Hot answers tagged

16

This is absolutely normal - she has discovered a new toy: her voice. At this age she doesn't really know anything about the effect loud shouts can have on others. And even when you ask her to stop, that is only a short term thing. But this will come with time - I'd suggest keeping on doing as you are now. If you make too big a thing of it, sometimes ...


5

When they can roll over themselves, then it's ok to let them choose their own preferred sleeping position. Just be sure to use light-weight coverings, and when you put them to bed don't pull the covers up too far. If you live in a cold climate, put more clothes on the babies, rather than heavier coverings. At 7 months, it's safest if the babies can ...


5

Babies that age don't accurately display their emotions. Just because he smiles one day and not another day doesn't mean he was happier or less happy. One good way to know if your baby had a good day is by inquiring with the caregivers. Did he eat well? Sleep well? Etc.


3

We used to call one of my nephews The Pterodactyl Child, until we nipped that bud: Inside voice, please. (yes, even if sometimes we are outside) I only have one niece, so I may be off-base, but IME (and my mother's, who holds a masters degree in special education) females develop sooner and begin the "terrible twos" at around that age. Good luck :)


3

There is something you can do. Instead of only reacting with the "serious" look and "no", sometimes mimic her back! At times when it is least disturbing to others. It might be engaging and fun. And she might learn something even more, like when the shouting is more appropriate and fun, and when it ought to be toned down. Additional benefit: meaningful (to ...


2

Children that age learn new things everyday, some good some bad. Trust me it is only a phase and will pass soon. What you can do meanwhile is not give her extra attention when she shouts i.e. don't tell her it is bad or to stop, simply try to distract her with a toy she likes or a book or whatever else she likes. UPDATE: All the people advising a 'firm ...


2

To piggy back off of what was already said, kids don't really express emotions just yet, and at (I'm assuming) now 4 months, a baby is only just now beginning to become interactive. The short story is: Don't sweat it. If that's the only thing that's different, then your child is fine. As was said before, focus on the logistics of a child transitioning to ...


1

My answer works on excited adults too: speak very softly to her and she'll speak softly too. Kids learn by mimicry. As soon as she's old enough to understand you can add; "the people over there don't want to hear that" or (my favourite) "that baby over there wants to sleep, please don't be so loud".


1

This is very normal. However, in my experience, your plan will likely not work out. The problem is not her screaming, it's her disobedience. If she stops screaming but continues to grow in disobedience, you will likely still be displeased. Fortunately, there is something else you can do. If you oppose corporal punishment on principal, ignore this answer. I ...


1

I used the baby bjorn carrier with my daughter and never had a problem. I will say that in the summer time I just put her in a short sleeve onesie and that was it. All babies are different though. Your baby maybe a little bit bigger than my daughter was, when I used it and maybe his tummy rubs more on the the carrier while you're walking, causing friction ...


1

One of my twins did the same thing at that age. Just put them to bed on their back and if they roll over, they roll over. Not much you can really do about it.


1

My youngest son slept on his belly and so did my oldest daughter. I just made sure there was no pillow or loose sheets were near their faces and only allowed them to do so when their cribs were close to my bed.


1

Crush tums into powder inside a zip lock baggy using a wooden spoon to crush til it's powder. Put a pinch in baby's mouth if he or she seems to be in pain after eating. If baby calms down then you know that was likely the problem. Works like a charm for my son.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible