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27

The Cons These must be considered, but please make sure to read the Pros as well. For us, they make the disadvantages well worth it. Restraints on Parents. Learning outside of a school environment can consume a lot of mom or dad's time. Most people probably picture that time being spent at the kitchen table with textbooks and worksheets, but from what ...


22

These are the things that the Montessori school our son attends looks for; note that these are not things you'd expect a two-year old to already be fully competent in, more that these are a good sample of the items that they measure in their report card: knowing directions (up, down, besides, in front of, behind, etc) body parts (arm, elbow, wrist, eyes, ...


22

In a related question, a user linked this article. It might be relevant to your concerns about the social implications of home schooling. However, if your child enjoys his current school, then I would suggest simply adding in in-home supplemental education. Allow your child to pick subjects (or suggest a list of possible subjects, if you'd like), and do ...


15

I was a "gifted" kid growing up in a place where there wasn't much for me. I made it my mission for awhile after that to learn as much about gifted education as I could. There's only so much that traditional formal education can do for a really bright kid: traditional educational models are heavily rote, which is anathema to the active gifted mind. To ...


14

Hah this is a really good and old question. Let me tell you something else first... School for a bright kid is not about teaching. And not about learning because if he is as bright and vivid as you say he will learn everything himself. A school for a child like him, is about learning the hard way in life unfortunately. It is about learning discipline. ...


13

Well, formally speaking, I'm not in a parenting role but am gifted myself (16 y/o, from Israel). Just thought I'd give some input from my experience in that age. In the third grade I was accepted into a special program for gifted children at my school, where we learned all the subjects at a quicker pace but that wasn't the great part. The great part was that ...


13

The idea of children socializing one another is absurd -- I wish our society would get over it. As adults, it is our job to teach children how to behave socially -- otherwise you get The Lord of the Flies. That said, there are many other priceless lessons a child (especially a homeschooled child) learns from organized activity outside the home: How to ...


13

There are many reasons for prioritizing social development over academics. Just letting kids be kids-- learning social skills in an environment where they feel accepted-- is a critical part of development. If your child is happy at their current school, and their friends are nice kids - easy going, well mannered, the type of personalities that you don't ...


10

You will not be able to teach a newborn baby very much! For many, many months, your child is going to be learning fundamentals like how to eat, how to focus eyes properly, how to roll over... you've got years to prepare for a solid homeschooling curriculum, so you do not need to have all the pieces in place by July. You can certainly do things to keep an ...


9

The most important thing you need to homeschool your child is an adult who can spend the hours of 9am-3pm with the child. This is also the requirement with the longest lead time. Some of the ways people are able to arrange this include: be a 2-adult family, one works for income and the other homeschools the children be a 2-adult family, one works days and ...


8

From moving various schools myself when I was younger I would say that changing schools is a very big upset to learning - the child takes time to make new friends, settle in, understand the new curriculum etc. If you can supplement their learning at home I would recommend doing that - being a teacher you will probably be in a good place here to see what ...


7

If you have some time to spend teaching your children yourself, and you have some money you could contribute towards their education, you could look into a homeschool co-op, or a part-time homeschool-curriculum based private school. These are both significantly cheaper than traditional private schools, and might offer an environment in which your children ...


7

The jury is still out on whether developmentally oriented activities prior to kindergarten have a long term impact. IMHO day care is over-rated as a teaching/learning environment. The high-end preschools do the activities and have curricula primarily to assuage the guilt parents feel at leaving the kids there all day. But really, it is just babysitting. ...


7

Unfortunately college admission is a very confusing and opaque process which is quite different for any individual college so this is almost impossible to answer in general (assuming you are talking about college in the US). I would recommend creating a list of colleges that you are interested, go there, view the campus, and talk directly to an admissions ...


6

We're struggling with similar questions ourselves. Our children are still in grade school and we made a cross country move this year. One of our kids adopted wonderfully and is happy both academically and socially. The other has been struggling with both. We're fortunate to have a few school options (albeit at a cost given they are private schools). What I ...


