Hot answers tagged

56

Babies/children build up their immune systems by being exposed to germs and dirt. Keeping them away from germs and dirt actually gives them a weaker immune system. (http://www.webmd.com/parenting/d2n-stopping-germs-12/kids-and-dirt-germs) This is not to say that you should bring your baby hang out with plague victims. Some germs (mold etc) can make baby ...


31

Step 1: See a dentist, have cavities treated asap. Yes, these teeth will fall out, but until then, they act as placeholders for the permanent teeth. There are also sources that claim the deciduous teeth are important for the development of the permanent teeth. (Which will start to appear at around five to seven, that's quite different between kids.) And ...


23

(Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, your doctor or your girlfriend's doctor) It is possible that your girlfriend is experiencing postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The hormonal changes during and after pregnancy are associated with multiple mental health issues, most prominent postpartum depression, but also the lesser known postpartum anxiety and ...


12

We have a 3.5 year old with a similar problem. We took him to a dentist who gave us a $2000+ recommendation, 4 root canals. We went to get a second opinion. The second dentist suggested we do the following: No sugar. This means no juice, no chocolate milk, no candy, etc. Brush after each meal, make certain the decaying teeth get brushed. This can be hard ...


12

Ask yourself: How do children experience their world? Most languages have words like "grasp", that mean to understand something and to touch it. Good schools/educators try to incorporate as many sensory channels and as many different ways to teach as possible. In my child's primary school letters and numbers are taught by having the children walk the ...


11

Generally speaking anywhere that you can go, your 10-month-old can go too. So really it's about weighing up risk and reward, a task which absolutely lacks black and white distinctions. Obviously if you're letting them explore at all then you need to be aware of your surroundings and your child's capabilities; for example if there are any trip hazards or ...


6

I can't imagine this is a diaper related problem, but I can see a new parent having some relevant circumstances change: You're around children you want to protect from germs You're around children that are constantly making messes You may have your hands in water more from giving baths or hand washing baby bottles, dishes or clothes 1 & 2 mean you ...


6

In general you should try to make sure the items a child puts in their mouth are somewhat clean. This doesn't mean "sterile". A single accidental chewing will be low risk, but repeated chewings of different items increases the risk. You ask about risks, so here's a list: The item might be carrying a parasite. One common parasite (common in domesticated ...


5

I think this is a great idea. Although I'm not near a national park, generally speaking it's not much different than letting them play in the backyard. Doctor's typically recommend a certain amount of sun exposure for infants anyway, vitamin D, etc. If you're going to supervise her, which of course you will, then let her have a ball. I wouldn't recommend ...


5

See WebMD: In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize baby bottles. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary. Unless your water supply is suspected to harbor contaminated bacteria, it is as safe for your baby as it is for you. There is no reason to sterilize what is ...


5

There's multiple things that should be done to address it, from education to seeing a dentist. A child not brushing their teeth, in and of itself, doesn't cause tooth decay... the bacterial waste from specific types of compounds, such as sugar, are what causes the decay (in conjunction with acidic food items which dissolve enamel). Everyone likes sweet ...


4

Most folks aren't extraordinarily dirty, so bath water won't get too nasty. Actually, the opposite issue occurs when the soap remains in the water/on your skin when you get up to dry off. A shower can use less water if you don't shave or brush teeth in it. You can buy a cut off valve for $5 at a hardware store to cut flow of water in shower if you do to ...


4

Like Martin, I think Dave's answer is the correct one --too sterile an environment has been convincingly shown to be harmful. However, I think it's also important to understand this from your girlfriend's point of view. This kind of paranoia is very common among first-time parents, so try to be understanding of her, she's just doing what she thinks is ...


4

On top of Dave Clarke's answer (which is the answer in my opinion), I would suggest that you and your girlfriend look at other people's kids of different ages and talk to their parents. My wife and I could tell you stories of all the disgusting things our kids licked and chewed, and they survived fine to be (so far!) well-adjusted teenagers.


