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25

Yes, I think that children's online activities should be monitored but I don't think it's feasible in practice except for very young children. Older kids will always find a way to circumvent your control -- but the good news is that they get more computer-literate in the process :-) To me it's the same as having someone supervise small children at the ...


18

"Porn" runs a wide gamut of idealized or fantasy scenarios. Many, if not most, of pornographic materials, portray intimate relations in a way that is not typical. I would imagine a pornographic movie that depicts the awkward "getting to know each other" phase, dating, and the social and emotional intimacy that most parents would hope their children would ...


13

Wish I could comment on some of the other answers, but I'm a noob, so I can't... Anyway, there's absolutely nothing wrong with posting your pictures, your names, all of it. Continuing to promote "stranger danger" and god-forbid-someone-gets-teased and god-forbid-someone-finds-out-about-our-mistakes philosophies is really just silly. Let's get over all that ...


10

In answer to my own question, this is one approach I've thought about, and it would be age dependent, so something like: 0-7 years, no unsupervised access. 8-13, unsupervised access allowed to a white list of sites, everything else blocked. 14-16, no blocking, but everything logged, so I can keep an eye on them. 16+, no blocking, no logging. (Presumably I ...


10

As an elementary school librarian, I was responsible for talking with students and parents about computer use. We focused a great deal about the very scary presence of predators on the internet. We encouraged parents to constantly talk with their children about what they are doing on the internet, who they are talking to, what sites they are visiting. I ...


9

Do you monitor the books they read from the library? Do you monitor the music they listen to on the radio? Do you monitor the TV and Movies they watch? Do you monitor what they say and hear from their friends? If so, then I'd say yes... it's just yet another stream of content. Honestly, the easiest way to monitor, is to put the computer in a communal space ...


9

For website templates I'd like to suggest asking on the excellent Wordpress SE site. But that's not really your point. A decade ago it seemed common to create photo websites about their offspring. Back then, a website for Junior looked like a cool and sweet thing to do. Several of my fellow geeks did this. None of their sites are still online. With all of ...


8

Porn is, even to adults, the junk food of sex; it is a complete fantasy, and while some of it may be plausible, the primary reason to watch porn is to see something you're not getting in your everyday life. While a certain amount of such escapism is normal and even healthy, it depicts activities that are typically more fun to do than to watch. A few genres ...


7

My policy is, you can post pictures without a name, or a name without a picture, but never together. Why? Because nothing can ever be removed from the Internet ever. It bugs me when people tag pictures of me with my name, or mention my kids online (but not enough to nag them about it). Information about me is mine to disclose or not, and I resent the fact ...


7

Here are some of my thoughts on the topic: What are the risks? Some freaks collect pictures for their own weird purposes. That's despicable but at least the real-life risk to your kids is so small as to be nonexistent. A bigger concern is, as has been said, schoolmates that use the pics for taunting and harassment. This can be really problematic and is ...


7

I would focus on the lying and sneaking around. As you have mentioned, you feel there is no way around the use of the programs. I, personally would talk to her about Facebook and have her account frozen - the user agreement on Facebook states that users must be 13. I would proceed with talks about trust. I think I would make her re-earn the right to use all ...


6

We set up an email account for my daughter at age 9 and a blog for her. We also invested a lot of effort educating her about anonymity and trust. Neither email nor blog use her personal name or give away any details other than the city she lives in. She actually chose to use a pseudonym. She has been taught to never post photos, never give away personal ...


6

The minimum age to use Facebook, per their terms of service, is 13: What is the minimum age required to sign up for Facebook? In order to be eligible to sign up for Facebook, people must be thirteen (13) years of age or older. The minimum age to use GMail and Google Accounts, per their terms of service, is also 13 (in the USA): Age ...


5

One thing that is possible, and happens often enough to be disturbing, is that someone may take your pictures and use them in marketing materials without your approval.


5

First of all, Gmail will allow you to 'delegate' email to another address. my 10 yo daughter has an email address that i delegated to my main gmail address. Dropdown at my name on the screen and i can open her mailbox. I do it regularly. Secondly, if you notified those services, they would delete or block the accounts. Not personally sure that would be my ...