6

Have you just wandering around your local library? I've found quite a few books in ours with some pictures mixed with more complex text. Greek mythology works well - the stories are reasonably complex. We also used our library to get our daughter out of her comfort zone (in terms of themes). If she was stuck on Hardy Boys for too long, we'd try ...


6

The first schooling all children get is homeschooling. Depending on where you live and the way the parent(s) employment is arranged, they might have no teacher other than a parent for 6 weeks, a year, 4 years or more. The majority of children then go on to get some teaching from a trained professional (daycare worker, nursery school teacher, primary school ...


6

I think that home-school could be advantageous because my GPA would not carry over. I hate to break it to you, but colleges will almost certainly want to consider your entire high school GPA, and request a transcript from both your parents and the school you previously attended. Homeschooling for one semester doesn't "erase" the rest of your academic ...


5

Great question. This is not my area of expertise, but I contacted someone through my network that specializes in gifted and talented children and this is what she said: Some of my best friends are books by Halsted is a good book for the parents to have on their shelf. The parents can also go to shop.scholastic.com and look at books by reading level. I ...


5

I have to agree with noelicus that, at her age, she's still "practicing" handwriting rather than just using handwriting as a means to an end. If I recall correctly, your daughter is 6 which is, perhaps, a little young for typing. Plus, there's the question of whether or not her fine motor skills are refined enough to learn to type correctly. I mean, if ...


5

"We are visual creatures and we have to have pictures, not just text, to help us visualize things." I'd be a bit careful about that idea. Not everyone thinks the same way. In fact, people have a variety of learning styles, and most people find that one or two styles of learning may be more effective for them than others. You may want to suggest a variety ...


4

I suggest reading at least the first chapter of "Have Space Suit, Will Travel" by Robert A. Heinlein (the rest of the book is a bit entertaining, if dated, but the first chapter is pure gold). The suggestions there are more for high school students than grammar school students, but the philosophy is the same: Public school is crap. Especially for bright ...


4

I asked a friend of mine who is a literacy education professor this same question. (My son just started kindergarten and tested in the middle of second grade for reading, and is moving up rapidly.) She offered this professional advice: Congratulations! What it amounts to is that your son already has strong skills for decoding text and has many strategies ...


4

I think you've answered your own question when you say to do both. From personal experience I don't think cursive is necessary any more. I'm young enough that I never use it. Handwriting ie penmanship is still important for me of course, but not cursive. The only exception is that sometimes I find that I can write faster in cursive so this helpful for ...


4

I am writing this assuming you are in the US. I have no idea what educational entrance requirements exist for homeschooled students elsewhere in the world. As a public and private high school teacher, it is my understanding that even homeschool parents must submit a "transcript" of sorts to colleges their children are applying to. A quick search online ...


3

mmr is right, life skills are as important as academic skills. We also started a "word wall" around age 2 or 3 -- depending on the child's interest -- so they could start to recognize some sight words. We did simple things -- their name, "mommy," etc. -- and worked our way through the Dolch Word Lists (which are available online, e.g., ...


3

(I think that you have gotten some excellent answers from others, and am not trying to contend for "accepted answer". I thought some added information might be helpful.) Identification can be important in planning to provide for gifted children's needs. First, you may have an inaccurate sense of your child's abilities. The term "genius" is subject to a ...


3

Yes. But you can supplement their learning through other means than basically homeschooling after school! Fostering a culture of curiosity, exploration, creative play, conversation, critical thinking and active inquiry at home will go a long way, probably further in the long term. But, as you are a teacher, I'm assuming you know this!


3

You are obviously getting a lot of answers, this is a tough one. I taught preschool for two years and middle school (in what were supposedly highly rated, academically rigorous schools) for eight. I also taught twice exceptional kids for three (these are the ones that are often the targets of school "socialization" and most often bullied - sometimes even ...


3

I read books that are possible borderlines WITH Alice. We read a lot together anyway, and since I would be there while reading with her, if she gets stuck, I'm there to help OR if the book starts to wander into territory that isn't appropriate I'm there to make a judgement call or at least answer questions if that is needed as well. If my daughter finds ...



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