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11

As @Stephie pointed out in the comments, the definition of tattletale can be a little ambiguous. I think many parents encourage their children to come to them for help in resolving an issue, but don't want their children "informing on" siblings or playmates at every opportunity. For example, Susie and Johnny are playing. They get into a disagreement, and ...


6

First of all, you must check your country's laws. In Poland it's illegal to leave children without supervision when they're under 7 years old (there are several exceptions though). You should allow your kids to go out alone as soon as possible, but not sooner than they're ready:) And if and only if you are ready for that. I think it is important for the ...


6

You might try incentives. Set a schedule and use a loud timer to mark the milestones. "Timer's running...five minutes til teeth have to be brushed." Timer goes off, are teeth brushed? If so, one milestone reached. "Timer is on again, ten minutes to eat your breakfast..." You will be helping the younger two reach their milestones, true, but that's not ...


5

I had the same problem and with a similar age grouping ( 9, 5 and 3). I more or less solved the problem by tackling two different issues. The first one is the child's focus. In my case, making my older aware of the fact that with age comes responsibility, and that as the older brother he has to help us with his siblings. With the understanding that greater ...


5

I was horse crazy since I was old enough to read books about horses. Any child is old enough to ride (I got my own horse when I was sixteen, and taught my four year old sister to ride on my horse, my kids learned to ride when they were seven and eight) but in order to be old enough to be the primary caregiver for a horse a child must have a strong sense of ...


3

I really like this resource here for information about how to help your child with the bedwetting problem: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/ss/slideshow-bedwetting. A more personal note on bedwetting - the last time that I wet my bed was when i was 16 years old. There were not physical problems, and I was not being lazy or stupid. I simply slept right ...


3

I sometimes feel conflicted and depressed about not being their father. [...] I feel like I can't get any recognition for fulfilling that role because I am "just a brother". Question your mindset: Stopp feeling depressed about what you are not. Instead feel awesome about what you are. You are not "just a brother", you are the older brother, who ...


2

Ok, we've found an answer that borrows from the suggestions here. Step one, have a talk with him / her about responsibility (I really liked Jeff Y's approach of placing him in charge on occasions to teach him that it's not easy). While framing the problem and it's seriousness, work directly with them to try and find a solution, stressing the importance of ...


2

I would suggest exploring deeper to get to specific fears, and address those individually. For example, she may be afraid: Her friends will smell her room. Her friends will find her diapers, clean sheets, plastic sheets, etc. Her brother will rat her out. She will be invited to sleep over. You can work together to find solutions to all those things, to ...


2

Riding Do start with lessons at a local riding school with appropriately sized ponies. A kid can start riding as early as 2 years of age (when they can sit upright), but many places that offers lessons have requirements that are usually between 4 and 8 years of age for lessons. When you go look for a place, look for a place that: the horses look well ...


2

My understanding of being a tattle-tale is entirely subjective in that it depends on the emotional maturity of the child engaging in the behavior. I would define a tattle-tale as one who seeks an authority figure to resolve an issue that the individual should be able to resolve without the intervention of such a person. What is tattle-taling for a ...


1

Well, one reason for sure is that "Nobody likes a rat!" ;) To give that a bit more context I would suggest at various ages, if the child has not got over the inclination to talk to authority figures about what other people are doing, they may end up ostracized, bullied or otherwise in an unhealthy situation. You just don't know, and can't trust, the ...


1

I'd say let him play on his own as much as he wants to. Make sure he can come and get you guys if he gets distressed, but if he's happy, there's no problem. If he never engaged in social play with adults, or only when adults forced him to, then that could be a sign of a developmental issue. But if he absolutely refused to play alone ever, that would also be ...



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