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6

Beofett linked to a great answer above. Let me add a few observations of my own: First of all, what you plan is different from what you get. Many biological reasons can cause it to take a long time, even years, for the first baby to arrive. And there's no guarantee against such difficulties for the following babies, either. Or you might get two or three all ...


4

The La Leche League has a lot of info on tandem nursing. Their Tandem Nursing FAQ states: Some mothers express concern that their toddler may be taking milk meant to nourish their baby. These mothers may take comfort in the fact that breasts are marvelous things that can adjust their production to meet the demands placed upon them--if they are asked to ...


4

Sometimes, when a baby learns something new (sitting, crawling, standing, walking) they want to do it ALL the time. They can even wake themselves up to do it at night, it is that exciting. did your children behave the same way? when sleeping, my babies would never just lay down when tired. They would cry, and when they could sit/stand do that. We had ...


3

In our experience, it's very hard to get an infant to sleep without nursing if he/she is in the same room as Mommy, as the infant knows where the milk comes from. We didn't sleep train, but certainly when we needed to share a room (such as during hotel stays) it was much harder to get our sons to sleep as babies than when they were in a separate room. It ...


3

Recovery from the first birth Having back to back babies can take a hard toll on the mom's body. A few months post-partum her body has not had time to fully physically recover: “Studies show that there is a higher incidence of low birth-weight and premature birth when conception takes places within six months of a previous delivery,” Dr. Debra ...


2

If your pediatrician has explicitly told you to wake your baby up, I think you should do that. However, the pediatrician should give you the exact amount of time your baby should have between feedings if that is the case, in my opinion. What I often hear is that you can't expect a baby to sleep through the night with no feedings before a certain age, and ...


2

If your child is on the small side, you were probably told to feed him often. Ours were both under 6 pounds, and our pediatrician wanted them fed every two hours until they hit 10 pounds. Man, that was a long 4 months or so for my wife! After that, we fed them on an their schedule, and that was still at least once a night until maybe seven or eight months. ...


2

I think she may be hungry when this happens, but it's not enough to fully wake her because she's swaddled. The swaddle helps babies sleep longer because it suppresses the startle reflex. Without the swaddle she probably would wake crying for food. Not to mention, a 3mo definitely should still be waking for night feedings especially if she's breastfed. ...


2

We had our two children four years apart, and that has proven ideal for us, though each was much later what we originally wanted. They are separated enough to not compete, but close enough to be best friends (now 15 and 19). Plan to be flexible. Many people plan on having children at a particular time, and it just doesn't work out. Sometimes it just takes ...


2

Many babies like tactile sensations on their body when going to sleep, I personally think this is why so many children like a stuffed animal in the bed with them. There's nothing wrong with your baby doing that, maybe its a sign that your baby is seeking comforting sensations. A baby-safe stuffed animal (one that has no buttons or pieces that could be pulled ...


2

Weaning is a personal choice for you and him. There is no magical date, but if you feel like he's ready and you're ready, then congratulations: you've done a great job. If you're concerned about how much he's getting, you could give him known quantities of expressed milk in a cup or bottle-- but since you've been feeding him for so long, you can probably ...


2

Expose your child to bright light (like a clouded sky). Not too long, of course. A large percentage of people will sneeze when exposed to bright light. See photic sneezing.


2

I think sitting up at this age is good for her - even if she's going to some extremes. One of the things that babies work on with sitting is their balance, and that's a precursor to walking (and crawling to some extent). It both helps them have a sense of balance, and helps strengthen their abdominal muscles, not dissimilar from an adult doing sit-ups. ...


1

There's not just one answer to that question, because it varies by the child and the situation. Could be 2-3 months, could be much longer (easily could be 6mo+). There's also a second issue with your question: 'waking up to nurse' versus 'waking up hungry'. If they're waking up actually hungry, then you need to feed them (or find a solution to feeding ...


1

He's going to eat enough, barring substantial physiological problems that it doesn't sound like apply here. This was true at one month old, is true now, and will be true at 3 or 4. Kids don't starve themselves, whatever their difficulties with appearing to eat a normal meal are. As long as you're not replacing those calories with candy or potato chips, so ...


1

did your children behave the same way? One of ours did. Heck, her preferred sleeping position ranged from sleeping on her KNEES - with legs folded, head down, and butt up - to completely unnatural and painful looking something which resembled letter Z for lack of a better description, since well before 1YO can we somehow encourage more laying on her ...


1

My child was very premature so I spent every single day for 5 months in a NICU and never heard a single doctor say you should wake your child during the night for any reason. They did say if your child sleeps a long time you should slip a bottle in their mouth at around 4-5 hours and let them eat in their sleep. The NICU doctors all said that sleep cycles ...


1

I would talk to your pediatrician about this. At around 2 months my son would not sleep for more than an hour at a time if he was swaddled. The pediatrician said some babies are like that and if we can maintain a good room temperature through the night then we should stop swaddling. If the rocking is a full body rock she might not like the swaddle, if it ...


1

Sounds like he's trying to self soothe and needs help finding a healthy way to calm himself down. The hair pulling is likely a form of comfort and sensory stimulation. If you can't replace the habit with something safe, it's worth talking with your pediatrician about, since bezoars are dangerous. Maybe give him something else to chew on that is safer than ...



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