4

We started taking our daughter on hikes when she was about 3 months old. Seriously, the most danger is the drive to/from the park and sun burn (getting a kid to wear sunglasses is hard, but a very good idea--essential if you are at elevation, along with a hat). A child w/o sunglasses can burn their cornea in a half hour of playing in the snow at 6,000' ...


3

I had a similar issue with my son. My right thumb would crack to to point of bleeding. Moving from soap to non-soap cleaners (like Sorbolene) helped a little. I started using disposable gloves when changing him, this also helped. Eventually, I had to start using a mild cortisone steroid cream (1%) - this helped a lot. I saw a dermatologist who referred to ...


3

You might try getting a long shower hose attachment so that he has more control about where the water goes. That way he will be able to wash his body without water getting on his face. After a while he will probably start experimenting with allowing water to touch his face. Everyone is able to be bolder when they feel they are in control of the situation. ...


3

My daughter seems to like shoving her hand down her diapers. She is a scratch fan so she just tears up her skin unless we block her with a onesie. They make them for larger kids too: www.special-need-products.com They look like normal shirts so he shouldn't appear strangely to anyone. Just that when he does decide to give the toilet a try he will need extra ...


3

It's important that your doctor wash their hands, but less important than you might think. As a health care provider, I wash my hands before examining every patient, but it's out of respect for the patient's feelings, not because my hands are particularly dirty (I wash my hands after every patient encounter. I'm unlikely to bring you that patient's germs.) ...


3

If doctors take issue with being asked to wash hands, patients are not to feel responsible for hurting their feelings as long as they ask in a respectful way. It's the patient's right. A little awkward discussion in the room is far less harmful than an infection. Most doctors will be happy to wash up. They know it's part of their job. If they are ...


3

As explained by Gruber's answer, sterilizing the bottles is usually completely unnecessary. However, there is a risk of buildup of harmful germs if the bottles are left to stand for too long with (rests of) milk inside. So while sterilizing is probably not required, you should wash them regularly and thoroughly, and refrigerate the milk as soon as possible. ...


3

Some old rule I remember some old person telling me was to boil all the stuff in hot water every week but only on saturdays. In my local language saturday is cleaning day. The other days the stuff would just get cleaning like the other dining utensils. But if the doctor has advised other treatment, than that should be followed. A way to sanitize sensitive ...


2

Make sure your child's toothpaste contains fluoride and use the amount recommended on the tube. Establish twice-daily tooth-cleaning as non-negotiable. If all else fails, do it by force. This may be very difficult but if you persevere, your child will come to accept it. With a bit of luck you can think of better ways to get it done. Here are a few ...


2

For a child who is potty trained, or at least is physically ready for potty training (often happens around two, but it varies significantly), this is approachable in a very simple way: ask him to use the toilet prior to the bath. At some point, often around potty training, this will become voluntary for many chlidren - like our three year old - who is ...


2

From experience, there are 6 main problems that may cause this: Psychological: fear of inhaling water. This can be addressed by showing how to hold breath and breathe out; and only have head under shower for brief (10-20 second) intervals. Unpleasant feeling of water getting into ears. This can be addressed by either using swimmer's gear to plug the ears ...


2

I wouldn't see any problem using a natural product like cleansing milk on a child. Just remember if she gets it in her eyes it will sting which is why most people use baby products. Another option is to make your own "Face wipes" to use on her that can be as natural as you want. It will also help with getting the clothes wet. If you search for "make your ...


1

The only solution I can think of is to get a bucket of water and give him a sponge bath. It may not be the best solution but it is the only one i can think of. Hope it helps.


1

I know it sounds simple, but have you tried just explaining to them why you want them to take shorter showers? It's not guaranteed to work, but for some teenagers, giving a reason for a rule is better than giving the actual rule - knowing that hot water is limited, that everyone else's time needs to be accounted for, and that their own limited time is ...



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