Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I'd like to help her in dealing with her giftedness. I can relate. As you discovered, as a child, a little boredom in school won't kill anyone is not true. Being chronically bored in school can be excruciating, and the feeling of isolation can be permanently damaging -- hence, the tremendous anxiety you feel, and the loving desire you have to ...


1

Mr Rogers taught children in his television programs that they do not have to share. In other words, children should not be forced to share something that they prefer to keep private. Perhaps it would be helpful for you if, in your own internal thinking about your daughter's reading, you concentrated on feeling joyful for your daughter about her discovery ...


1

Originally, the definition for childhood IQ was to test the child for various abilities, and then compare it with the scores of the averages of different age groups. The child's mental age would be the age in the population that had the closest average score to the child. Divide the child's mental age by their real age, and multiply by 100. So you can get a ...


1

I don't know if this will help but I have a daughter of a very similar age with some similar characteristics. What strikes me about your daughter is reading and arithmetic. I've certainly not witnessed any children either reading or doing any form of arithmetic at this age. My daughter is currently 2 years and 5 months, she can: Count from 1 to 10 in ...


1

Considering the link in your comment: http://www.bownet.org/BESGifted/brightvs.htm, what I got from that is not the difference between "gifted" and "bright" but rather the difference between "observant" and "curious". My brother and I are like this. I am the "curious" type (what you'd call gifted) and my brother is the "observant" type (what you call ...


2

Classifying your daughter seems very important right now, but consider the consequences of that classification. Success from hard work reinforces a work ethic whereas success from intelligence fosters the view that challenges result from the lack of intelligence. Intelligence is an intrinsic property whereas humility, persistence, empathy and kindness are ...


1

Bribes Bribes appear to work rather well with children. They need to be short term, realistic and believable. Deserts are a good reward for eating nicely, but perhaps are too long term for schoolwork. Find out what motivates your chid Different children are motivated by different things. Some you might want to consider: money iPad time stars stickers ...


1

Is she meeting your local school system's expectations for literacy? If so, I'd say that her reading skills are more an interesting peculiarity than something to make a big deal about. I don't think it is the parent's job to quiz or test a kid about his or her skills, unless there is a concern that the kid is having issues. It is generally considered that ...


3

I'd recommend looking into the work of Ellyn Satter (a known child nutritionist with lots of experience on child eating issues and child obesity). In short, her (scientifically documented) theory is that controlling kids portions can lead to a distorted view of food and portion control. Kids have the inborn ability to stop eating when they are full until ...


2

You may or may not consider me "gifted". I was halfway through the fourth grade curriculum when I finished first grade (I had an awesome first grade teacher who encouraged me to work ahead. My family is still friends with her 18 years later). The school wanted me to skip straight to the fourth grade, but my parents decided to keep me with my age group so I ...


4

The widely used WAIS intelligence test has a version for children that can be taken from the age of 2 and a half; any professional psychologist should be able to administer this test. Also, if there are no special schools for gifted children in your area, try to find a school that allows bright children to skip a year. It's a simple but apparently effective ...


8

I was "gifted." By the second grade, I was so bored with school that my teacher thought I was learning disabled! Fortunately, my school principal was wise. She tested me, then immediately skipped me to the next grade, then a few months later transferred me to the hardest teacher (the "mean" teacher, LOL). That helped a lot (for a few years, anyway -- ...


3

I'm the father of a 2 year old and I can't understand if she's gifted or just very bright. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellectual_giftedness: There is no generally agreed definition of giftedness for either children or adults, but most school placement decisions and most longitudinal studies over the course of individual lives have been ...


9

It's most likely too early to tell. If you could tell, it would depend greatly on how she is learning the things she knows. Children's brains at that age have an extraordinary capacity for repeating things they observe, but mere remembering and repetition doesn't mean true understanding is happening. For example, if she is learning to read new words from ...


13

I'm not sure the difference between gifted or not is important to your actual question, which seems to be how to keep your girl learning and wanting to learn. Your primary concern, that she will be bored of school and hate going, happens even with non-gifted students. Right now, everything she learns is fun - like a game. Learning is "playing", and she ...


21

(I'm going to focus on how to help her, rather than determining if she's gifted according to an external set of criteria.) Whether your daughter is considered "gifted" according to the person/methodology used to test this, go ahead & TREAT her as if she's gifted. In other words, do what you're doing now: spend time with her, help her find things she ...


