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52

TL;DR: It is not possible to conclude that a vaccine will have no negative effects on health, but it is clear that the net effect of vaccines is positive. Most of the talk lately has been about how the evidence for a link between autism and MMR vaccination is fraudulent. So, there is no scientific research that demonstrate that contemporary vaccines are ...


23

First of all, you state: I realize that vaccines are a controversial topic, That is not exactly correct in a legitimate sense. The only "controversy" is manufactured. Most, if not all, the things said about vaccines by the anti-vax pro-disease folks are lies. Competent and ethical practitioners of medicine all support vaccines. To specifically ...


22

None, really. There are, on the other hand, strong arguments for immunisation: namely, it helps prevent terrible illnesses.


19

Some people believe that obtaining the virus naturally provides better levels of immunization than you would get from the vaccine, as evidenced by the requirement for a second "booster" shot if you opt for the vaccine, or the possibility of still catching the disease even after receiving the vaccine (it is worth noting that infection after immunization is ...


14

I very highly recommend the book Bad Science by Dr. Ben Goldacre. It is very relevant to your question and addresses some of the concerns you may have about Immunization. It is also a very good book about understanding the difference between Scientific Research results and how they are published in the Media.


10

According to the CDC, you should look for... any unusual condition, such as a high fever, weakness, or behavior changes. Signs of a serious allergic reaction can include difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness. If that's what you're seeing, I hope you called a doctor right after posting ...


10

My original answer (below) was correctly pointed out by beofett not to answer the OP's question. I made a different logical consstruction, which I stand by, and was critical of the lack of decision making in leaving the child not vaccinated, but I missed the actual question. So, I will answer it directly. Question: vaccinate or deliberately expose? Answer: ...


8

So, chicken pox parties, eh? Pro: You get to stay home from work for a week to care for a sick child. Oh, and you and your kid get to go to a party. And no scary needles are involved. Con: Your child will feel like shit and itch like crazy for a week.


7

The question does not specify which immunizations specifically. Some vaccines are virtually harmless except for the common side-effects and very rare but serious reactions. But other vaccines are unnecessary or at least not as important as others because they are for diseases that are mild or virtually non-existent. It's no different than drugs. What are ...


7

I would not spend a lot of time and effort "preparing" him - that way you risk building it up in his mind into a big scary thing. A huge part of pain perception is to do with psychological state and expectations of pain - if you expect something to hurt, it will hurt more than if you don't. So: don't mention it until the day, or even until you're setting ...


5

The key to lessening pain of a vaccination is not to tense up your muscles. I had my kids practice "make your arm soft" and poke them with my finger. It's easy to demonstrate that a simple finger poke hurts more on a tense arm than a soft one. Then just as the doctor or nurse approaches their arm with the needle, remind them "make your arm soft" and it ...


5

There was a report recently that chicken pox vaccine sharply reduced deaths from chicken pox in US. We think that chicken pox is not dangerous but before the vaccine there were around 100 deaths and 11,000 hospitalizations per year. This seems to be pretty convincing.


5

No. The only well known study showing a link (Wakefield) was subsequently exposed as fraudulent. This is discussed in more detail at Skeptics SE: http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/607/are-there-any-other-studies-besides-the-discredited-wakefield-studies-that-have


4

Here is the only medical research that I am aware of that connects immunizations with earlier onset of seizures in this disorder: http://www.onmedica.com/newsarticle.aspx?id=e7c292a8-9949-4a65-91f1-3a80d51a7f3b This article emphasizes that the immunization does not cause the disease, but it does appear to cause it to manifest earlier. FYI: Here is a link ...


4

First, you need to calm down about it yourself. Children cue off their parents' reactions. If you're freaked out, he will be too. The mildest disease is 100 times worse than a shot. Second, don't lie about what it will be like, or else every time you go to a doctor he will expect the worst. Tell him the facts without either sensationalizing or ...


3

I'm an adult who has never had Chicken Pox. I'm also vaccination-resistant, as I found out when I had my daughter, and discovered that not only was I now susceptible to chicken pox, but also to measles, mumps, rubella, and polio. While pregnant, I couldn't get any boosters, so I was dependent on crowd immunity. If your child got chicken pox, and you weren't ...


2

When I need an annual flu shot or other vaccination, I like to bring my son with me (schedule permitting) so he can watch. Seeing me go through it, understand that we all have to do it, and that it's not a big deal or especially painful, makes it less of an anxiety when he needs to have one himself. We also discussed often (even at age 4) the purpose of ...


2

In addition to Karl's point, most people have a reaction to vaccines. It is just more worrying when it is a child as it can be so difficult to gauge seriousness. Common reactions, as j.rightly said, include fever, loss of appetite, and being tired. If anything else happens, call the doctor - but also, call them if you are worried at all by anything out of ...


2

I remember reading when the vaccine for chicken pox first came out, that there were worries that it might lead to Shingles later in life. Real chicken pox is proven to be a cause of Shingles later in life. So until someone proves the vaccine can definitely cause Shingles, I'd go with it and the maybe rather than the real disease and the proven possibility. ...


2

I'd absolutely opt for exposing my child to chicken pox directly rather than getting him the vaccine if we knew anyone who had it. Chicken pox doesn't cause any of the other infections warned against in Boeffet's answer. (Hint: bacterial infections are caused by bacteria, not viruses.) I'm all for immunizing my child against things that can kill or ...


2

PRO: NO SHINGLES According to the CDC, Almost 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster. There are an estimated 1 million cases each year in this country. Anyone who has recovered from chickenpox may develop shingles; even children can get shingles. However the risk of disease ...


1

I will answer the question directly in a mo, but first an anecdote. My oldest sons (20,18 as of this writing) had the 'pops'. When the 18 was 3, he got it before the mother of the 20 and I got married. So we got them together and they both dealt with it. That was 1995. By 2005 it was a STATE REQUIRED (Missouri) immunization for my then 4yo to get into early ...


1

The short of it is that there is none. The study that claimed a link between MMR and autism was fraudulent. The current theory is that autism is the result of an autoimmune disease, related to rheumatoid arthritis, MS, Crohn's Disease, etc (in fact, it's known that a mother with RA or a family history of same places that woman at a greater risk for having a ...



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