to the minority languages, and taking comfort in the idea that they won't forget what they learn, even if they one day decide ...


3

Interesting question. I think you'd need to split up the question a little further. Most of my answers rely on Lise Eliot's book What's Going on in There, which I unfortunately returned to the library on Friday, so I'm only able to paraphrase the few things I remembered or made notes of. Will she be able to learn to speak another language? As you already ...


3

Peers count for a lot. You can expect them to talk like their peers. Ref. In Raising Bebe, the author had a funny story about her toddler learning to cuss (with French toddler cuss words) from her peers at pre-school. Modeling counts, while you can not expect them to understand immediately which contexts to use whqt, they will eventually use the right ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


2

My son is 2 in half and he had his tongue clipped today. He has been in speech therapy for 3 months before surgery. After his surgery his tongue was still num and as we was leaving Cody was eating a red popsicle and I noticed he was bleeding so I rushed him back inside. Cody was bitting on his tongue eating it. I didn't know what to do . So I popped my boob ...


2

There are entire countries where language switching is the norm, i.e. from sentence to sentence you switch among two or more languages. They do not get confused. People who are monolingual think speaking anything but one language is confusing because high school French was confusing for them. Children have been reported to prefer to speak one particular ...


2

I think this depends on the child to some extent. My older son never went through that stage at all; he went straight from using the verb alone ("go park") to using I ("I want to go to the park"). He (and his friends at daycare) did go through the you/I confusion as is common; it's possible 'my' is simply a variant of that. It's also possible "my" is ...


2

I speak Portuguese, my husband speaks French and we live in the US. The only language we have in common is English. Since we both can speak a tiny bit of each other's language( I more so than him), and since I am staying home mom, I try to speak all 3 of them to my son. It happens naturally depending on what I am talking about with my son. If I am trying to ...


2

This is a variant of the "both parents speak the minority language" model of bilingual childrearing, except with two minority languages, one for each parent. My sister and I grew up in the bilingual version, and I think its success definitely depended on the strict No Majority Language In The House rule that our parents enforced. Our friends from similarly ...


2

First of all, I wouldn't worry too much. Learning languages takes some time. It is often said that speech in bilingual kids can be delayed. Even if he is already fluent in his first and even his second language, he might just need some time to process a third one. It's a good sign that he understands German; give him some time, and the rest will follow. I ...


2

You are all missing out! AUDIOBOOKS! We all spend time in the car, we all need to concentrate on driving... Get audiobooks in the languages that your kid needs more exposure too. It turns out their language skills develop further if they hear the same language in several voices, rather than just your own...


2

My suggestion would be to not enforce it, but do 2 things: Don't generally speak English to him. If he speaks English, simply answer in Finnish/Japanese. Make a game out of it. When he starts learning new words, ask him what they are called in Finnish/Japanese. I think learning through playing is really useful to kids. My husband and I are both ...


2

Unless your daughter is learning disabled, all children have very good (mind bogglingly fantastic) language acquisitions skills-- in particular they can learn a language by mere exposure, which doesn't work for adults. Adults can be said to have a knack for picking up a 2nd or 3rd language-- usually not, adults study for years and still are incompetent--, ...


1

Well if you want your daughter to accelerate her english and an immersion school would help her learn at her own pace isn't that by definition the incorrect choice? If you want her to catch up in English then I do think a great standard school would work, you could also get her to a speech therapist. I am not sure what a French immersion school is, were ...


1

My guess is that your child will do fine. It takes effort to lean to speak, and up to now, understanding German has been enough. Daycare for the first three years does not exactly make a lot of linguistic demands on a child. I had a son who largely refused to speak his (only, native) language until well after the age his older brothers had. There was ...


1

No research (sorry!) but personal experience: I'd like to suggest that you take into account whether they are likely to need your languages (Fin/Jap) outside of your home? For instance, if you're in Britain, then knowing Finnish is a neat gimmick but hardly useful - unless you frequently visit (or have visitors from) Finland. Same for Japanese, of course. ...


1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...


1

Once she is old enough (depending on where you are, this is likely between 7th and 9th grades), enroll her in Speech and Debate. In Debate, talking fast is a big plus - but talking fast AND being understandable is absolutely crucial; and in other variants of speech, clarity and enunciation is very important. On top of that, it can be pretty fun, especially ...


1

My 5mnth old had hers done its been 24hrs and she bled quite abit so we had to stay until it stopped they used something to stop the bleeding-forget what its called.she was in pain all evening afterwards but nursed quite well i also noticed dark colored bowel movement which is not her norm but im almost certain its from swallowing blood.today it looks ...


1

I started my son at age 8, but wish I had done it earlier as it would have been even easier for him. He lapped it up, we were home edding at the time so I could choose exactly which lessons he did and how long we spent on each and when we did them, so I could cater for when he didn't feel like it. He then went to prep school in the UK for five terms, ...


1

balanced mama has a great suggestion, but given that "glue ear" affects children based on a number of factors (e.g. duration and recurrence) and that how it affects is also highly variable, this question doesn't lead to the ability to answer or provide a suggestion specific to your child's needs or more abstractly to "any 'ole child who has had glue ear"'s ...


1

Seek help in older relatives of child. Maybe a private lessons? Otherwise you have to learn that language, team up with other parents and try to teach by yourself. To complete my answer that's what my parents did. They invested what they could (time, money in books, computer software, private lessons, introducing me to natives) in me to later make me ...


1

When raising our baby, the changing table was one good place for practicing sound mimicry. I would make a sound, and she would try to imitate. We started with vowel sounds, then work on consonant sounds. Each time she figured out how to form her lips, teeth and tongue to make the sound correctly, I would respond with excitement and laughter. She loved it, ...



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