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Babies care about love. Talk to her/him. Hold their little hand, sing to her, read a story and continue to tell her how much you love her, every day. This gives her a sense of security.


5

I took my 12 month old on a short (but uneven / rocky) hike near Tahoe last year. If I were to do any sort of hiking again, I would definitely recommend the following: Wearable Baby Carrier with some sort of waist harness - I used the Baby Bjorn Mesh Baby Carrier Active for the hike. With the baby carrier properly adjusted I felt like my little one's ...


1

In my experience 5 months is a little early to even start trying to get a breastfed baby to sleep without the boob. That works better around 9 or ten months, if at all. (The nighttime feeding being the last my kids gave up, at age 13 months for my middle child and at 15 months for my youngest.) That being said, I do sympathize with your desire to help ...


2

There's not just one answer to that question, because it varies by the child and the situation. Could be 2-3 months, could be much longer (easily could be 6mo+). There's also a second issue with your question: 'waking up to nurse' versus 'waking up hungry'. If they're waking up actually hungry, then you need to feed them (or find a solution to feeding ...


0

I have twins that are still waking several times per night and they are 18 months now. We've spoke with different pediatricians and there are several causes (besides being hungry) like growing teeth, bad dreams, feeling the need to be close to the parents, etc. You can't do too much besides waiting for this period to finish. It's pretty hard to predict when ...


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Expose your child to bright light (like a clouded sky). Not too long, of course. A large percentage of people will sneeze when exposed to bright light. See photic sneezing.


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In our experience, it's very hard to get an infant to sleep without nursing if he/she is in the same room as Mommy, as the infant knows where the milk comes from. We didn't sleep train, but certainly when we needed to share a room (such as during hotel stays) it was much harder to get our sons to sleep as babies than when they were in a separate room. It ...


1

did your children behave the same way? One of ours did. Heck, her preferred sleeping position ranged from sleeping on her KNEES - with legs folded, head down, and butt up - to completely unnatural and painful looking something which resembled letter Z for lack of a better description, since well before 1YO can we somehow encourage more laying on her ...


1

He's going to eat enough, barring substantial physiological problems that it doesn't sound like apply here. This was true at one month old, is true now, and will be true at 3 or 4. Kids don't starve themselves, whatever their difficulties with appearing to eat a normal meal are. As long as you're not replacing those calories with candy or potato chips, so ...


2

Weaning is a personal choice for you and him. There is no magical date, but if you feel like he's ready and you're ready, then congratulations: you've done a great job. If you're concerned about how much he's getting, you could give him known quantities of expressed milk in a cup or bottle-- but since you've been feeding him for so long, you can probably ...


1

Sounds like he's trying to self soothe and needs help finding a healthy way to calm himself down. The hair pulling is likely a form of comfort and sensory stimulation. If you can't replace the habit with something safe, it's worth talking with your pediatrician about, since bezoars are dangerous. Maybe give him something else to chew on that is safer than ...


2

I think sitting up at this age is good for her - even if she's going to some extremes. One of the things that babies work on with sitting is their balance, and that's a precursor to walking (and crawling to some extent). It both helps them have a sense of balance, and helps strengthen their abdominal muscles, not dissimilar from an adult doing sit-ups. ...


4

Sometimes, when a baby learns something new (sitting, crawling, standing, walking) they want to do it ALL the time. They can even wake themselves up to do it at night, it is that exciting. did your children behave the same way? when sleeping, my babies would never just lay down when tired. They would cry, and when they could sit/stand do that. We had ...


-1

Well a good tip is to almost force you child not to. I do not mean to harm your child but for example lie down with the child and put you arm lightly over her stomach so she can't sit-up. Do it very lightly. Eventually if you continue to do that she will adapt.


1

I would talk to your pediatrician about this. At around 2 months my son would not sleep for more than an hour at a time if he was swaddled. The pediatrician said some babies are like that and if we can maintain a good room temperature through the night then we should stop swaddling. If the rocking is a full body rock she might not like the swaddle, if it ...


2

I think she may be hungry when this happens, but it's not enough to fully wake her because she's swaddled. The swaddle helps babies sleep longer because it suppresses the startle reflex. Without the swaddle she probably would wake crying for food. Not to mention, a 3mo definitely should still be waking for night feedings especially if she's breastfed. ...


2

Many babies like tactile sensations on their body when going to sleep, I personally think this is why so many children like a stuffed animal in the bed with them. There's nothing wrong with your baby doing that, maybe its a sign that your baby is seeking comforting sensations. A baby-safe stuffed animal (one that has no buttons or pieces that could be pulled ...


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Besides the other excellent answers on your question: there is a "feature" in our bodies that allows us to ignore hunger and thirst (to some extend) for the first few hours after waking up, presumably so we can go and hunt our breakfast without our stomach interfering. So the behavior of your child seems to be perfectly normal.


2

If your child is on the small side, you were probably told to feed him often. Ours were both under 6 pounds, and our pediatrician wanted them fed every two hours until they hit 10 pounds. Man, that was a long 4 months or so for my wife! After that, we fed them on an their schedule, and that was still at least once a night until maybe seven or eight months. ...


1

My child was very premature so I spent every single day for 5 months in a NICU and never heard a single doctor say you should wake your child during the night for any reason. They did say if your child sleeps a long time you should slip a bottle in their mouth at around 4-5 hours and let them eat in their sleep. The NICU doctors all said that sleep cycles ...


2

If your pediatrician has explicitly told you to wake your baby up, I think you should do that. However, the pediatrician should give you the exact amount of time your baby should have between feedings if that is the case, in my opinion. What I often hear is that you can't expect a baby to sleep through the night with no feedings before a certain age, and ...


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The La Leche League has a lot of info on tandem nursing. Their Tandem Nursing FAQ states: Some mothers express concern that their toddler may be taking milk meant to nourish their baby. These mothers may take comfort in the fact that breasts are marvelous things that can adjust their production to meet the demands placed upon them--if they are asked to ...


0

I am old school. I am also involved in special education. It is my opinion, that Babies need nutrition for brain development, learning & motor skills. If the baby is in the low percentile weight wise I would feed the baby and not let the baby go more than 7-8 hrs "at night" without a feeding. Infants need to be fed during the day, they need to learn days ...



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