4

I would also consider time caps like you would consider for television: perhaps 1-3 hours per day depending on the age. Would be glad to hear in the comments what caps parents are using and how are they enforcing them.


4

I use Trend Micro software on all of the computers in my house, which also includes internet filters. As suggested in other posts, I started out with very strict rules on which websites the computers could allow. My kids (now 12 and 10) each have their own logins so that I can set up different rules for each. We regularly discuss what types of sites they ...


4

Unfortunately a lot of the Internet is a 'Wild West' environment - you cannot completely prevent cyber bullying. That said, there are a number of options which can help. I'm guessing you are not a parent, but this topic is likely to be of interest to parents and children alike. Facebook has a specific anti-cyber-bullying team that you can report incidents ...


4

You use the same approach you would use for just about any other "how to protect my children" question. Step 1: educate yourself. The first thing you have to do is educate yourself. What does your child do online, and where are the risks they're going to face? If you have a good relationship with your child, you can ask them about it directly. You can ...


3

I'd advise against this. We created a blog soon after telling our friends and family that we were expecting. For the months during pregnancy, it proved to be popular with them, as they could keep up to date with progress etc. In the first year or so after baby was born, we posted pictures as she grew up. However, I came across one posted on another site ...


3

There's nothing inherently dangerous about it. Unless you live on some sort of secluded compound, strangers will probably figure out what she looks like when you go out in public. Just use common sense about what you reveal. "She loves to swing in our back yard at 123 Main Street while I take a nap every day" is probably not advisable. Yes, that's an ...


3

The main risk is that when you post, you are aware of the present context and can't link it to the future-- because the future doesn't exist yet. But computers can. Computer software can link a person's identity, the image of their face or name to every concept (website, blogpost tag, other people, ideas they express, actions they take, etc) they are seen ...


3

About.com listed some of the risks of posting your baby's photos online are: if your baby's photo is used with other means without your permission. There is a story of a girl who found out that her photo was used for a mobile company halfway around the world without her permission. Another family also found out that their family picture was used as a ...


3

There is always a risk with anything you do online. We have had a website for our family for eight years for the same reasons you list. Here are some precautions that we take. We don't use last names at all, ever. We don't label the pictures in any way. We don't advertise our website through email or other online modes of comunication. We directly gave the ...


3

I think we are actually already somewhat more dependent as we adapt with the times. For example, my parents made sure we had an encyclopedia set growing up. I will not likely go to the expense because between library access and all the info online it hardly seems worth it. At the same time, kids need to be taught how to look at a variety of sources to ...


3

I exposed myself to a lot of terrible things whilst growing up and spending a lot of time on the Internet - things that I feel still affect me today. I had absolutely no supervision on Internet access from the age of about 8, although I greatly wish I did so I might not have seen and done what I have. I believe the best solution is in putting the computer ...


3

Based on my comment on Beofett's post, some would say "well, look at you just defending porn." Yeah? So? Porn -- like sex, drugs, and rock n roll -- is a subject to be discussed with your kids. It's not to be taken lightly or assumed that it'll take care of itself in due course... that's honestly how babies get made. I grew up in suburbia and started ...


2

My son just turned 10. We got him an email account under the condition that we have his email address password as well. Of course, he can just delete stuff he doesn't want us to see as well, so even that is no real gated environment. I have no answers other than, as you state, we can try blocking and grounding but none of that actually works. So I think the ...


2

Proclaimer: I have no personal experience with raising children. I just have a big interest in it, am following some guru's at this topic in the Netherlands, exchanged thoughts with a teacher, and have thought about / shaped my own thoughts. You're making big steps in your own process here, that is great to see. On one hand you very confident in punishment ...


2

First of all +1 to the local library (while it still exists). Our town library is the cats meow: Huge CD collection, DVDs for $1/week, well organized kids section with regular events, graphic novels and edgy marvel comics to keep the teens interested, free internet access for those in need, and of course books, books, and more books. We used make a family ...



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