4

Before you can figure out what to do about it, you need to understand the root cause. Maybe she's shy about receiving praise. I'm a 56 year old man so obviously not the same situation, but I get uncomfortable when people compliment me. I just really don't like praise. Especially if it's drawn out. Maybe she feels like she's being asked to perform and ...


0

Step 1: Give her any book to read on her own and then ask her basic questions on it like "What are the names of the characters?" and "What is the book about?" This will help her to feel more confident in her reading ability. Step 2: Keep repeating step 1 using different books until you think she is more confident. Step 3: Try asking her how to spell ...


1

My wife actually sent me this link on raising smart kids. I think the principles here translate very well into your situation. The focus of the article is on training yourself not to tell your kids they're smart. Instead, it focuses on teaching them a method to figure out how to accomplish things and seek greater challenges. Things like this for praise: ...


-1

To me, the Jewish identity is not just about obeying the Torah verbatim. It's mostly about the community and the cultural identity. The community is very tight-knit, of course, which is one of its strengths. It seems clear to me that rote obedience to ancient prescriptions is not what most Jewish people consider fundamental to being Jewish. I went to a ...


0

Watch David Attenborrough's nature shows a family staple. We used to gather on the big bed with a computer and watch them together. There are dozens, many on Netflix. My oldest is now studying conservation biology in college. Just coincidence? Maybe . . . .


2

The obvious "con" with this approach is that the child is going to realize that you're setting the performance bar for receiving dessert arbitrarily. As soon as they work a little bit harder, they might get dessert once, but the next day you'll just raise the bar again like in Catch-22. Then the child will realize that only rational thing to do is to ...


0

I wouldn't sweat it. Although my wife and I constantly 'dangle the carrot' (weekend video games, friends coming over etc.), I look at meal time as a time to enjoy each other's company and reconnect at the end of the day. Making her part of the enjoyment conditional on her work builds tension and holds her to a different standard than you do (do you get the ...


3

"For me there has been no serious difficulty in reconciling the principles of true science with the principles of true religion, for both are concerned with the eternal verities of the universe." - Henry Eyring, chemist These words from Dr. Eyring have motivated me in my own life as I simultaneously pursue a Ph.D. in astrophysics while being very active in ...


6

Wonderful question! If you can steer away from the dogma that the written Word is literal truth (with all the contortions you have to go through to reconcile internal inconsistencies), you can focus on the bigger picture. Science and exploration comes naturally to small children. Fill a balloon with helium and watch it float up. Plant seeds or bulbs in the ...


0

It strikes me that discussion of science and religion, while seeking out different kinds of truth, need not get wrapped up in questions of certainty and belief, at least not in the first place. First, both religious faith and science involve radical kinds of doubt: faith without doubt is pretty empty (no 'leap') and science without doubt is just incoherent. ...


0

To answer the part of your question about how should you teach science and help engender a passion for science in your kids, I would suggest that focus on science as experimentation and investigation of the world we live in. What happens when we add this to that, count how long between thunder and lighting. What falls faster, a feather or a leaf. How big ...


11

Science is a tool. Whether it is good or bad depends on who wields it. For all the controversy, things that allegedly conflict between science and religion rarely come up in practice. Personally, I find an evolutionary process to be a rather logical way to effect a creation for someone with infinite time and insight. Even if I didn't, I had to spend all ...


5

Science and religion need not be in conflict. You may be able to teach your children that science and religion both have parts to play in teaching people about life, the world, and the nature of God. There is no need for religion to teach one about the nature of molecules, nor is there need for science to teach about the nature of sin or spiritual ...


18

I personally don't think that science is inimical to faith and faith-based values. It can be a magnificent way to explore the intricacies of creation. You're probably versed in Ancient Near Eastern culture. There is nothing deceitful about a God who communicates with His people in a way they can understand, and in the ANE, that was through stories. ...


39

Rest assured that science and religion are not neccessarily a contradiction. Some of the best scientists of past and present time were deeply religious - and came from different religious backgrounds. As one commenter wrote, Georges LemaƮtre being one relatively modern example. The question of how to connect religious beliefs and teachings and scientific ...


7

The first issue is that kids that age don't think that far into the future. Something that happens several hours away isn't motivating for them. It needs to be more immediate. Otherwise, it feels to them like they were forced to do things they didn't want to all day, then to top it all off on a completely unrelated note, they don't get dessert either. ...


2

I don't think dessert can be a valid motivation at all. It teaches child to value food to much and can lead to issues in the future.



Top 50 recent answers are included