Hot answers tagged

6

You might try incentives. Set a schedule and use a loud timer to mark the milestones. "Timer's running...five minutes til teeth have to be brushed." Timer goes off, are teeth brushed? If so, one milestone reached. "Timer is on again, ten minutes to eat your breakfast..." You will be helping the younger two reach their milestones, true, but that's not ...


5

I had the same problem and with a similar age grouping ( 9, 5 and 3). I more or less solved the problem by tackling two different issues. The first one is the child's focus. In my case, making my older aware of the fact that with age comes responsibility, and that as the older brother he has to help us with his siblings. With the understanding that greater ...


5

I was horse crazy since I was old enough to read books about horses. Any child is old enough to ride (I got my own horse when I was sixteen, and taught my four year old sister to ride on my horse, my kids learned to ride when they were seven and eight) but in order to be old enough to be the primary caregiver for a horse a child must have a strong sense of ...


3

I sometimes feel conflicted and depressed about not being their father. [...] I feel like I can't get any recognition for fulfilling that role because I am "just a brother". Question your mindset: Stopp feeling depressed about what you are not. Instead feel awesome about what you are. You are not "just a brother", you are the older brother, who ...


3

I really like this resource here for information about how to help your child with the bedwetting problem: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/ss/slideshow-bedwetting. A more personal note on bedwetting - the last time that I wet my bed was when i was 16 years old. There were not physical problems, and I was not being lazy or stupid. I simply slept right ...


2

Ok, we've found an answer that borrows from the suggestions here. Step one, have a talk with him / her about responsibility (I really liked Jeff Y's approach of placing him in charge on occasions to teach him that it's not easy). While framing the problem and it's seriousness, work directly with them to try and find a solution, stressing the importance of ...


2

I would suggest exploring deeper to get to specific fears, and address those individually. For example, she may be afraid: Her friends will smell her room. Her friends will find her diapers, clean sheets, plastic sheets, etc. Her brother will rat her out. She will be invited to sleep over. You can work together to find solutions to all those things, to ...


2

Riding Do start with lessons at a local riding school with appropriately sized ponies. A kid can start riding as early as 2 years of age (when they can sit upright), but many places that offers lessons have requirements that are usually between 4 and 8 years of age for lessons. When you go look for a place, look for a place that: the horses look well ...


2

Reading is the best practice for spelling. My suggestion is to not focus so hard on "spelling" practice, like it's its own discipline. Reading, writing, and spelling are all part of the same set of skills. Have your child read books out loud to you casually while you sit on the couch. You don't have to really pay attention, but if you hear the child ...


1

My son developed a sense of independence at around the same age. Our pediatrician told us it was normal. He rarely cries when he's frustrated, but the frustration clearly shows on his face. My strategy is to praise him for his efforts. When I help him, I try to guide him with broadly applicable advice. For example, when he tries to force Duplo blocks ...


1

The author here has the following suggestions: Create a set of flashcards. Create a second set of flashcards with the definition of the word on it. Use both sets of flashcards to play spelling Memory. Use alphabet magnets or Scrabble tiles to spell out each word. Write the word list on a piece of construction paper. Then cut the words apart into strips. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible