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16

The American Library Association is a sponsor of the Amelia Bloomer project, which looks each year for children's literature (both fiction and nonfiction) with strong female characters. Your local library is a great resource. Ask the librarians at your local library. They should be able to make some suggestions and recommendations. It is important to ...


7

I'm going to disagree with the accepted answer as to what a seven year old needs to know or what is part of the understanding of WW2. My issue is that while Hitler's fanatical racism was a part of the "why" and "what" of WW2, the answer glosses over the fact that he was an extreme German nationalist who wanted to rule the world. WW2 was a war of aggression: ...


7

I can tell you this much. Every historic event that my parents made me watch as a child, I'm glad that they made me do it. So I would recommend that you do take advantage of this opportunity.


6

While I consider this to be a more focused question than the one you link to I think the same principles apply in answering a question like this. You should have a good understanding of what your child can, and probably should, grasp and give your answer accordingly. I don't go into great detail with my son when he asks questions with deep context, and I ...


6

There are a few different ways to address this question: I'm not interested, but there are good reasons why my child should pay attention to it I'm not interested and don't think my child should be either, but eventually they might disagree and will feel aggreived at my choice my interest is secondary, my child will be bored by it, but they need to know ...


5

At least give them the opportunity, if they are not interested they will probably let you know that fact but at least then you are providing the forum for them to acknowledge the event. I know I barely remember the moon landing when it happened, but I do know I got to watch it on TV at the time so I feel I have that connection. I remember the wedding for ...


5

The nice thing about one on one discussions versus a classroom lecture setting is that kids that age are pretty good about letting you know they've heard enough. Start vague and answer his questions with more and more detail. At some point his attention will start to wander, so you give him time to process it and he will ask again another day. I studied ...


3

I'd first ask why would you need to? If this was for a history class, then you could give your view or teach them to research the topic, a fine time to learn how to use a library if they are old enough. If the topic is one you are knowledgable about you could have some conversations about the topic, looking into the causes and effects, if not then it is ...


2

Whether it will be important or not really depends on the child. Whether they have any "wonder" in the bigger picture of life. Some people are nose-down, focused on here-and-now, others are dreamers. And you may have an idea of where your child will be 10 years from now, but you won't be entirely sure. Of course, if you find that you look back on ...


2

If your children aren't old enough to decide for themselves you will ultimately be "helping them to decide" anyway because they will likely be doing what you are doing anyway. If you are at home in front of the TV, they will be at home in front of the TV. If you decide to take them to the beach they will be at the beach. You can base your decision on quite ...


2

Once your daughters are older, around six or seven or older, introduce them to the Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan. Some of the powerful girls in the series include Annabeth Chase (a total genius, despite dyslexia), Thalia Grace (one of the most powerful demigods alive), Clarisse La rue (all the guys fear her) and many, many others. There's even a group ...


1

Picture books: Amazing Grace - Miss Rumphius - Outside Over There - "Pish Posh", Said Heironymus Bosch - The Enchanter's Daughter - The Pirate Queen - Trouble With Trolls - Young Guinevere Chapter books: Gwinna - The Borrowers - The Secret Garden - Caddie Woodlawn - Julie of the Wolves - The 'Little House' books - The Chronicles of Prydain - The Tombs of ...


1

Bearing in mind that you don't get to filter the information, if your child's English is strong enough, you could take the simple way out: https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_2 - or if you're looking to filter, just read it to them (necessary if your child's English isn't strong enough).


1

You can give watered down versions that are age appropriate. You can also browse your local library for kids books on the subject, to at least see how others have structured a story for that age bracket.


1

Some great and thoughtful answers so thanks. I'm answering here because the event is over and I think we found a middle way which worked. We camped and surfed as planned but the wedding build up was on the car radio on the way down and I let the kids choose their favourite newspaper (all of them plastered with photos) from the service station and we caught ...


1

Your question is regarding events of historical significance, and I will use an example in my life that is of historical and relgious significance to answer. My sister is agnostic and they do not celebrate Easter. However, she wants her children to have exposure to the context of the holiday so that they can form their own thoughts, make their own choices ...



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